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Full text of "Catalog, 1940-41"

EASTERN KENTUCKY 
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 




RICHMOND, KENTUCKV 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1941-42 

Go to College in Kentucky" 



BULLETIN 

EASTERN KENTUCKY 
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 




CATALOG NUMBER 
1940-41 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1941-42 
RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



EASTERN KENTUCKY REVIEW 



VOL. XXXII 



FEBRUARY, 1941 



No. 6 



Published bi-monthly by the Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College and 

entered at the postoffice at Richmond, Kentucky, 

as second-class matter November 20, 1906. 



A STANDARD 

FOUR-YEAR TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Holding Membership in 

Kentucky Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

American Association of Teachers Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

and 
American Council on Education 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar, The College 5 

Certificates: 

Administration and Supervision 70 

Attendance Officers 71 

Elementary 68 

High School 70 

Curricula 53 

Degrees: 

Baccalaureate, Professional 56 

Baccalaureate, Non-Professional 62 

General Requirements 55 

Graduate 65 

Divisions of Instruction: 

Applied Arts and Sciences: 

V Agriculture 73 

>.(Commerce 76 

^<Home Economics 83 

s^^^ i^^ndustrial Arts 88 

^**^Library Science 93 

Fine Arts: 

4 Art .: 95 

l^usic 98 

Biffllogical and Physical Sciences: 

4Biology 116 

^Chemistry 119 

"^^General Science 115 

—s-Geology 121 

v^hysics 121 

Education 125 

Graduate Division 65 



\ 



Health/ and Physical Education: 



aealth 137 

i/Physical Education 138 

Languages: 

V English 143 

A French 151 

"Latin 153 

/ - Spanish 156 

^' Mathematics 157 

^ Military Science and Tactics 109 



Social Sciences: Page 

^Economics 161 

^Geography 163 

ijGrOvernment 167 

\History 168 

X Sociology 11,'^jA!A..t>t. 172 

General Information: * 

Admission Requirements 45 

Advanced Standing 45 

Aims of the College 22 

Alumni Association 48 

Assembly Programs 44 

Board 38 

Book Store 39 

Buildings 27 

Church Affiliations 42 

Commencement 48 

Credits 46 

Employment, Student 35 

Expenses 33 

Extension Division 49 

Grading System 46 

Health Service 39 

History 25 

Location 26 

Mail Service 39 

Numbering of Courses 45 

Organizations, Student 40 

Physical Education 40 

Publications, Student 42 

Reading Laboratory 43 

Rooms 36 

Schedule Changes 48 

Scholarships, Loans, and Special Awards.. 35 

Student Load 47 

Training School 51 

Withdrawals 48 

Organization: 

Administrative Staff 20 

Affiliated Training Schools 21 

Board of Regents 8 

Executive Committee 8 

Faculty 9 

Faculty Committees 18 

Library Staff 17 

Officers of the Board 8 



of 



IMPORTANT COLLEGE DATES 

REGULAR SESSION 1940-41 
First Semester 

September 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 Registration and classification 

freshman students 
Registration of upper classmen 
Last day to register for full load 
Last day to register for credit 
Christmas vacation begins 
Class work resumes at the first period 
Semester closes 



September 23 
September 30 
October 7 
December 
January 2 
January 31 



20 



February 3 
February 10 
February 17 

April 7 
April 9 
April 12 
June 6 



June 16 
June 18 
June 21 
July 4 
July 18 

July 21 
July 23 
July 26 
August 22 



Monday 

Monday 

Monday 

Friday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Second Semester 

Monday Registration 

Monday Last day to register for full load 

Monday Last day to register for credit 

Spring Term 

Monday Registration 

Wednesday Last day to register for full load 
Saturday Last day to register for credit 

Friday Semester closes 

SUMMER SESSION 1941 
First Term 

Monday Registration 

Wednesday Last day to register for full load 

Saturday Last day to register for credit 

Friday Holiday 

Friday Term closes 

Second Term 

Monday Registration 

Wednesday Last day to register for full load 
Saturday Last day to register for credit 

Friday Term closes 

REGULAR SESSION 1941-42 
First Semester 



September 17, 18, 19, 20 



September 22 
September 29 
October 6 
November 
December 
January 5 
January 30 



20 
20 



Monday 

Monday 

Monday 

Thursday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Friday 



*Admission and classification of 

freshmen 
Registration of upper classmen 
Last day to register for full load 
Last day to register for credit 
Thanksgiving (Holiday) 
Christmas holiday begins at noon 
Class work resumes at the first period 
Semester closes 



♦Freshman students are expected to be present at 8:30 a. m., Wednes- 
day, September 17, and remain for the entire period set aside for admission 
and classification of freshmen. 



CALENDAR 


1940 


1941 


July 


January 


July 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


Augrust 


February 


Augrust 


12 3 
"4 "5 "6 '"i 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 .... 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


September 


March 


September 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


October 


April 


October 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


November 


May 


November 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 
"4 "5 "6 "7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


December 


June 


December 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



February 2 
February 9 
February 16 



April 6 
April 8 
April 11 
June 5 



Second Semester 

Monday Registration 

Monday Last day to register for full load 

Monday Last day to register for credit 

Spring: Term 

Monday Registration 

Wednesday Last day to register for full load 
Saturday Last day to register for credit 

Friday Semester closes 



June 15 


Monday 


June 17 


Wednesday 


June 20 


Saturday 


July 4 


Saturday 


July 17 


Friday 


July 20 


S 
Monday 


July 22 


Wednesday 


July 25 


Saturday 


August 21 


Friday 



SUMMER SESSION 1942 
First Term 

Registration 

Last day to register for full load 

Last day to register for credit 

Holiday 

Term closes 

Second Term 

Registration 

Last day to register for full load 
Last day to register for credit 
Term closes 



REGULAR SESSION 1942-43 
First Semester 



September 16, 17, 18, 19 



21 
28 

19 
19 



September 
September 
October 5 
November 
December 
January 4 
January 29 

February 1 
February 8 
February 15 

April 5 
April 7 
April 10 
June 4 



Monday 

Monday 

Monday 

Thursday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Friday 



*Admission and classification of 

freshmen 
Registration of upper classmen 
Last day to register for full load 
Last day to register for credit 
Thanksgiving (Holiday) 
Christmas holiday begins at noon 
Class work resumes at the first period 
Semester closes 



Second Semester 

Monday Registration 

Monday Last day to register for full load 

Monday Last day to register for credit 

Spring Term 

Monday Registration 

Wednesday Last day to register for full load 
Saturday Last day to register for credit 

Friday Semester closes 



* Freshman students are expected to be present at 8:30 a. m. , Wednei- 
day, September 16, and remain for the entire period set aside for admission 
and classification of freshmen. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

JOHN W. BROOKER, 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction, ex officio Chairman 

GLENN O. SWING, Covington, Kentucky 

H. D. FITZPATRICK, Prestonsburg, Kentucky 

KEEN JOHNSON, Richmond, Kentucky 

JESSE M. ALVERSON, Lexington, Kentucky 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN W. BROOKER, Chairman 

H. D. FITZPATRICK, Vice-Chairman 

KATHERINE MORGAN, Secretary 

SPEARS TURLEY, Treasurer 

KEEN JOHNSON, Representative of Board of Regents on Council 
on Public Higher Education 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

KEEN JOHNSON, Chairman 

JESSE M. ALVERSON 

H. L. DONOVAN 

SPEARS TURLEY 



FACULTY 

H. L. DONOVAN, A. B., M. A., Ph. D., LL. D. President 

Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School; A. B., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky; M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
graduate student, University of Chicago; Ph. D., George Peabody 
College for Teachers; LL. D., University of Kentucky. 

WILLIAM C. JONES, B, S., A. M., Ph. D. Dean of Facility; 

Director of Personnel; 
Professor of Education 

B. S., East Texas State Teachers College; A. M., Colorado State 

Teachers College; Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
/ 
^-ttUGH P. ADAMS, Major, Field Artillery, U. S. Army 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Graduate of the Command and General Staff School, Fort 

Leavenworth, Kansas. 

KERNEY M. ADAMS, A. B., A. M. Associate Professor of History 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School; A. B., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky; A. M., Cornell University; additional graduate 
work, Harvard University 

CATHERINE C. AGNA, B. MUS. Instructor of Music; Teacher of Piano 

B. Mus., Oberlin College; graduate work, Oberlin College. 

JACK ALLEN, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Ph. D., 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 

ANNIE ALVIS, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 
A. B., State Teachers College, Farmville, Virginia; M. A., Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University. 

MRS. MARY EDMUNDS BARNHILL, A. B., M. A.. LL. B. 

Associate Professor of English 
Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School; A. B., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky; M. A., Ohio State University; LL. B., University 
of Louisville; additional graduate work, Ohio State University. 

*G. O. BRYANT, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Mathematics; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School; A. B., A. M., 
University of Kentucky. 

* Retired. 



10 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

PEARL L. BUCHANAN, A. B., M. A. Associate Professor of English 

A. B., Southwestern University; graduate student, University of 
Oklahoma and Northwestern University; M. A,, George Peabody 
College for Teachers. 

VIRGIL BURNS, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of History and Government 

Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School; student. 
Bowling Green Business University; A. B., University of Kentucky; 
M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University; additional graduate 
work, Columbia University. 

MARY KING BURRIER, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
Diploma, Hamilton College; B. S., M. S., University of Ken- 
tucky; graduate work, Columbia University, and University of 
Chicago. 

JANE CAMPBELL, B. Mus., A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Music 

B. Mus., Taylor University; A. B., Eastern Indiana State Normal 
School; graduate work. State Teachers College, Indiana, Pa.; A. M., 
Columbia University; Ecole Normale de Musique, Paris; student of 
Nadia Boulanger. 

ASHBY B. CARTER, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Agriculture 

Student, University of Richmond, University of Virginia, and 
Virginia Mechanics Institute; B. S., M. A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers; graduate work, Columbia University and University 
of Kentucky. 

MRS. EMMA YOUNG CASE, A. B., M. A. Associate Professor of 

Education; Dean of Women 
Student, University of Kentucky; A. B., Eastern Kentucky State 
Teachers College; M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

^ELIZABETH CHERRY, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of Physical 

Education 

A. B., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Lou- 
isiana State University. 

ROY B. CLARK, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of English 

Diploma, Nebraska State Normal School; A. B., University of 
Nebraska; A. M., Ph. D., Columbia University. 

J. DORLAND COATES, B. S., M. A., Ph. D. Associate Professor of 

Secondary Education; Supervisor of 
Instruction in High Schools 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; Ph. D., Colorado State College of 
Education; graduate work. University of Chicago. 

MEREDITH J. COX, B. S., M. A. Professor of Chemistry 

Diploma, Warren Academy; B. S., M. A., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers; additional graduate work, Columbia University, 
University of Wisconsin, and Duke University. 



CATALOG 1940-41 11 

NOEL B. CUFF, B. S., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of Psychology 

B. S., A. M., Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

N. G. DENISTON, B. M. T., B. S., M. S. Associate Professor of 

Industrial Arts 

B. M. T., Valparaiso University; student, Stout Institute, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology; B. S. Bradley Polytechnic Institute; 
graduate worlc, University of Chicago; M. S., Kansas State Teachers 
College of Pittsburg. 

RUTH DIX, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Home Economics 

Student, Bradley Polytechnic Institute, and University of Illi- 
nois; B. S., Bradley Polytechnic Institute; M. A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

J. T. DORRIS, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of History and Government 

A. B., Illinois College; A. M., University of Wisconsin; Ph. D., 
University of Illinois. 

RICHARD A. EDWARDS, A. B., A. M. Professor of Education; 

Director of Training School 

A. B., University of Kentucky; A. M., Columbia University. 

FRED A. ENGLE, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Student, Cumberland College, University of Chicago; A. B., 
A. M., Ph. D., University of Kentucky. 

LAURA KATHERINE EVANS, B. S. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Rural Demonstration School 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; graduate work, 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 

JACOB D. FARRIS, A. M., M. D. Professor of Health Education; 

College Physician 

Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School and Teachers 
College; student, University of Chicago; A. M., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers; M. D., Vanderbilt University. 

D. THOMAS FERRELL, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Associate Professor of Education 

A. B., A. M., Duke University; M, A, Teachers College, Columbia 
University; one quarter. Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland; Ph. D. 
George Peabody College for Teachers; graduate work. University of 
Chicago. 

DORD EDWARD FITZ, A. B. Assistant Professor of Art 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; student. Art 
Institute of Chicago; graduate work. The State University of Iowa. 

MARY FLOYD, A. B., M. A., B. S. in Library Service 

Associate Professor of History; Librarian 
A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M, A., Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University; graduate work, University of 
Chicago; B. S. in Library Service, Columbia University. 



12 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

EDITH G. FORD, B. C. S., A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Commerce 

Diploma, Louisiana State Normal College; B. C. S., Bowling 
Green Business University; A. B., George Washington University; 
A. M., University of Kentucky; student. University of Paris. 

ALLIE FOWLER, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B, S., M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers 

MAUDE GIBSON Assistant Professor of Art 

Graduate, Lebanon Normal; two years' course in public school 
art, Teachers College, Miami University; student, New York School 
of Applied Design and Teachers College, Columbia University. 

FREDERIC P. GILES, B. Mus., B. A., M. A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B. Mus., Southern Methodist University; B. A. North Texas 
State Teachers College; M. A., George Peabody College for Teach- 
ers; additional graduate work, George Peabody College for 
Teachers. 

ANNA D. GILL, B. C. S., A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of Commerce 

B. C. S., Bowling Green Business University; student, Chicago 
Gregg School, University of Wisconsin, and Western Kentucky State 
Teachers College; A. B., M. A., University of Kentucky; additional 
graduate work, Columbia University. 

T. HAROLD GLOVER, A. B., M. S., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Biology 

A. B., Greenville College; M. S., University of Michigan; Ph. D., 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 

p. M. GRISE, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of English 

A. B., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; Ph. D., University of Kentucky. 

G. M. GUMBERT, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Agriculture 

B. S., M. S., University of Kentucky. 

CYRIL FRANCIS HAGER, B. A., M. A. Assistant Professor of Public 

Speaking and Dramatics 

B. A., M. A., University of Wisconsin; additional graduate work, 
Cornell University and University of Wisconsin. 

MAY C. HANSEN, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Education 

Diploma, Oshkosh State Teachers College; student, University 
of Chicago and Columbia University; B. S., George Peabody College 
for Teachers; M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

GEORGE N. HEMBREE, B. C. S., A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of 

Health and Physical Education 

Student, Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College, University 
of Illinois, and Gearge Peabody College for Teachers; B. C. S., Bowl- 
ing Green Business University; A. B., M. A., University of Kentucky. 

THOMAS C. HERNDON, B. S., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry 

B. S., University of Kentucky; graduate work. University of 
Chicago; M. A., Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 



CATALOG 1940-41 13 

GERTRUDE M. HOOD, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A. M., Columbia University. 

SAUL HOUNCHELL, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of English 

A. B., Denison University; M. A., Ph. D., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers. 

MAX HENRY HOUTCHENS, B. S., A. M. Assistant Professor of 

Commerce and Mathematics; 
Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

B. S., Nebraska State Teachers College; A. M., Colorado State 
College of Education. 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of 

Physical iSducation 

Diploma, Morton-Elliott Junior College; A. B., University of 
Kentucky; M. A,, University of Michigan. 

ARNIM DEAN HUMMEL, B. S., M. S., Ph. D. Professor of Physics 

B. S., Knox College; M. S., Ph. D., University of Illinois. 

EMERSON D. JENKINS, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 

A. B., Colgate University; M. A., Ph. D., Ohio State University. 

WILLIAM L. KEENE, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of English 

Diploma, Middle Tennessee State Normal School; B. S., M. A., 
George Peabody College for Teachers; additional graduate work, 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 

CHARLES A. KEITH, B. A., M. A., Ped. D. Professor of History and 

Government; Dean of Men 
Student, University of Arkansas and University of Texas; B. A., 
M. A., Oxford University; Honorary Doctor of Pedagogy; Ohio North- 
ern University; additional graduate work, Indiana University. 

L. G. KENNAMER, A. B., B. S., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Geography 

and Geology 

A. B., Sirmnons University; student, University of Wisconsin, 
Vanderbilt University, and University of Tennessee; B. S., M. A., 
Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

JOHN ROSS KINZER, A. B., B. Mus., M. A., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of 

Philosophy; Director of Bands 

A. B., B. Mus., Washburn College; M. A., University of Kansas; 
Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

H. H. LaFUZE, A. B., M. S., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Biology 

A B., DePauw University; M. S., Ph. D., State University of 
Iowa. 

O. D. LASCOE, B. S. Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts 

B. S., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; graduate 
work, Purdue University. 



14 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

ALFRED LEE LASSITER, B. S., M. A. Principal of High Schools 

B, S., William and Mary College; M. A., Columbia University. 

CORA LEE, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Education 

B. S., George Peabody College for Teachers; M. A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University; additional graduate work, University 
of Chicago. 

MARGARET LINGENFELSER, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of 

Elementary Education; Supervising 
Teacher, Elementary Training School 
A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University; additional graduate work, Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

THOMAS E. Mcdonough, B. S., M. a. Professor of Health 

and Physical Education 
Diploma, La Crosse Teachers College; student, Columbia Uni- 
versity; B. S., M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers; addi- 
tional graduate work, Louisiana State University. 

MARY FRANCES McKINNEY, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Geography 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; B. S., M. A., 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 

MELVIN E. MATTOX, B. S., M. A. Professor of Education; Registrar; 

Director of Extension 

Diploma, Mississippi State Normal School; B. S., M. A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; additional graduate work, George 
Peabody College for Teachers. 

V^ WILLIAM J. MOORE, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of Economics 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School; student. Col- 
lege of Law, University of Kentucky; A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. 

MRS. JANET MURBACH, A. B., A. M., Docteur de I'universite' de 

Toulouse, France. Professor of French 

A. B., Oberlin College, student. University of Paris and Univer- 
sity of California; A. M., University of Kentucky; Docteur de 
I'universite' de Toulouse, France. 

V^ MARGARET NEALE, A. B., M. A. Instructor of English; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers. 

EARL T. NOBLE, B. S. First Lieutenant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

B. S., Purdue University. 

•^ W. F. O'DONNELL, A. B., M. A. Supervisor of Student Teaching, 

Richmond City Schools 

A. B., Transylvania College; M. A., Columbia University. 



/ 



CATALOG 1940-41 15 

SMITH PARK, B. S., M. S., Ph. D. Professor of Mathematics 

B. S., M. S., Ph. D., University of Kentucky. 

ELLEN PUGH, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A. M., Ohio State University; 
additional graduate work, Ohio State University. 

ROME RANKIN, A. B., M. A. Associate Professor of Physical 

Education; Athletic Coach 
Diploma, University of Michigan, School of Physical Education; 
Diploma, University of Notre Dame, Coaching School; A. B., 
Waynesburg College; M. A., University of Michigan; student, Mus- 
kingum College; additional graduate work, University of Michigan. 

,*^,WfLLIAM C. REEVES, B. S. First Lieutenant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; 

^ Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

B. S., Purdue University. 

ALMA REGENSTEIN, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Home Economics; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 
B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 

R. R. RICHARDS, A. B., M. B. A. Assistant Professor of Commerce 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; graduate stu- 
dent, University of Kentucky; M. B. A., College of Business Admin- 
istration, Boston University; additional graduate work, Boston Uni- 
versity; student. College of Law, Boston University; University of 
Southern California. 

HAROLD RIGBY, B. S. Director of High School Band and Orchestra 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; Graduate 
work, University of Kentucky. 

DEAN W. RUMBOLD, B. S., Ph. D. Professor of Biology 

B. S., University of Buffalo; graduate student, University of 
Wisconsin; Ph. D., Duke University. 

RUBY RUSH, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Latin; Supervising 

Teacher, Model High School 
Graduate, Virginia Interment College; A. B., University of Ken- 
tucky; A. M., Columbia University. 

TOM C. SAMUELS, Ph. C, B, S., M. S. Assistant Athletic Coach; 

Instructor of Science; Supervising 
Teacher, Model High School 

Ph. C, B. S., University of Michigan; M. S., University of 
Kentucky. 

ANNA A. SCHNIEB, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of Education 

Diploma, Indiana State Teachers College; student, Indiana Uni- 
versity; A B., A. M., Columbia University; additional graduate 
work, Columbia University and University of Chicago; Ph. D., Uni- 
versity of Vienna. 



16 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

BLANCHE SAMS SEEVERS, B. Mus., A. B., M. Mus. Assistant Professor 

of Music 

B. Mus., A. B., University of Kansas; M. Mus., Northwestern 
University. 

EVELYN SLATER, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B. S., M. S., University of Kentucky; additional graduate work, 
Columbia University. 

THOMAS STONE, Mus. B. Assistant Professor of Music 

Mus. B., Oberlin College; additional work. La FoUette School 
of Music, New York. 

VIRGINIA F. STORY, B. S., M. A, Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 
Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; B. S., M. A., 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 

BROWN E. TELFORD, B. S. Assistant Professor of Music; 

Teacher of Piano and Organ 
Diploma, Greenbrier College for Women; student, Cincinnati 
Conservatory of Music, New York School of Music and Arts, New 
England Conservatory of Music; B. S., Columbia University. 

MRS. JULIAN TYNG, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Education 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School and Teachers 
College; B. S., George Peabody College for Teachers; graduate 
work, George Peabody College for Teachers; M. A., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University. 

JAMES E. VAN PEURSEM, A. B., B. Mus., M. A. Associate Professor of Music 
A. B., Morningside College; B. Mus., Oberlin College; M. A., 
New York University. 

SAMUEL WALKER, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of History; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

A. B., Maryville College; A. M., University of Kentucky. 

RALPH W.'WHALIN, B. S., M. Ed. Associate Professor of Industrial Arts 

B. S., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; M. Ed., Uni- 
versity of Missouri. 

ELIZABETH WILSON, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 

Diploma, Martin College; B. S., M. A., George Peabody College 

for Teachers. 

^ GERMANIA J. WINGO, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

/ ^ Education; Supervising Teacher, 

Elementary Training School 
Diploma, Virginia State Normal School; Diploma in critic work, 
Columbia University; B. S., M. A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity; additional graduate work. University of Colorado. 



CATALOG 1940-41 17 

/ LIBRARY STAFF 

/MARY FLOYD, A. B., M. A., B. S. in Library Service Librarian 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University; graduate student, University of 
Chicago; B. S. in Library Service, Columbia University. 

ISABEL BENNETT, A. B., B. S. in Library Science Assistant Librarian 

in Charge of Circulation 

A. B., University of Kentucky; B. S. in Library Science, Colum- 
bia University. 

yiDA. GREENLEAF, A. B., B. S. in Library Science Assistant Librarian 

in Charge of Training School Library 

A. B., University of Kentucky; B. S. in Library Science, George 
Peabody College for Teachers. 
t 

^ FRANCIS MASON, A. B., A. B. in Library Science Assistant Librarian 

in Charge of Cataloging 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; A. B. in 
Library Science, Emory University. 

MRS. LUCILE WHITEHEAD, B. S., B. S. in Library Science 

Assistant Librarian in Charge of Reference Work 

B. S., B. S. in Library Science, George Peabody College for 
Teachers. 



^ 






■^ /►^p^^*""***^^*"^^ 



COMMITTEES 

ALUMNI 

Beckley, Allen, Adams, Barksdale, Broaddus, Case, Coates, Evans, 

Fitz, Floyd, Lingenfelser, McKinney, Moore, Neale, Norsworthy, 

Park, Regenstein, Richards, Story, Tyng 

ATHLETICS 

McDonough, Coates, Farris, Park, Hummel 

CREDITS AND CREDENTIALS 
Mattox, Carter, Clark, Cuff, Gumbert, Herndon, Jones, Lee, Pai'k 

CURRICULUM 

Jones, Clark, Cox, Dix, Edwards, Farris, Giles, Hummel, Keith, 

Kennamer, McDonough, Mattox, Moore, Murbach, Park, Rumbold, 

Van Peursem, Whalin, and four students 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 
Moore, Barnhill, Burns, Gill, Jones, McKinney, Mattox, Walker 

J EVALUATION 

Coates, Adams, Beckley, Cox, Cuff, Ford, Herndon, Jenkins, Keene, 
Lee, McDonough, and four students 

/ EXTENSION 

Carter, Adams, Dorris, Engle, Hembree, Jones, Mattox 

FINE ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT 

Farris, Buchanan, Campbell, Giles, Kennamer, Kinzer, Murbach, 
Seevers, Stone, Telford, Tyng, Van Peursem, and four students 

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

Jones, Clark, Coates, Giles, Hummel, Keith, Kennamer, McDonough, 
Moore, Park, Schnieb 

GRADUATION 

Kennamer, Case, Farris, Hummel, Jenkins, Jones, Keith, Mattox 

LIBRARY 

Floyd, Allen, Edwards, Hager, Herndon, Hughes, Jenkins, Jones, 
Keene, LaFuze, Lee, McKinney, two juniors and two seniors 



CATALOG 1940-41 19 

PLANS AND PROGRAMS 

Moore, Carter, Clark, Dix, Edwards, Farris, Floyd, Giles, Hummel 

Keith, Kennamer, Mattox, Murbach, Park, Van Peursem, Walker, 

Whalin, and four students 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Beckley, Allen, Coates, Deniston, Ford, Keene, Kennamer, Kinzer, 
Lee, Moore, Whalin, and four students 

RURAL EDUCATION 

Ferrell, Case, Dorris, Edwards, Engle, Evans, Hansen, Hughes, Lin- 
genfelser, Regenstein, Tyng, and four students 

SOCIAL 

Case, Allen, Beckley, Cherry, Dix, Glover, Hummel, Keith, Lee, 
Tyng, and eight students 

STUDENT GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL 

Jones, Case, Coates, Cuff, Edwards, Farris, Grise, Keith, LaFuze, Lee, 
Mattox and Wingo 

STUDENT LOANS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS 

Cuff, Brock, Case, Cox, Keith, McDonough, Rankin, Schnieb 

STUDENT UNION COMMITTEE 
Chenault, Ballou, Case, Jones, Mcllvaine, and five students 

STUDENT WELFARE, DISCIPLINE AND GRIEVANCES 

Donovan, Floyd, Jones, Lee, McDonough, Park, Whalin 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

Edwards, Allen, Alvis, Covington, Evans, Greenleaf, Houtchens, 
LaFuze, Lingenfelser, McCarthy, O'Donnell, Rush, Story, and four 

students 

VISUAL EDUCATION 

Gumbert, Dorris, Fitz, Floyd, LaFuze, Mattox, Rumbold, Tyng 



7^. i '^^. 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

G. M. BROCK, Business Agent 

W. A, AULT, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

FRED BALLOU, Book Store Manager 

MRS. MARTHA C. BARKSDALE, A. B., Recorder, Registrar's Office 

SAM BECKLEY, A. B., Assistant Director of Extension 

MRS. INEZ McKINLEY BLAIR, Assistant to the Business Agent 

V^ MRS. ETHEL BLANTON, Housekeeper, Burnam Hall 

LOUISE BROADDUS, A. B., Stenographer, President's Office 

VMRS. KATHARINE CHENAULT, A. B., Hostess, Student Union 

Building 

LOIS COLLEY, Assistant to Alumni Secretary 

\/aNNA MEADE GRAHAM, B. S., Secretary to Director of Extension 

V^MRS. RUTH FLANARY GRIBBIN, Secretary to Registrar 

MRS. BESSIE H. GRIGGS, Information Clerk 

MRS. C. A. KEITH, Housekeeper, Men's Dormitory 

E. P. McCONNELL, Bookkeeper 

EDITH L. McILVAINE, Supervisor of Cafeteria 

KATHRYN McNUTT, Secretary to Business Agent 

KATHERINE MORGAN, Secretary to the President 

»^MRS. GLADYS K. NORSWORTHY, B. S., Cashier 

MRS. HELEN W. PERRY, Asssistant to Director of Personnel 

W VIRGINIA STITH, B. S., Stenographer, Dean's Office 

JENNIE MAE TRIGG, B. S., Assistant Supervisor of Cafeteria 

MA YE M. WALTZ, Secretary to the Dean 

NORRINE WASSON, B. S., Assistant Supervisor of Cafeteria 

EDNA WHITE, Registered Nurse 

EUNICE .WINGO, Secretary to the Dean of Women 



AFFILIATED TRAINING SCHOOLS 

RICHMOND CITY SCHOOLS 



Madison High School 

W. F. O'DONNELL, A. B., M. A Superintendent of Schools 

A. L. LASSITER, B. S., M. A Principal 

MRS. PARK N. BALDWIN, A. B English 

KENNETH CANFIELD, B. S Auto Mechanics 

RALPH CARLISLE, A. B History 

MARY LOUISE COVINGTON, A. B., M. A Languages 

RUTH ECTON, A. B Music 

NANCY EVANS, A. B., M. A English 

J, A. KUNKEL Attendance Officer 

JANE MELTON, B. S., M. S Home Economics 

HARVEY K. MEYER, A. B Industrial Arts 

JESSE MOBERLY, A. B., M. A. Mathematics 

JAMES RICHARDSON, B. S., M. A Science 

LOUISE RUTLEDGE, A. B Librarian 

Junior High School 

RU BEE, A. B. English, Seventh-Eighth Grades 

MABEL KUNKEL, A. B —Geography, Seventh-Eighth Grades 

MOSSIE STOCKER, A. B History, Seventh-Eighth Grades 

HORTENSE WILLOUGHBY, A. B Mathematics, Seventh -Eighth Grades 

Elementary School 

VIDA BOND, B. S First Grade 

MABEL DUDLEY, A. B., B. Mus Sixth Grade 

NORMA DYKES, A. B Third Grade 

IDA MAE HASTIE, B. S Third Grade 

GENEVA McCarthy, B. S second Grade 

MRS. GEORGIANA McGLOSSON, A. B., M. A Sixth Grade 

CURTIS McKINNEY Second Grade 

MARGARET RISK Fifth Grade 

SUE SCRIVENER, A. B First Grade 

DOROTHY SHAWHAN Fourth Grade 

MARGARET TELFORD, A. B., M. A Fourth Grade 

WILL TRAYNOR First Grade 

LEIGH WHITE Fifth Grade 

JOSEPHINE YATES, A. B Second-Third Grades 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

AIMS OF THE COLLEGE 

The primary aim of Eastern Kentucky State Teachers 
College is to prepare teachers for the schools of Ken- 
tucky. In accomplishing this aim the college should 
develop in the prospective teacher: 

1. As a general basis for all good teaching an under- 
standing of what is going on in the world and what 
has gone on in the past and the ability to adapt such 
understanding to situations that may arise for him 
as a member of society, 

2. A number of more or less specialized understandings 
such as: 

a. An understanding of the function of education 
in a democratic society. It may be assumed that 
the success of a democratic society is dependent 
upon a wide dissemination of such education as 
will enable its citizens to meet situations and 
solve problems that may arise in a changing 
society. 

b. An understanding of the relation of the 
individual to society in a democratic society. 
It may be assumed that the integrity of 
character of the individual and the insepara- 
bility of freedom and responsibility, of rights 
and duties, constitute the very foundation of 
democracy. 

c. An understanding of child behavior at the 
different age periods. 

d. An understanding of the social forces at work 
upon the child. 

e. An understanding of child health, both physical 
and mental, in the learning process. 

f. An understanding of the influence of the 
physical and mental health of the teacher upon 
the child. 



CATALOG 1940-41 23 

g. An understanding of the importance of the 
teacher's patterns of conduct. 

h. An understanding of the function of the arts in 
the education of the teacher. It should be 
recognized that the arts have power to release 
emotional tensions, and thereby promote 
health, and to develop esthetic insights and a 
sensitiveness to beauty and ugliness. 

i. An understanding of the function of the sciences 
in the education of the teacher. Such under- 
standing should be of great service in helping 
him make use of the resources of the community 
and developing open-mindedness and an in- 
clination to distinguish between belief and 
proof. 

j. An understanding of the importance of the 
social development of the teacher. This would 
include such attitudes and abilities as willing- 
ness and ability to cooperate with one's 
colleagues, a desire for wholesome recreation, 
and the willingness and ability to make the use 
of good English habitual. 

k. An understanding of the importance of the 
sensitivity and adaptability of the teacher to the 
possibilities of the community. 

1. An understanding of the various learning 
processes and the corresponding teaching 
techniques. 

m. An adequate understanding of the particular 
area of experience or field of subject matter 
which the student has selected to teach. 

n. An understanding of what constitutes good 
teaching. 

B. Another aim is to furnish guidance and to provide 
instruction in vocations other than teaching. 

1. The selection of the best students for prospective 
teachers: 
a. By encouraging such high school graduates to 



24 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

come to Eastern as have been recommended by 
superintendents and principals, 
b. By selecting from the students enrolled only 
such as possess or may develop good qualities 
for teachers. 

2. The furnishing of counsel and guidance for vocations 
to the students who do not expect to teach or are 
not suited to teaching. 

3. The providing of instruction for those students who 
are not preparing to become teachers. 

a. Basic education approximately the same as for 
teachers. 

b. Pre-professional for medicine, law, engineering, 
etc. 

c. Vocational studies such as may be pursued in 
the fields of agriculture, commerce, and the 
practical arts. 

4. The providing of vocational education for adults. 

C. A third aim of Eastern is to make a real contribution 
to the life of the community or area which the college 
serves: 

1. By preparing only worthy teachers. 

2. By conducting extension courses (either on the 
campus or off) , or study centers when requested. 

3. By furnishing expert advice or other assistance at 
teachers' conferences. 

4. By supplying speakers for high school commence- 
ments and other community activities. 

5. By keeping a personal interest in the graduates and 
encouraging professional and intellectual growth. 

6. By keeping in close touch with the needs of the 
teachers in the field and by being ready to give 
assistance to the teachers. 

7. By holding on the college campus conferences for 
the further development of leaders. 

8. By supplying to the teachers of the community 
which the college serves library materials and other 
materials such as visual aids. 



CATALOG 1940-41 25 

GROWTH OF EASTERN KENTUCKY STATE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE 

The year the State of Massachusetts established normal 
schools for the preparation of teachers, Kentucky established 
a public school system. The first Superintendent of Public 
Instruction of Kentucky in his initial report requested the 
General Assembly for "the founding of one or more normal 
schools for the purpose of training the sons of the soil for 
teaching." Fifteen different state superintendents appeared 
before more than thirty sessions of the Legislature making 
the same plea for a school for teachers. Sixty-eight years 
passed before the General Assembly of 1906 heeded this 
request. The late J. C. W. Beckham, Governor of the State 
at that time, signed the bill establishing the Eastern Ken- 
tucky State Normal School on March 21, 1906, and shortly 
after this a commission selected the campus of old Central 
University at Richmond as the site of the new school 

Founded in a period when popular education was viewed 
with disfavor by many as a form of charity, the school 
immediately launched itself into the task of training teachers 
in order that the burden of illiteracy and ignorance might 
be lifted from the State. Kentucky was in 1906 one of two 
states in the Union not providing state normal schools, and 
only three states showed a greater percentage of ignorance 
among their white population. 

When Eastern was established the average education of 
a Kentucky school teacher was seventh grade. Today the 
average teacher of the State has attended college three 
years, and over two thirds of the teachers are college 
graduates. Eastern is one of the several educational agencies 
of the State that have brought about the change in teacher 
education. 

The curriculum has been improved from the short 
review and certificate courses of the first years to a four- 
year curriculum leading to the bachelor of arts or the 
bachelor of science degree, and a one-year graduate cur- 
riculum leading to the master of arts degree in education. 
Requirements for college entrance have been raised from 
eighth grade graduation or possession of any kind of 
certificate to graduation from an accredited high school. 



26 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Four presidents have contributed to the building of 
Eastern. The first was Ruric Nevel Roark, a distinguished 
author and educator, whose untimely death in 1909 ended his 
brilliant career. Mr. Roark was succeeded by John Grant 
Crabbe, who was at the time of his appointment Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction. Dynamic, aggressive, and 
energetic. President Crabbe greatly increased the popularity 
of the new school with the people. In 1916 he resigned to 
accept the presidency of the Colorado State Teachers College 
and was succeeded by T. J. Coates, State Supervisor of 
Schools. 

Under President Coates' administration new buildings 
began to appear, the faculty was increased, and the course of 
study was extended. At the beginning of his administration 
the institution was receiving $75,000 annually for operation 
and maintenance. Twelve years later, at the time of his 
death, the appropriation was $307,000. 

H. L. Donovan was appointed president in 1928 and is 
still serving in that capacity. During the administration of 
President Donovan the college has grown rapidly and 
attained a place of national prominence in the professional 
world. 

LOCATION 

Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College is in Rich- 
mond, Madison County, Kentucky, on the main line of the 
L. & N. Railway, 112 miles south of Cincinnati, Ohio; on 
the Dixie Highway (U. S. No. 25), 26 miles southeast of 
Lexington; on U. S. Highway No. 227; and on Kentucky 
Highway No. 52. 

Located on the southeastern rim of the famous Blue- 
grass Region of Kentucky, the college is surrounded by 
places of historic and scenic interest. These places of interest 
include: Boonesboro (12 miles), Harrodsburg and Shaker- 
town (45 miles), Herrington Lake (35 miles), Cumberland 
Falls (100 miles), Frankfort State Capitol (55 miles), Berea 
College (14 miles), Kentucky Natural Bridge State Park 
(63 miles), My Old Kentucky Home (85 miles), Louisville 
(100 miles), Lincoln Memorial (110 miles), the foothills of 
the Cumberland Mountains (20 miles) , and the famous stock 
farms in the heart of the Bluegrass Region (26 miles). 



CATALOG 1940-41 27 

THE CAMPUS 
Eastern began its career in 1906 with three buildings on 
thirty acres of bluegrass land. The buildings included the 
University Building, Memorial Hall, and a gymnasium. 

University Building 

The University Building, a handsome, four-story brick 
structure, was constructed in 1874 and as a result of excellent 
repair work still stands, serving as well as when it was built 
more than sixty-six years ago. It stands as a landmark on 
the campus, housing a part of the high school division of the 
Eastern Teachers College Training School. 

Memorial Hall 

Memorial Hall, which was first used as a dormitory for 
women and later as a dormitory for men, was razed in 
1938, after fifty-five years of splendid service, to make room 
for a new dormitory for men. 

Gymnasium 

The third building in the original plant, a gymnasium, 
served Eastern until 1920, when it was destroyed by fire. 



In 1909 three additions were made to the college plant: 
Ruric Nevel Roark Building, Sullivan Hall, and a power 
plant. Other additions have been made as needed. 

Roark Building 
Roark Building has recently been completely repaired 
and redecorated. It provides excellent housing facilities for 
the departments of mathematics, chemistry, biology, physics, 
geography, and geology. It was named in honor of Dr. Ruric 
Nevel Roark, Eastern's first president. 

Sullivan Hall 

Sullivan Hall is a dormitory for women and accom- 
modates approximately 158 women students. It has been 
kept in good repair throughout the years and is a comfortable 
and convenient home for the girls who choose to live there. 



28 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Power Plant 

The power plant serves as a central heating unit for all 
the buildings on the campus. It provides a uniform supply 
of heat for all parts of the physical plant. 

President's Home 

The substantial, two-story brick residence which today 
serves as the President's home was constructed in 1889 as a 
residence for the Chancellor of Central University but did 
not become the property of the college until 1912. It has 
recently been redecorated and is in an excellent state of 
repair. 

Cottages 

In 1914 the college purchased a group of cottages on the 
east side of the campus which were then collectively called 
Faculty Row. Two of these cottages are still serving the 
college as residences for the college physician and the 
superintendent of buildings and grounds. 

Cammack Building 

The James W. Cammack Building was constructed in 
1918 and named for a man who was appointed to the first 
Board of Regents for the college in 1906 and who remained 
on the Board as an efficient and faithful servant until his 
death in 1939. The building is designed and used entirely 
for the elementary grades of the college training school. 

Memorial Hall Annex 

Memorial Hall Annex was built in 1920. It has recently 
been remodeled and now provides convenient dormitory 
accommodations for 60 men. 

Burnam Hall 

The first section of Burnam Hall, a dormitory for women, 
was completed in 1920. An addition to this building was 
constructed in 1926 and still another section was built in 
1940. The entire structure provides beautiful, comfortable 
living quarters for 370 women. It is fireproof. Most of the 
rooms are arranged in suites of two with a connecting bath. 
A few rooms have private baths. Prospective students are 



CATALOG 1940-41 29 

invited to inspect rooms in either Burnam Hall or Sullivan 
Hall at their convenience. These buildings are open 
practically every day in the year. 

Crabbe Library 

In 1923 the original section of the John Grant Crabbe 
Library was built. The building was enlarged to its present 
size in 1935. It houses over 60,000 volumes, 4,000 of which 
are in a special collection of Kentuckiana, and several 
hundred periodicals. The John Wilson Townsend Collection 
of Kentuckiana is one of the most extensive of its kind in 
existence. The library was named in honor of Eastern's 
second president, John Grant Crabbe, who served the 
institution from 1909 to 1916. 

Stateland Farm 
New Stateland Farm, containing 148.63 acres, was 
purchased by the college in 1923. This increased the tract 
of land owned by the college to 188.89 acres. As a result 
of the purchase of three additional tracts of adjoining land, 
New Stateland Farm now includes 182.88 acres and the total 
college-owned acreage is now 223.8. The farm is used as a 
laboratory by the department of agriculture. A large 
portion of the vegetables, fruits, and dairy products from 
the farm are used in the college cafeteria. The farm is 
the home of one of the finest purebred Holstein dairy herds 
in the country. New Stateland Hall is located on the farm 
and is used as a residence by the farm manager and as a 
men's dormitory. 

Coates Administration Building 

The Thomas Jackson Coates Administration Building 
was constructed in 1928 and named in honor of Eastern's 
third president who was head of the college from 1916 to 
1928. This building is the center of administration for 
Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. Visitors who are 
unacquainted with the college will find their way about the 
campus more easily by reporting to this building first for 
information. The offices are open from 7:30 to 12:00 and 
from 1:00 to 4:30 each week day except Saturday. The 



30 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

offices are closed Saturday afternoon and all day Sunday. 
The offices of the president, dean, registrar, business agent 
and some of the department heads are in this building. 

Rural Demonstration School 

The Rural Demonstration School was built in 1929. It 
serves as a laboratory in which students who plan to teach 
in the one-room rural schools of the State may get practical 
experience. 

Hiram Brock Auditorium 

The Hiram Brock Auditorium adjoins the Administration 
Building and might be considered a part of it. It was built 
in 1930 and has a seating capacity of 2,000. This auditorium 
has a stage 40 feet by 30 feet, equipped with a large number 
of curtains and drops, a modern movie projection room, and 
a Hammond electric organ. The auditorium building also 
contains ten studios, dressing rooms, and three classrooms. 

Weaver Health Building 

The Weaver Health Building, constructed in 1931, is 
named for the late Charles F. Weaver of Ashland, Kentucky, 
who served on the Board of Regents at Eastern from 1920 
to 1932. It is one of the largest and best equipped buildings 
on the campus. In it there are two gymnasiums, one 110 feet 
by 90 feet and one 74 feet by 40 feet, a large variety of 
physical education apparatus, an official-size tile swimming 
pool equipped with machinery for heating, filtering, and 
purifying all water that enters the pool, more than 1,200 
steel lockers for the use of the students, offices of the college 
physician and members of the physical education staff, 
several classrooms, ROTC headquarters, and the bacteriology 
laboratory. 

Hanger Stadium 

Hanger Stadium was built in 1936. The college received 
this valuable addition to the plant as a gift from students, 
faculty, and friends of the college, supplemented by a 
PWA grant. This concrete, steel, and tile structure has 
dormitory accommodations for thirty men students, offices 
for coaches, dressing and equipment rooms, and showers. 
The seating capacity is 5,000. 



CATALOG 1940-41 31 

Beckham Hall, McCreary Hall, Miller Hall 

The new dormitory for men is, strictly speaking, three 
separate buildings: McCreary Hall, Miller Hall, and Beckham 
Hall. Each section provides the very finest dormitory 
accommodations for 48 men. Total capacity of the three 
wings is 144. The rooms are arranged in suites of four 
with one adjoining bath. For each pair of such sections, 
one above the other, there is a private outside entrance. 
There are no halls except those necessary to connect each 
group of four rooms with the outside entrance and the bath. 
This dormitory was completed in 1939. Prospective students 
are urged to inspect the building at their convenience. It is 
open every day in the week, including Sunday. The new 
dormitory and the stadium and Memorial Hall Annex, 
already referred to, provide accommodations for 234 men. 
Beckham Hall is named for the late J. C. W. Beckham, who 
was governor of Kentucky when Eastern Teachers College 
was founded. McCreary Hall is named for James B. 
McCreary, a Richmond citizen, who twice served the state 
as chief executive. Miller Hall is named for Robert W. 
Miller, a Madison Countian, who introduced in the lower 
house of the General Assembly a bill establishing Eastern. 

Fitzpatrick Arts Building 

The Fitzpatrick Arts Building was constructed in 1939 
and houses three departments of the college: industrial arts, 
home economics, and art. Modern machinery and the latest 
teaching equipment are available to students taking work 
in any of the departments housed in this building. It is 
named for the Honorable H. D. Fitzpatrick who is a member 
of the Board of Regents of the college. 

Home Economics Practice House 

The home economics practice house is a two-story, nine- 
room house which was purchased by the college in 1940 
and remodeled to provide comfortable and convenient 
facilities for those students in the home economics depart- 
ment who take the laboratory course in home management. 
Here the girls live and work together for about nine weeks, 



32 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

co-operatively preparing their own meals, marketing, 
entertaining their guests, and making a delightful home for 
themselves. 

Johnson Student Union Building 

Eastern's newest and finest building is the Keen John- 
son Student Union Building. It was opened in February, 
1940. No better statement concerning the uses of this build- 
ing could be found than that expressed in the dedication: 

"To the sacred fostering of beautiful friendships, 
unchanging in their devotion; to the daily formation of 
character to be used as a shield against the uncounted fears 
and accusations of an unknown world; to culture, that 
attribute of an abundant life, measured by its utility and 
bringing about universal concord and beauty of action; to 
the pursuit of happiness, a happiness of graceful courtesies, 
snatches of lilting conversations, the music of young voices 
and young laughter, and the everyday delight in beautiful 
things; to life together, its countless intimacies, its ceaseless 
energies, its consistency, co-operation, and clearness of 
vision; to the youth that were, to the youth that are, to the 
youth that will be, 

WE DEDICATE THIS BUILDING." 

Student and faculty club rooms, recreation halls, Little 
Theatre, student post office, bookstore, soda fountain and 
grill, dining halls, and a spacious reception room are the 
physical features of the building designed to accomplish 
the fine purposes set forth in the dedication. It was named 
in honor of Kentucky's present governor who has served on 
the Board of Regents since 1936. 

Today the college plant includes eighteen beautiful and 
well-equipped buildings located on more than 223 acres of 
bluegrass land, valued at approximately $3,250,000, all of 
which is dedicated to the free public education of the youth 
of Kentucky. 



CATALOG 1940-41 33 

EXPENSES 

The total expenses for one semester of 18 weeks at 
Eastern need not exceed $135.00. This figure is based on 
the following itemized statement: Incidental fee, $25.00; 
board, $63.00; room rent, $30.00; books and supplies, $12.00; 
and miscellaneous fees, $5.00. Since room, board, and books 
are variables, it is possible for one's expenses to be either 
more or less than the above estimate. Room rent varies 
from $1.00 per week to $2.25 for the girls, and from $1.50 
to $2.25 for the boys. Students living in the dormitories 
are expected to take their meals in the college cafeteria. 
The board, therefore, depends on the individual needs and 
desires of the student. Board varies from $3.00 to $5.00 per 
week. 

Students wishing to take private music lessons must 
also add the music fees to the above estimate in calculating 
the total expenses for a semester. Music fees are listed in 
the section of this catalog dealing with music courses. 

Expenses for terms of less than 18 weeks are approxi- 
mately proportional to those for 18 weeks. For example, the 
expenses for a five-week term are approximately one third 
as much as for those for an 18-week term, and for a 9-week 
term about one half as much as for 18 weeks. 

Approximately one half of the expenses due for a 
semester must be paid at the time of enrollment. The 
remainder of the amount due is paid in three installments 
equally spaced throughout the semester. 

All expenses for a summer term or spring term are to 
be paid at the time of enrollment. 

Miscellaneous Fees. — The item of miscellaneous fees 
listed in the above estimate of total expenses includes several 
small fees which are here listed and explained. It should be 
remembered that a student does not necessarily have to pay 
every fee that is here listed. The number of fees which a 
student must pay is determined largely by the courses taken. 

Tuition — Tuition Is Free to Residents of Kentucky. — The 
tuition for nonresidents of Kentucky is $15.00 per semester 
of 18 weeks, $7.50 for 9 weeks, and $7.50 for 5 weeks. 

E. S. T. C— 2 



34 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Laboratory Fees. — The fees to be paid for laboratory 
courses are indicated in connection with descriptions of these 
courses in another part of this catalog. Laboratory fees 
cover the cost of materials and laboratory service furnished. 

Breakage Deposit. — Students who enroll for courses in 
biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and for laboratory 
courses in health are required to pay a breakage deposit of 
$2.00 per course. In case of breakage or damage to laboratory 
apparatus, deductions are made from this deposit to cover 
such damage. This deposit is refunded at the end of the 
semester. 

Locker, Lock, Towel, Uniform Rental, and Laundry 
Service. — Students who use lockers in the Weaver Health 
Building are required to pay a rental of $2.25 per semester or 
term for use of locker, combination lock for locker, and towel. 
This fee includes laundry service for towels, bathing suits 
and gymnasium uniforms for the entire semester or term. 

Fee for Use of Radio. — Students who own radios and use 
them in the dormitory rooms are required to pay a fee of 
$1.00 per semester or term to cover the cost of operation. 

Laundry and Linen Service Fee. — Students who occupy 
dormitory rooms pay a fee of $2.00 for each semester, $1.00 for 
the nine-week spring term, and $1.00 for each five-week 
summer term for laundry and linen service. This fee covers 
the rental charge for sheets and pillow cases furnished by 
the college and provides laundry service for them. 

Athletic Fee. — Students who enroll for the fall semester 
pay an athletic fee of $2.00 for the school year. Students who 
enter the institution at the beginning of the second semester 
pay an athletic fee of $1.00 for the semester. 

Fee for Late Registration. — Students who register after 
the first two days of a semester or term are required to pay 
a late registration fee of $2.00. 

Fee for Change of Schedule.— A fee of $1.00 will be 
charged for each voluntary change which a student makes 
in his schedule after it has been prepared and approved at 
the time of registration. 

Graduation Fee. — Each student who receives the bacca- 
laureate degree pays a fee of $7.50. This fee covers cost of 



CATALOG 1940-41 35 

diploma, cap and gown rental, and other expenses incidental 
to graduation. 

Special Examination Fee. — Students to whom it is neces- 
sary to give a special examination after the regular sched- 
uled time for same will be charged a fee of 50c. A special 
examination is defined as any examination other than 
examinations for entrance, course examinations, and 
examinations for advanced standing. 

Fee for Transcript. — Each student will be given one tran- 
script of his work without charge. There will be a fee of 
$1.00 for each additional transcript after the first one has 
been furnished. 

OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A limited number of students may earn a part of their 
expenses by doing various kinds of jobs for the college 
cafeteria, book store, post office, dormitories, information 
office, farm, etc. Some students may also secure part-time 
employment in Richmond stores, restaurants, and other 
business establishments. 

Students are advised not to enter expecting employment 
of this kind unless they have arranged for it in advance. All 
applications for student employment should be addressed 
to: The Dean, Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College, 
Richmond, Kentucky. As a general rule students should 
enter Eastern prepared to pay all their expenses for at least 
one semester. 

LOANS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND SPECIAL AWARDS 

Loans. — The student loan fund of the Eastern Kentucky 
State Teachers College is designed to help worthy students 
complete their education. It has been augmented from time 
to time by gifts from different individuals and organizations 
and is being increased annually. Small loans are available 
to upper-class students. Those having high scholarship 
records will be given preference in the granting of loans. 
This fund makes it possible for a worthy student to borrow 
a small amount of money on a personal note at a legal rate 
of interest. Students who desire further information con- 
cerning this fund should get in touch with the Chairman 
of the Student Aid Committee. 



36 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

William Davis Scholarships. — Under the provisions of 
the will of the late William Davis of Newport, Kentucky, a 
sum of money was left for the benefit of students living in 
the Lona Estella Davis school district of Rowan County, to 
be used as scholarships at the Eastern Kentucky State 
Teachers College. These scholarships of $200.00 each are 
awarded by the superintendent of Rowan County Schools 
and the president of the Eastern Kentucky State Teachers 
College. A student desiring to secure one of these scholar- 
ships should make application to the superintendent of 
Rowan County Schools, 

Music Scholarships. — The college awards annually three 
scholarships of $54.00 each to those students who make the 
most satisfactory progress in piano, voice, and violin. 

Science Club Medal. — The Science Club presents 
annually a medal to that senior majoring in any of the 
sciences who has achieved the highest standing in science 
during his college course. 

Regents Medal for Oratory. — The Regents of the college 
present annually a medal for the best oration given by a 
college student under the direction of the proper authorities. 

ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS 

Living Regulations. — Both men and women students are 
required to occupy dormitory rooms while rooms are avail- 
able on the campus. After the dormitories are filled, 
students may take rooms in private homes in Richmond, but 
should not engage rooms without first consulting the Dean 
of Women or the Dean of Men. Students when living off the 
campus are required to room in homes approved by the 
college. 

All students not living in their own homes, whether 
rooming in the dormitories, in private homes, or rooming 
houses, are alike subject to the regulations, control and 
supervision of the college. 

Positively no cooking, storage or serving of food will be 
permitted in dormitory rooms. Any student violating this 
rule may be asked to release his or her room and in the case 
of such release of room, no room rent will be refunded. 



CATALOG 1940-41 



37 



Dormitory Rooms for Women Students. — Eastern has 
comfortable and convenient dormitory accommodations for 
528 students. Practically all dormitory rooms are equipped 
to provide living quarters for two students; however, there 
are a few corner rooms in which three students may live. 
Each suite of two rooms in the central and south sections 
of Burnam Hall has a private bath. Central bathrooms are 
located on each floor of Sullivan Hall and the north section 
of Burnam Hall. 

Rate of Room Rent for Women Students. — The rate of 
room rent varies according to the location, furnishings, 
equipment, and the number of students occupying a room. 

BURNAM HALL— 

Front rooms $2.25 per week per student 

Outside rooms — South Section 2.00 

Inside rooms — on court 1.80 

Front rooms — North section 1.50 

All other rooms — North section 1.35 

New addition 2.00 

SULLIVAN HALL— 

Front rooms $1.35 to $1.50 per week per student 

All other rooms except fourth floor.. 1.35 " " " " 

Rooms on fourth floor 1.00 " " 

Dormitory Rooms for Men Students. — The dormitories 
for men at Eastern will accommodate 234 students. Most of 
the rooms accommodate two students. There are a few 
three-student rooms. 

Rate of Room Rent for Men Students. — Room rent varies 
according to the facilities provided. 

MEMORIAL HALL— 

Rent of rooms in this hall ranges from $1.50 to $1.80 per week 
per student. 

BECKHAM HALL, McCREARY HALL, AND MILLER HALL— 

All rooms in these three halls rent for $2.00 per week per 
student. Janitorial service for any room may be had for 25c 
per week extra. 

Dormitory Room Reservations. — Students desiring to 
have rooms reserved in the dormitories should write the 



38 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS C(X.LEGE 

Assistant Director of Extension for application card. When 
applying for dormitory reservations, student should mention 
the price of room preferred. 

Applications for room reservations are filed in the order 
in which they are received, and in that order rooms are 
assigned. Rooms for the fall semester can generally be 
assigned promptly upon receipt of applications. Room 
reservations for the second semester and summer school can- 
not be made until the number of students vacating the 
dormitories at the close of the preceding term is determined. 
Frequently it is necessary to defer issuing assignments for 
the second semester and summer school until a short time 
before the beginning of these terms. 

Room reservations are void unless claimed by 12:30 P. M. 
of the opening day of the semester or term, and the fee is 
forfeited. Room reservations are not transferable. 

Room Deposit. — When the room assignment is received 
by the student, a room deposit fee of $5.00 must be paid 
within ten days to make the reservation permanent. This 
fee is retained by the college, as a guarantee of the proper 
care of room and furnishings, until the termination of the 
student's stay in the dormitory, at which time the whole, or 
such part of it as may be due after deduction for damage is 
made, will be refunded to the student. 

Room reservation fees should not be sent until dormitory 
assignments have been received. A room reservation fee 
will be refunded only when receipt is surrendered not later 
than ten days before the opening of the term or semester. 

Off-Campus Rooms for Students. — A number of homes 
in Richmond are equipped to take care of students who are 
unable to secure rooms in the dormitories. A few of these 
homes have apartments and facilities for light housekeeping. 
Furnished and unfurnished homes may be rented by married 
couples or families. Students interested in renting off- 
campus rooms may secure a list of those approved by the 
college by writing to the Assistant Director of Extension. 

BOARD 

All students who live in the dormitories are expected 
to take their meals in the college cafeteria. Those students 



CATALOG 1940-41 39 

living off the campus may take their meals in the cafeteria. 
Meal ticket books containing $5.00 in script may be purchased 
for $4.60. Coupon books bought in quantities may be left 
with the college cashier, to avoid losing, and checked out as 
needed. For an estimate of the cost of board for one 
semester, refer to the section in this catalog dealing with 
expenses. 

BOOK STORE 
The college book store is located on the ground floor of 
the Student Union Building. It is operated by the college 
and provides books and classroom supplies to students at 
reasonable prices. 

COLLEGE POST OFFICE 

The college post office provides mail service for all 
students who live in the dormitories. An individual lock 
box is assigned to each person. The post office is located 
on the ground floor of the Student Union Building. Students 
receiving their mail through the college post office should 
have all mail addressed in the following manner: Mr. John 
Smith, Box 231, College Post Office, Eastern Teachers 
College, Richmond, Kentucky. 

Students with off-campus rooms do not receive their 
mail through the college post office. Their mail should be 
addressed to the house in which they are living. 

GROUP HEALTH SERVICE 

The Department of Health at Eastern, under the direction 
of a full-time physician and a registered nurse, provides 
group health service for every student. The service includes 
an annual physical examination for each student, medical 
advice and attention at all times, immunizations against 
contagious diseases, limited hospitalization, and classes in 
first aid, safety, and personal and community hygiene. The 
health program at Eastern emphasizes preventive treatment. 
During each school year, the Health Department gives about 
1,000 tuberculin tests, 1,200 immunizations against contagious 
diseases, and 1,600 physical examinations, and makes over 
1,600 dormitory, home, and hospital visits. No charge is 
made for any of these services to the students. 



40 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Athletics. — Eastern has intercollegiate athletic teams in 
football, basketball, baseball, track, tennis, and swimming. 
These teams participate in a schedule of contests with other 
college teams each year. Eastern is a member of the Ken- 
tucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and the Southern 
Intercollegiate Athletic Association. All official intercol- 
legiate athletic events in which the college participates are 
governed by the rules and regulations of these two 
organizations. 

Play and Recreation. — Eastern affords its students 
opportunities for play and recreation. Recreational 
activities are required of all freshmen and sophomores. 
These activities, offered during school hours, are varied and 
seasonal. The aims are to develop regular habits of play, 
physical strength, vigor, and sportsmanship. The utilitarian 
values of participation in such activities are stressed. 
Sports, such as playground baseball, volley ball, soccer, 
speedball, hockey, lacrosse, track and field archery, hand- 
ball, lower organized games and their modifications, are 
offered. 

Every student has an opportunity to participate in the 
leisure-time activities which are offered in seasonal tourna- 
ments. These tournaments are organized through the 
medium of classes, societies, and recreational sections. 

The Swimming Pool. — The swimming pool in the 
Weaver Health Building serves both the college and the 
training school students. Only those officially connected 
with the institution are permitted to use the pool. A com- 
plete physical examination and a health certificate are 
required for admission. Students who expect to use the 
pool should see the college physician and arrange to take a 
complete physical examination. Regulation cotton bathing 
suits are required. Admission to the pool is strictly accord- 
ing to schedule. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The student organizations, societies, and clubs at East- 
ern are varied enough in their activities to include the 
interests of all the students. While the membership in them 



CATALOG 1940-41 41 

is voluntary, all students find it to their advantage to 
identify themselves with at least one of these activ^ities. 
Students receive in these extra-curricular activities a type 
of training which is impossible for them to get in the class 
room. The opportunity for social V' -^^nng the stude;^ i^ 
at>-,^.^ ' ^^"^ ^ofessional a^'^ counselor 

and friend oi those m xx.l ^xoup. -^ axxng tiie critical months 
when the students find it difficult to adjust themselves to 
college life, the faculty advisers have frequent conferences 
with those in their respective groups. Detailed reports 
on these conferences are made to the Dean of the Faculty, 
who is chairman of the Personnel and Guidance Committee. 
Such reports, together with personal data which have been 
assembled concerning each student, form the basis of advice 
and counsel. The personal data include test scores, high 
school record, family history, health records, and other 
information. 

READING LABORATORY 

The ability to read rapidly and well has much to do with 
a student's success in college. Studies have shown that 
large numbers of students in high school and college are 
being forced to drop out of school because they cannot read 
efficiently. As a means of helping those students who can- 
not read efficiently. Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College 
maintains a reading laboratory in which the reading 
difficulties of students are diagnosed and remedial pro- 
cedures followed. At present, only those freshman students 
who show by the results of a screening test that they have 
reading difficulties are assigned regular laboratory periods; 
however, many upperclassmen who wish to improve their 
reading ability receive guidance and assistance from the 
laboratory. 

STUDENT WELFARE 

Eastern is responsible to the State for the character and 
scholarship of its graduates — those who are to teach in the 
public schools. The institution will, therefore, ask students 
to withdraw if they are found unfit or in any way unworthy 
to become teachers. 



42 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
PUBLICATIONS 

The Milestone.— The Milestone is the college annual 
published each year by representatives of the Senior Class. 
This pubhcation contains photographic and statistical 
tuclOjds of all organizations and events of the college year. 
IntercoUegimnsists^ of an editor-in-chief, ^associate ^^ed^-^" 

legiate athletic events in which the college participates are 
governed by the rules and regulations of these two 
organizations. 

Play and Recreation. — Eastern affords its students 
opportunities for play and recreation. Recreational 
activities are required of all freshmen and sophomores. 
These activities, offered during school hours, are varied and 
seasonal. The aims are to develop regular habits of play, 
physical strength, vigor, and sportsmanship. The utilitarian 
values of participation in such activities are stressed. 
Sports, such as playground baseball, volley ball, soccer, 
speedball, hockey, lacrosse, track and field archery, hand- 
ball, lower organized games and their modifications, are 
offered. 

Every student has an opportunity to participate in the 
leisure-time activities which are offered in seasonal tourna- 
ments. These tournaments are organized through the 
medium of classes, societies, and recreational sections. 

The Swimming Pool. — The swimming pooj in the 
Weaver Health Building serves both the college and the 
training school students. Only those officially connected 
with the institution are permitted to use the pool. A com- 
plete physical examination and a health certificate are 
required for admission. Students who expect to use the 
pool should see the college physician and arrange to take a 
complete physical examination. Regulation cotton bathing 
suits are required. Admission to the pool is strictly accord- 
ing to schedule. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The student organizations, societies, and clubs at East- 
ern are varied enough in their activities to include the 
interests of all the students. While the membership in them 



CATALOG 1940-41 43 

STUDENT GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL 

The purpose of the personnel program at Eastern is to 
help students solve their personal, social, and academic 
problems. At the beginning of the freshman year, the 
students are divided into small groups, and each group is 
assigned to a faculty member, who becomes the counselor 
and friend of those in his group. During the critical months 
when the students find it difficult to adjust themselves to 
college life, the faculty advisers have frequent conferences 
with those in their respective groups. Detailed reports 
on these conferences are made to the Dean of the Faculty, 
who is chairman of the Personnel and Guidance Committee. 
Such reports, together with personal data which have been 
assembled concerning each student, form the basis of advice 
and counsel. The personal data include test scores, high 
school record, family history, health records, and other 
information. 

READING LABORATORY 

The ability to read rapidly and well has much to do with 
a student's success in college. Studies have shown that 
large numbers of students in high school and college are 
being forced to drop out of school because they cannot read 
efficiently. As a means of helping those students who can- 
not read efficiently. Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College 
maintains a reading laboratory in which the reading 
difficulties of students are diagnosed and remedial pro- 
cedures followed. At present, only those freshman students 
who show by the results of a screening test that they have 
reading difficulties are assigned regular laboratory periods; 
however, many upperclassmen who wish to improve their 
reading ability receive guidance and assistance from the 
laboratory. 

STUDENT WELFARE 

Eastern is responsible to the State for the character and 
scholarship of its graduates — those who are to teach in the 
public schools. The institution will, therefore, ask students 
to withdraw if they are found unfit or in any way unworthy 
to become teachers. 



44 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

But few rules and regulations are necessary. Students 
are to be ladies and gentlemen under all circumstances. 
This is the chief requirement. Parents may send their boys 
and girls here with the assurance that their safety, their 
general culture and their education will be carefully 
guarded. 

ASSEMBLY PROGRAMS 

The assembly programs constitute an integral part of the 
work of the institution. They have been given the unquali- 
fied support and endorsement of the Board of Regents, the 
president, faculty, and students. Students are required to 
attend these programs. At a meeting of the Board of Regents 
on March 14, 1931, the following resolution concerning 

assembly programs was passed: 

Be It Resolved: That it is the opinion of the Board of 

Regents that the assembly programs are a vital part of the 
instruction offered by the institution. Through such pro- 
grams as are given at the assembly period, ideals are 
created, information disseminated, professional attitudes 
established, culture of many types brought to students, and 
school spirit developed. Because of its fundamental value 
we expect both students and faculty members to attend 
these programs. In the event a student refuses to attend 
the assembly programs without being excused, we authorize 
the President to use such disciplinary measures as he may 
in his judgment deem expedient to secure cooperation and 
attendance from such student. 

Students are allowed three absences each semester 
without penalty. This is for the purpose of taking care of 
absences due to business or to illness which does not require 
the services of the College Physician. The schedule of 
penalties for failure to attend assembly programs is as 
follows: 

Number of Absences Quality Point Deduction 

4 1 

5 1% 

6 2 

7 2^ 

8 3 

9 31^ 
10 4 

One point will be deducted for each absence after the tenth. 



CATALOG 1940-41 45 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Graduation from an accredited high school with two 
majors, one of which shall be English, and a minor is 
required for admission to the freshman class. A minimum 
of three units is required for a major and a minimum of two 
units is required for a minor. 

Applicants for admission who have completed high 
school work at non-accredited secondary schools may be 
admitted by examination in this institution. 

Experienced teachers over twenty-one years of age who 
are unable to meet entrance requirements stated above are 
admitted to such work as they are qualified to take, but no 
certificate will be recommended or degree issued until all 
requirements, including entrance requirements, shall have 
been met. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Candidates for advanced standing will be given credit on 
work earned in accredited institutions when the work is 
officially certified by the Registrar of the institution. The 
amount of credit allowed will depend on the quality of the 
work and on the extent to which it corresponds to the 
requirements in the curriculum to be followed at Eastern. 

Credit will not be allowed on courses carrying a grade 
below "C" unless the student has taken the sequent course 
and made a grade of "C" or better. In no case will the 
credit allowed exceed the number of quality points. 

Students classified as juniors or seniors in this institution 
who wish to take work in other colleges to meet require- 
ments for the degree should secure the permission of the 
Dean or Registrar before enrolling for the work. 

NUMBERING OF COURSES 

Courses are numbered according to the following 
scheme: 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 inclusive are primarily for freshmen. 
Courses numbered 200 to 299 inclusive are primarily for sopho- 
mores. 
Courses numbered 300 to 399 inclusive are primarily for juniors. 
Courses numbered 400 to 499 inclusive are primarily for seniors. 
Courses numbered 500 to 599 inclusive are for graduate students. 



Meaning 

Excellent 


Grade Points 

per Semester 

Hour 

3 


Good 




2 


Average 

Poor 

Failure 




1 




Incomplete 
Conditioned 







46 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
GRADING SYSTEM 

Grades are indicated by letters, to each of which is 
given a certain value in "grade points". The following is the 
interpretation placed upon the grading system: 



Grade 
A 
B 
C 
D 
F 
I 
Z 

The grades A, B, C, D, and F, cannot be changed by the 
instructor. A grade of "D" gives credit toward a certificate 
or a degree if with such credits the student's standing is 1 or 
more. A grade of "I" shall be assigned only upon condition 
the student has been unable to complete the course on time 
because of unavoidable conditions. A grade of "I" must be 
made complete within one month after the student re-enters 
the institution. All grades of "I" automatically become "F" 
if not completed at the end of a year. The grade of "Z" shall 
represent a degree of attainment inferior to that of a "D" and 
shall not entitle the student to any credit but shall promote 
him to a sequent course in the same department specified by 
the instructor or head of the department. On completion of 
this sequent course with a grade of *'D" or higher, the mark 
of "Z" shall be changed automatically to a grade of "D". 

The standing of a student is defined as the ratio of his 
total number of "grade points" to his total number of 
semester hours credit. In order for a student to fulfill the 
requirements for a certificate or a degree he must offer a 
number of "grade points" at least as great as the number 
of semester hours. 

EXPLANATION OF CREDITS 

All work in the college is measured in semester hours, a 
semester hour being eighteen fifty-minute recitations. 
College subjects have different values determined by the 



CATALOG 1940-41 47 

number of hours of recitations per week. The semester 
hour value of each course is stated in the catalog. 

STUDENT LOAD 

The normal load for a semester for undergraduate 
students is sixteen semester hours exclusive of Physical 
Education 110. The minimum load to be classed as a full- 
time student is twelve semester hours. Students with an 
established record of superior quality may take a maximum 
of nineteen hours provided the application is properly 
approved at the time of registration. 

The normal load for a summer term for undergraduate 
students is six semester hours. The minimum load to be 
classed as a full-time student is four semester hours. 
Students with an established record of superior quality may 
take a maximum of seven semester hours provided the 
application is properly approved at the time of registration. 

STANDARD OF WORK 

For a semester the minimum standard of achievement 
which enables a student to re-enroll without question in the 
college is eight semester hours credit and ten grade points. 

(a) Failure to meet these minimum standards shall 
automatically exclude the student from subsequent registra- 
tion except in the case of a beginning freshman. Such 
freshman may be registered for such load as the Registrar 
may assign provided the load shall not be less than 9 
semester hours nor more than 19 semester hours in a 
semester. In each such case of re-registration a specific 
authorization of load shall be entered on record by the 
Registrar. Students admitted under this provision are 
automatically placed on probation for the semester. Failure 
during the probation period to meet the minimum standards 
makes the student ineligible for re-enrollment the following 
semester or term except as provided in (c). 

(b) The foregoing rule setting forth automatic 
exclusion because of failure to meet the minimum standards 
may be waived by a permanent committee appointed by the 
President and authorized to exercise such waiver. The 
committee at its discretion may waive the rule and authorize 



48 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

the re-registration of persons with credit sufficient to classify 
them above the freshman year in case such persons fail to 
meet the minimum standards in one semester. 

(c) The committee at its discretion may permit by 
waiver the re-registration of a person in the freshman year 
after that person has been re-admitted once and has had 
a load assigned by the Registrar as provided in (a) above 
and has failed the second time to meet the minimum 
standard. 

WITHDRAWALS 

Occasionally home conditions or some other factor make 
it necessary for students to withdraw. In such cases the 
student must see the President and arrange for the with- 
drawal. Any student who quits school or withdraws without 
securing the approval of the President may not register 
again unless the President sees fit to reinstate him. 

OFFICIAL SCHEDULE CHANGES 

The college reserves the right to cancel a course when 
the registration is not sufficient to warrant its continuance, 
to divide classes if the enrollment is too large for efficient 
instruction, and to change instructors when necessary. 
Additional courses will be organized if the demand is 
sufficient. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Commencements are held at the close of the academic 
year and at the end of the summer school. Students who 
are candidates for degrees are required to participate in 
the Commencement exercises unless excused by the Presi- 
dent. A student who satisfies the requirements for a de- 
gree at times other than at the end of the second semester 
or the close of the summer school will receive his degree 
immediately following the completion of the work and will 
be regarded as a member of the graduating class imme- 
diately succeeding the completion of the work. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The purpose of the Alumni Association is to promote 
fellowship among the ever-increasing number of graduates 
and to stimulate a mutual interest between the institution 
and her former students. 



CATALOG 1940-41 49 

All graduates and former students are considered mem- 
bers of the Alumni Association. Those who pay dues of 
$1.00 per year are active members. All others are classed 
as inactive. 

EXTENSION DIVISION 

Through the Extension Division Eastern provides a 
Bureau of Appointments, correspondence courses, extension 
class instruction, lectures, and various other types of public 
school service. 

Bureau of Appointments. — A placement bureau is 
maintained by the college to assist stw^nts and-ex-students 
in obtaining positions and to aid superintendents, prin- ' 

cipals, and other public school officials to secure the best 
qualified individuals to fill their vacancies. No charge is 4 1 
made for this service. 



Correspondence Courses. — Correspondence courses are 
prepared and conducted by regular members of the faculty 
and are, in so far as possible, identical with resident courses.^ 
For further details see Extension Division bulletin or write 
Director of Extension Division for additional information. 

Extension Classes. — Regular members of the faculty 
conduct extension classes in cities and communities where 
teachers desire to pursue work in class groups in practically 
the same way as they would in residence. The cost of 
extension-class instruction is reasonable. For further details 
see Extension Division bulletin or write Director of 
Extension Division for additional information. 

Restrictions on Extension Work. — A maximum of thirty- 
two hours of the required 128 hours for a Bachelor's degree 
may be earned by extension. One half of the work required 
for renewal of a certificate may be earned by extension. 

A student may earn a maximum of twelve hours by 
extension during the year, and a student may not earn more 
than six hours by extension during a semester if he is 
teaching full time. Those who plan to teach and take 
extension work should distribute the work over the year 
rather than waiting until the second semester to begin. 
Those who are not teaching and teachers whose schools have 



^ 
^ 



50 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

closed are not limited to the six hours per semester but are 
limited to the twelve hours per year. 

During the summer a student may not earn more than 
thirteen hours from June 1 to September 1, This includes 
all work, whether extension or residence or a combination 
of extension and residence. 

Correspondence credit is recorded as having been 
earned at the time of completion of the final test. The above 
restrictions are statewide and apply to all institutions alike. 



/ 



THE TRAINING SCHOOL 

The campus laboratory school enrolls about 340 pupils 
and has fourteen supervising teachers. Its organization 
includes the elementary training school of six grades 
located in Cammack building; the Model High School of six 
grades located in the old University building; and the Rural 
Demonstration School of eight grades and one teacher 
situated near by on the college farm. The Richmond City 
School is affiliated for purposes of providing extended 
facilities in student teaching. 

Children who attend the Training School come from the 
city and county in the surrounding community. The number 
of pupils for each grade is limited to thirty. A fee of eight 
dollars a year is charged in the elementary school and twelve 
dollars a year in high school. The rural school charges no 
fee. It is operated under contract with the Madison County 
Board of Education. 

The first consideration in the administration of the 
Training School is to make of it a superior school for the 
children who attend it. Its value to the State in the training 
of teachers depends upon the quality of its work and how 
well the needs of children are met. 

Its philosophy and procedures are learned by teachers in 
training through directed observation and supervised 
practice. This is not a frontier school, but its aim is to 
exemplify progressive trends in educational practice, trends 
which may be accepted as practicable by the more alert 
schools of the State, and which might influence many schools. 
A training school should lean forward constantly without 
losing balance. 

College students in professional courses and in pro- 
fessionalized or special methods courses come into the Train- 
ing School by appointment to observe. A limited number of 
students preparing to meet the requirements for a "Pro- 
visional Elementary Certificate" spend a half day in the 
school observing and participating for half a semester. The 



52 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

school is used to a limited extent for experimental work in 
which college students generally participate. 

Student Teaching. — Supervised student teaching is done 
in the Training School or in affiliated public schools. 
Students wanting to do student teaching are expected to 
make formal application by filling out a special blank form 
secured from the Director. They must have had as much 
as one semester of residence work at Eastern, and all college 
credits should be on file in the Registrar's office. They must 
also meet certain standards in general scholarship, special 
academic preparation, use of English, health, personality, and 
professional attitude. All applicants should make arrange- 
ments for the work before the opening of a term. 



CURRICULA 

Teacher-Education Curricula. — The curricula offered by 
the college have been planned and developed to meet the 
needs of students who desire to become teachers, super- 
visors, and administrators in the public schools. Curricula 
are offered for the preparation of elementary teachers; 
for teachers of the special subjects of agriculture, art, com- 
merce, health and physical education, industrial arts, music, 
and vocational home economics; and for the preparation of 
high school teachers in fields of biology, chemistry, English, 
French, geography and geology, history, Latin, mathematics, 
and physics. These curricula lead to the professional 
baccalaureate degrees. 

Non-Professional Curricula. — The college offers a special 
non-professional curriculum in the field of commerce. This 
curriculum provides adequate training in the field of com- 
merce (accounting, general business, and secretarial work) 
to meet the needs of students who desire to enter the field of 
business. 

A four-year curriculum in general education is offered 
by the college. Completion of this curriculum entitles the 
student to receive the non-professional baccalaureate degree. 

Pre-Professional Curricula — Pre-Medical, Pre-Law, Pre- 
Engineering, and the like. — The institution offers the courses 
needed by students who are preparing to enter medical 
schools, colleges of law, colleges of engineering, and the 
like. 

Students who take their pre-professional work at 
Eastern are able to satisfy the entrance requirements of the 
leading schools of medicine, colleges of law, colleges of 
engineering, and other professional institutions. 



PROGKAM OF STUDIES FOS FRESHMEN 

STUDENTS 

The college offers a wide variety of courses designed to 
meet the needs of first year students. In view of the fact that 
many beginning students have not decided what curriculum 
to follow, a program has been planned to include a consider- 
able amount of work in the field of general education, and 
at the same time afford an opportunity for the student to 
select courses to meet his particular needs. The program 
of studies recommended for the first year includes: 

FIRST SEMESTER 

English 101, Oral and Written Composition .... 3 semester hours 

History 141, History of Western Civilization .... 3 semester hours 

Science 110, Survey of Science 3 semester hours 

Library Science 166, Library Orientation 1 semester hour 

Physical Education 110a, Fundamental Physi- 
cal Education Activities 1/2 semester hour 



Total 101/2 semester hours 

SECOND SEMESTER 

English 102, Oral and Written Composition .... 3 semester hours 

History 142, History of Western Civilization .. 3 semester hours 

Science 111, Survey of Science 3 semester hours 

Physical Education 110b, Fundamental Phys- 
ical Education Activities Vz semester hour 

Total 9V2 semester hours 

In addition to the above courses, the student selects other 
work to make a total of approximately sixteen semester 
hours for each semester. It is expected that the student 
will select courses to fulfill the requirements of the cur- 
riculum he expects to follow. 

Each student is required to file in the Dean's office, 
before the close of the freshman year, the curriculum which 
he expects to complete to meet the requirements for a de- 
gree. This curriculum, when properly approved by the 
Dean of the college and major and minor professors, be- 



CATALOG 1940-41 55 

comes a contract between the student and the college. A 
student may change his program of study at any time, pro- 
vided the change is approved in writing. It is usually very 
difficult, however, to change the curriculum after the begin- 
ning of the junior year without increasing the amount of 
time necessary to earn the baccalaureate degree. 

DEGKEES 

Professional Degrees. — The Eastern Kentucky State 
Teachers College confers three professional degrees; namely, 
the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science degree, 
and the Master of Science degree in Education. 

Non-Professional Degrees. — Non-professional degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science are conferred by 
the college. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science is 
conferred upon those students who have completed an 
approved four-year curriculum. The minimum amount of 
credit required for the bachelor's degree is one hundred and 
twenty-eight semester hours of college credit exclusive of 
Physical Education 110. Not more than thirty-two semester 
hours of the work required for a degree may be earned by 
extension and/or correspondence. A candidate for a degree 
must have been in residence a minimum of thirty-six weeks 
(at least eighteen of which must have been in the senior 
year) and must have earned a minimum of thirty-two 
semester hours while in residence. 

The curriculum which the student expects to follow for 
the completion of the requirement for the bachelor's degree 
must be filed in the office of the Dean of the college not 
later than the end of the freshman year. In the case of 
transfer students the curriculum must be filed before the 
end of the first semester or term of resident work. The 
curriculum must be approved by the Dean of the college 
and by the major and minor professors. 

A minimum of forty per cent of the semester hours of credit 
offered in fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor's 
degree must de of senior college level. 



56 



EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



SPECIFIC REQUIKEMENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL 
DEGREES 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN 
COMMERCE 

This curriculum is planned for the student who expects 
to teach commerce in the high school and who desires to 
devote a major portion of his time to a study of the various 
phases of the field of commerce. The program submitted 
to meet the requirements for this curriculum must include 
the following courses: 

Departmental Requirements: 

English 101, 102, 218, 219 12 hrs 

Health 201 3 hrs. 

History 141, 142, 202, 203 12 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Mathematics 107, 113 6 hrs 

Physical Education 110 (four semesters), 

225 4 hrs 

Science 110, 111, (Biology, Chemistry, 
Geology, or Physics six semester 
hours) 12 hrs 

Major Requirements: 

Commerce 119, 120, 126, 131, 151, 152, 215, 
216, 221, 253, 301, 302, 303, 309, 370, 
371, 405, 461a, 461b, 470, 471 47 hrs^ 

Economics 124, 230, 231 9 hrs_ 

Professional Requirements 

Education 210, 301 or 421b, 314 or 464, 364, 

463 20 h rs 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

This curriculum is planned for the student who expects 
to teach in the elementary school and who desires to devote 
a major part of his time to preparation for this type of 
work. The program submitted to meet the requirements for 
this curriculum must include the following departmental 
requirements: 

Art 117, 217, 260 8 hrs 

Biology 121, Biology 261 or Geology 

201 7 hrs 

Commerce 131 no credit 




^C 



/ 



4 ■^l 

CATALOG 1940-41 57 jjZ^ 

Education 210, *267, 313, 354, 421a, 441, 

442, 463 33 hrs. 

English 101, 102, 163, 218, 219, 260 18 hrs. 



Geography 101, 271, 372 9 hrs. \ / 

Govprnmpnt 111 3 hrs _^--— ^ 



Government 111 3 hrs 

Health 201 3 hrs. 

History 141, 142, 202, 203 12. hrs. 

Industrial Arts 222 '2 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Mathematics 260 3 hrs ^ 

Music 255, 260, 263 7 hrs. 1 

Physical Education 110 (four semesters) 

220 4 hrs. 

Science 110, 111 6 hrs. 

Sociology 331 3 hrs. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

This curriculum is planned for the student who expects 
to teach industrial arts in the high school and who desires 
to devote a major portion of his time to a study of the 
various phases of the field of industrial arts. The program 
submitted to meet the requirements for this curriculum 
must include the following: 

Departmental Requirements: 

Art 117, 260 6 hrs. 

English 101, 102, 218, 219 '. 12 hrs. 

Health 201 3 hrs. 

History 141, 142, 202, 203 12 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Mathematics 107, 113 6 hrs. 

Physical Education 110 (four semesters), 

225 4 hrs. 

Physics 201, 202 10 hrs 

Science 110, 111 6 hrs 

Major Requirements: 

Industrial Arts 100, 141, 191, 233, 242, 280, 
292, 343, 361, 382, 383, 394, 466, and 
twelve hours elective 48 hrs. 

Professional Requirements: 

Education 210, 301 or 421b, 314 or 464,- 364, 

463 20 hrs. 

• Students transferring from other colleges should take Education 262, 
Fundamentals in Elementary Education, plus elective work in elementary 
education to make a total of eight semester hours to take the place of Edu- 
cation 267. 



58 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN 
VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS 

FIRST YEAR 
First Semester 

Art 117 — Elementary Drawing and Design 4 hrs. 

English 101 — Oral and Written Composition 3 hrs. 

Home Economics 101 — Textiles 2 hrs. 

Home Economics 155 — Elementary Costume Design .... 2 hrs. 

Library Science 166 — Library Orientation 1 hr. 

Science 110 — Survey of Science 3 hrs. 

Physical Education 110 — Fundamental Physical Educa- 
tion Activities 1/2 hr. 

151/2 hrs. 
Second Semester 

Biology 121 — General Biology 4 hrs. 

English 102 — Oral and Written Composition 3 hrs. 

Home Economics 102 — Source, Selection and Cost of 

Foods 2 hrs. 

Physics 102 — Household Physics 3 hrs. 

Science 111 — Survey of Science 3 hrs. 

Physical Education 110 — Fundamental Physical Educa- 
tion Activities V2 hr. 

151/2 hrs. 
SECOND YEAR 
First Semester 

Chemistry 111 — General Chemistry 5 hrs. 

Economics 230 — Principles of Economics 3 hrs. 

English 218 — Survey of Literature I 3 hrs. 

Health 201 — Public Hygiene and Safety 3 hrs. 

Home Economics 204 — Nutrition and Food Preparation 3 hrs. 
Physical Education 110 — Fundamental Physical Educa- 
tion Activities 1/2 hr. 

171/2 hrs. 
Second Semester 

Chemistry 112 — Inorganic Chemistry 5 hrs 

Education 210 — Educational Psychology 3 hrs. 

English 219 — Survey of Literature II 3 hrs 

Home Economics 203 — Garment Making 3 hrs. 

Home Economics 222 — Interior Decoration 2 hrs 

Physical Education 110 — Fundamental Physical Educa- 
tion Activities 1/2 hr. 

16 1/2 hrs 



CATALOG 1940-41 59 

THIRD YEAR 

First Semester 

Chemistry 220 — Bio-Organic Chemistry 4 hrs. 

Education 314 — Psychology of Adolescence 3 hrs. 

Home Economics 206 — Dressmaking 2 hrs. 

Home Economics 231 — Home Nursing 2 hrs. 

Home Economics 306 — Advanced Nutrition 3 hrs. 

Elective 2 hrs. 

16 hrs. 
Second Semester 

Education 364 — Fundamentals of Secondary Education 4 hrs. 

Health 303 — Applied Bacteriology 5 hrs. 

Home Economics 205 — Meal Planning and Table 

Service 3 hrs. 

Home Economics 304 — Materials and Methods for 

Teaching Vocational Home Economics 3 hrs. 

Elective 2 hrs. 

17 hrs. 

FOURTH YEAR 
First Semester 

Art 372— Applied Design 3 hrs. 

Education 463 — Student Teaching 8 hrs. 

Home Economics 401 — Dietetics 3 hrs. 

Sociology — Introduction to Sociology 3 hrs. 

17 hrs. 
Second Semester 

Biology 481 — Animal Physiology 4 hrs. 

Home Economics 402 — Child Development 3 hrs. 

Home Economics 403 — Home Management 4 hrs. 

Elective 5 hrs. 

16 hrs. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN SCIENCE 

Departmental Requirements: 

English 101, 102, 218, 219 12 hrs. 

Health 201 3 hrs. 

History 141, 142, 202, 203 12 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Matliematics 107, 113 6 hrs 

Physical Education 110 (four semesters), 

225 4 hrs. 

Science 110, 111 6 hrs. 



60 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Major Requirements: 

Courses listed in Group A, B, or C must be completed: 

GROUP A: 

Biology 121, 231, 232, 241, 242, 

334 or 335 22 hrs. 

Chemistry 111, 112 10 hrs. 

Geology 201 3 hrs. 

Physics 201, 202 10 hrs. 

Science 461 3 hrs. 

*Electives — Biology, Chemistry, 

Physics 6 hrs. 54 hrs. 

GROUP B: 

Chemistry 111, 112, 213, 216, 310 24 hrs. 
Biology 121 or 241, 231, 334 or 

335 10 hrs. 

Geology 201 3 hrs. 

Physics 201, 202 10 hrs. 

Science 461 3 hrs. 

*Electives — Biology, Chemistry, 

Physics 4 hrs. 54 hrs 

GROUP C: 

Physics 201, 202, 300, electives 

to make a minimum of 21 hrs. 

Biology 121 or 241, 231, 334 or 

335 10 hrs. 

Chemistry 111, 112 10 hrs. 

Geology 201 3 hrs. 

Science 461 3 hrs. 

*Electives — Biology, Chemistry 

Physics 7 hrs. 54 hrs 

Professional Requirements: 

Education 210, 301 or 421b, 314 or 464, 364, 

463 20 hrs 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN AGRI- 
CULTURE, BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, COMMERCE, HEALTH 
AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HOME ECONOMICS, 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS, MATHEMATICS, OR PHYSICS 

Major and Minor Requirements: 

A major and two minors or two majors must be com- 
pleted. A major is defined as a minimum of twenty-four 



* Science 110 and 111 may be used as elective Science. 



CATALOG 1940-41 61 

semester hours and a minor is defined as a minimum of 
eighteen semester hours. The amount of credit for majors 
and minors is not the same for all departments. 

The student must file in the office of the Dean of the 
college, not later than the end of the freshman year, the 
curriculum to be followed in completing the requirements 
for the degree. The curriculum must include minimum 
departmental requirements as follows: 

Departmental Requirements: 

English 101, 102, 218, 219 12 hrs. 

Health 201 3 hrs. 

History 141, 142, 202, 203 12 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Mathematics 107, 113 6 hrs. 

Physical Education 110 (four semesters), 

225 4 hrs. 

Science 110, 111 (Biology, Chemistry, 
Geology, or Physics six semester 
hours) 12 hrs. 

Professional Requirements: 

Education 210, 301 or 421b, 314 or 464, 364, 

463 20 hrs. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN ART, 

ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY, LATIN, GEOGRAPHY 

AND GEOLOGY, OR MUSIC 

Major and Minor Requirements: 

A major and two minors or two majors must be com- 
pleted. A major is defined as a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours and a minor is defined as a minimum of 
eighteen semester hours. The amount of credit for majors 
and minors is not the same for all departments. 

The student must file in the office of the Dean of the 
college, not later than the end of the freshman year, the 
curriculum to be followed in completing the requirements 
for the degree. The curriculum must include minimum 
departmental requirements as follows: 

Departmental Requirements: 

English 101, 102, 218, 219 12 hrs. 

♦Foreign Language 6 to 12 hrs. 

* If three vinits or more of a foreign language are offered for admission, 
six semester hours in the same language will be required; if two units of a 
foreign language are offered for admission, nine semester hours in the same 
language will be required; if one unit or less of a foreign language is offered 
for admission, twelve semester hours in the same language will be required. 



62 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Health 201 3 hrs. 

History 141, 142, 202, 203 12 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Physical Education 110 (four semes- 
ters), 225 4 hrs. 

Science 110, 111 (Biology, Chemistry, 

or Physics six semester hours) 12 hrs. 

Professional Requirements: 

Education 210, 301 or 421b, 314 or 464, 

364, 463 20 hrs. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN SOCIAL 

SCIENCE 
Departmental Requirements: 

English 101, 102, 218, 219 12 hrs. 

*Foreign Language 6 to 12 hrs. 

Geology 201 3 hrs. 

Health 201 3 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Physical Education 110 (four semester- 

ters), 225 4 hrs. 

Science 110, 111 (Biology, Chemistry, or 

Physics three semester hours) 9 hrs. 

Major Requirements: 

Economics 230, 231 6 hrs. 

Geography 101, 471, 271 or 372 9 hrs. 

Government 111, 311 6 hrs. 

History 141, 142, 202, 203, 340, 344 18 hrs. 

Sociology 331, 332 6 hrs. 

Electives — Economics, Geography, 

Government, History, Sociology .... 9 hrs. 

Professional Requirements: 

Education 210, 301 or 421b, 314 or 464, 

364, 463 20 hrs. 

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-PROFESSIONAL 

DEGREES 

The college offers a general education curriculum for 
students who are not interested in professional education, 

and for students who expect to prepare to enter the pro- 



* If three units or more of a foreign language are offered for admission, 
six semester hours in the same language will be required; if two units of a 
foreign language are offered for admission, nine semester hours in the same 
language will be required; if one unit or less of a foreign language is offered 
for admission, twelve semester hours in the same language will be required. 



CATALOG 1940-41 63 

fessions of medicine, law, engineering, and the like. A 
special curriculum is also offered in commerce to meet the 
needs of those students who desire to prepare for careers in 
the field of business and industry. The non-professional 
curricula do not prepare students to enter the profession of 
teaching. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN 
COMMERCE 

This curriculum is a special curriculum in the field of 
commerce and is designed to meet the needs of the student 
who expects to enter business rather than the field of 
education. The curriculum to be followed in completing 
the requirements for the degree is as follows: 

Departmental Requirements 

English 101, 102, 218, 219 12 hrs 

Government 111 3 hrs 

Health 100 2 hra 

History 141, 142, 202, 203 12 hrs 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Mathematics 107, 108 or 113, 342 7 to 8 hrs 

Physical Education 110 (four semes- 
ters) 2 hrs 

Science 110, HI (Biology, Chemistry, 
Geology, Physics, six semester 

hours) 12 hrs. 

Major Requirements: 

Commerce 119, 120, 126, 127, 131, 151, 
152, 221, 301, 309, 324, 325, 326, 370, 
371, 405, 406, 470, 471, nine hours 
elective 51 hrs 

Economics 124, 230, 231 9 hrs 



SPECIAL CURRICULUM IN GENERAL 
EDUCATION 

This curriculum is planned to meet the needs of those 
wishing to secure a general education without preparing 
to teach. The work may be planned to meet the require- 
ments for admission to professional schools of medicine, 
dentistry, and law. This curriculum should be planned and 
approved by the Dean before the end of the freshman year. 
Education courses cannot be counted toward meeting the 
requirements in this curriculum. 

The Minimum Requirements Are: 

English 101, 102, 218, 219, 163 or 231 or 301 15 hrs. 

History 141, 142 6 hrs. 

Library Science 166 1 hr. 

Physical Education 110 (foiir semesters) 2 hrs. 

Science 110, 111 6 hrs. 

Two majors of twenty-four hours each, or 

an area of forty-eight hours 48 hrs. 

Two minors of twelve hours each 24 hrs. 

Electives 25 hrs. 

Majors and minors may be selected from the following depart- 
ments: 

Agriculture History 

Art Home Economics (Non- 

Biology Vocational) 

Chemistry Industrial Arts 

French Latin 

German Mathematics 

Geography and Geology Music 

Health and Physical Physics 

Education Science 

Social Science 



THE GRADUATE DIVISION 

PURPOSE 

The Graduate Division offers work leading to the degree 
of Master of Arts in Education, The graduate program is 
planned to meet the needs of teachers, supervisors, and 
administrators of the public schools. The major field in the 
graduate program is that of professional education. Minors 
are offered in the departments of agriculture, art, biology, 
chemistry, commerce, economics, English, French, geography, 
health and physical education, history, home economics, 
industrial arts, Latin, mathematics, music, physics, and 
political science. Two types of graduate students are 
recognized: (1) Students who enter and become candidates 
for the degree of Master of Arts in Education; and (2) 
students who wish to broaden their education without 
reference to a graduate degree. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

(1) Applicants for admission to the Graduate Division 
must hold a Bachelor's degree from a standard institution 
and must have completed the requirements for a four-year 
curriculum for the education of elementary and/or secondary 
teachers, as prescribed by the Council on Public Higher 
Education of Kentucky. 

(2) Official credentials should be filed with the Regis- 
trar of the college before entrance. These credentials should 
include: (a) A complete transcript of high school credits; 
(b) a complete transcript of college or university credits. 

(3) Transferred credits shall not be used to reduce 
either the resident requirements or minimum number of 
semester hours required, 

(4) Admission to the Graduate Division does not neces- 
sarily imply admission to candidacy for the degree of Master 
of Arts in Education. 

E. S, T. C— 3 



66 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR THE MASTER OF ARTS 
DEGREE IN EDUCATION 

Application for admission to candidacy for the degree of 
Master of Arts in Education should be made to the Dean of 
the college not later than the tenth week prior to the date 
on which the degree is to be conferred. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE IN 
EDUCATION 

To complete the work for the degree of Master of Arts 
in Education, the candidate must satisfy the following 
requirements: 

(1) The student must complete thirty-six weeks, or the 
equivalent, in residence and earn a minimum of thirty 
semester hours, twenty-four of which shall be in regular 
course work, and write a thesis in the major field. 

(2) At least 50 per cent of all course work must be in 
courses open to graduate students only. The remainder of 
the work may be completed in upper division courses. 

(3) The student shall have an average standing of 2.0 
and no credit shall be granted for a grade below "C". 

(4) The student must complete a major in the field 
of education. A major shall require a minimum of twelve 
semester hours of course work in addition to a thesis in the 
major field. The thesis should show, among other things, 
the following characteristics: (a) Ability of candidate to 
work independently on an approved problem; (b) a reason- 
ably wide familiarity with the literature of the field of 
specialization; (c) a practical working knowledge of research 
methods; and (d) conclusions justified by supporting data. 

(5) The student must complete a minor. The minor 
shall be determined by the institution in terms of the stu- 
dent's need, provided that the minor, or minors, shall be in 
upper division and/or graduate courses. 

(6) The student shall pass both an oral and written 
examination on his major and minor fields. 

(7) The student must present a thesis at least three 
weeks before the degree is to be conferred. The thesis must 
be approved by the major and minor professors and by the 
Dean of the college and must conform to regulations 



CATALOG 1940-41 67 

approved by the graduate committee for writing theses. 
Two typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in the col- 
lege library at least one week before the degree is con- 
ferred. 

(8) Formal application for the degree of Master of Arts 
in Education must be filed with the Registrar not later than 
eight weeks before the degree is to be conferred. 

FEES 
The registration fee for graduate students is $3.00 per 
semester hour. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATES 

ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATES 

An elementary certificate is valid for use in any elemen- 
tary school in the state. 

(1) Provisional elementary certificate. — The provisional 
elementary certificate, valid for three years, shall be issued 
to a person who has completed the two-year curriculum 
for the training of elementary teachers. The provisional 
elementary certificate may be reissued or renewed after 
two years of teaching experience during the life of the cer- 
tificate or upon the presentation of one-half year (16 semes- 
ter hours) of additional work, earned during the life of the 
certificate, selected from the requirements for the standard 
elementary certificate and may be renewed thereafter upon 
the presentation of one-half year (16 semester hours) of 
additional credit selected from the requirements for the 
standard elementary certificate. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR COMPLETING THE CURRICULUM 
FOR THE PROVISIONAL ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATE 

This curriculum satisfies all requirements of the State 
Board of Education for the Provisional Elementary 
Certificate. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester 

English 101 — Oral and Written Composition 3 hrs. 

Geography 101 — Principles of Geography 3 hrs. 

History 141 — History of Western Civilization 3 hrs. 

Library Science 166 — Library Orientation 1 hr. 

Physical Education 110 — Ftindamental Physical 

Education Activities % hr. 

Science 110 — Survey of Science 3 hrs. 

Sociology 143 — ^Rural Sociology 3 hrs 

16% hrs. 
Second Semester 

English 102 — Oral and Written Composition 3 hrs. 

Government 111 — American Government and 

Citizenship 3 hrs 



CATALOG 1940-41 69 

History 142 — History of Western Civilization 3 hrs. 

Physical Education 110 — Fundamental Physical 

Education Activities - H hr. 

Science 111 — Survey of Science 3 hrS. 

Elective 4 hrs. 



16% hrs. 

SECOND YEAR 

First Semester 

Art 260— Public School Art 2 hrs. 

*Education 267 — Directed Observation and 

Participation in the Elementary School 8 hrs. 

i Education 210 — Educational Psychology ..3 hrs. 
English 260 — Literature for Children 3 hrs. 
Physical Education 220 — Plays and Games 

for Elementary Grades 2 hrs. 

8 hrs. 

English 218 — Survey of Literature I 3 hrs. 

Music 260 — Public School Music 2 hrs. 

Physical Education 110 — Fundamental Physical 

Education Activities Vz hr. 



15% hrs. 



Second Semester 

Education 203 — Principles of Teaching 3 hrs. 

♦Education 267 — Directed Observation and Participation 

in the Elementary School 8 hrs. 

I Education 210 — Educational Psychology ..3 hrs. 

or J English 260 — Literature for Children 3 hrs. 

( Physical Education 220 — Plays and Games 

for Elementary Grades 2 hrs. 

8 hrs. 



Health 201 — Public Hygiene and Safety 3 hrs. 

Mathematics 260 — Teachers' Arithmetic . 3 hrs 

Physical Education 110 — ^Fundamental Physical 

Education Activities % hr. 



17% hrs. 

(2) Standard elementary certificate. — The standard ele- 
mentary certificate, valid for four years, shall be issued to a 



• students who transfer college work from other institutions must take 
Education 262. Fundamentals in Elementary Education, and Education 265, 
Student Teaching, instead of Education 267, Directed Observation and Par- 
ticipation in the Elementary School. 



70 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

person who completes the four-year curriculum for a major 
in elementary education. This certificate may be reissued 
or renewed every four years after three years of teaching 
experience during the life of the certificate or upon the pres- 
entation of one-half year of standard college or university 
work of graduate grade. The standard elementary certifi- 
cate may be extended for life upon the presentation of 
evidence that the holder has had three years of teaching 
experience in the elementary field during the life of the 
certificate and has completed the requirements for the 
master's degree in a standard college or university. 

HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 

A high school certificate is valid for use in any high 
school in the state. 

(1) Provisional high school certificate. — The provisional 
high school certificate, valid for four years, shall be issued 
to a person who is a graduate of a standard four-year college 
or university and who has completed the four-year cur- 
riculum for the training of high school teachers. This 
certificate may be reissued or renewed every four years 
after three years of teaching experience during the life of 
the certificate or upon the presentation of one-half year of 
standard college or university work of graduate grade earned 
during the life of the certificate, 

(2) Standard high school certificate. — The standard high 
school certificate, valid for five years, shall be issued to a 
person who is a graduate of a standard four-year college or 
university and who has completed the four-year curriculum 
for the training of high school teachers and who, in addition 
thereto, has completed the requirements for the master's 
degree in a standard college or university. 

CERTIFICATES IN ADMINISTRATION AND 
SUPERVISION 

Certificates in administration and supervision are valid 
for use in any position of superintendent, principal, super- 
visor, teacher, or attendance officer. 

(1) Provisional certificate in administration and super- 
vision. — The provisional certificate in administration and 



CATALOG 1940-41 71 

supervision, valid for four years, shall be issued to a person 
who has had at least two years of successful teaching 
experience and who is a graduate of a standard four-year 
college or university and who has completed the four-year 
curriculum for the training of administrators and super- 
visors. The curriculum for the training of administrators 
and supervisors shall include in addition to the requirements 
for the training of elementary or high school teachers the 
following professional courses: 

Administration and Supervision 6 hrs. 

Elementary Education 6 hrs. 

Supervised Student Teaching 6 hrs. 

Secondary Education 6 hrs. 

This certificate may be reissued or renewed every four 
years after three years of experience during the life of the 
certificate or upon presentation of one-half year of standard 
college or university work of graduate grade. 

(2) Standard certificate in administration and supervision. 
— The standard certificate in administration and supervision, 
valid for five years, shall be issued to a person who has had 
at least two years of successful teaching experience and 
who is a graduate of a standard four-year college or univer- 
sity and who has completed the four-year curriculum for the 
training of administrators or supervisors, and who, in addi- 
tion thereto, has completed the requirements for the 
master's degree. The standard certificate in administration 
and supervision may be extended for life upon presentation 
of evidence that the holder has had three years of successful 
experience during the life of the certificate. 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER'S CERTIFICATE 

The certificate for attendance officers shall be issued to 
any person who completes a four-year curriculum for a 
teacher's certificate provided such curriculum includes at 
least three semester hours of pupil accounting. 



DIVISION OF APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Mr. Moore Miss Dix Mr. Lascoe 

Miss Burrier Miss Ford Mr. Richards 

Mr. Carter Miss Gill Miss Slater 

Mr. Deniston Mr. Gumbert Mr. Whalin 



AGRICULTURE 

Mr. Carter Mr. Gumbert 

Agriculture 100. Survey Course in Agricultuore. Two hours. 

Purpose: It is a course primarily designed for teachers and 
supervisors of rural schools. An attempt will be made to acquaint 
prospective teachers with the limitations and possibilities of their 
communities for better family living on the farm. Emphasis will 
be placed on the production of food crops, feed crops, and possible 
increases of cash income. 

Topics: Simpler principles of soil fertility, soil con- 
servation, improvement of pastures, feed crops, the dairy cow, sheep, 
poultry, and home killing and curing of pork. Emphasis is given 
to the importance of the farm garden, the production of fruit for 
the home and the storing of vegetables and fruit for winter. Time 
is devoted to the aids, methods, and materials for correlation on 
the elementary level. 

Agriculture 126. Farm Poultry. Three hours. 

Purpose: This course is planned to give the teacher the knowl- 
edge necessary to initiate the best methods in the establishment, 
improvement, care, feeding and management of poultry in his 
community. 

Topics: Breeds, poultry house construction, feeds, balanced 
rations, poultry diseases, egg production, meat production, culling of 
flock, pests, grading and marketing poultry products. 

Agriculture 131. General Horticulture. Three hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student 
with the best methods and practices in the care and management of 
the farm orchard and vegetable garden. 

Topics: Equal time is devoted to a study of fruit and vegetable 
production. The farm orchard is taken as a basis and laboratory for 
the study of selection of type of soil, site, grafting and budding, 
planting, fertilizing, cultivation and general management of the 
orchard with special work in pruning and spraying. Small fruits also 
receive some attention. Assigned library references and practical 
work with hotbeds and cold frames in the production of early 
vegetables result in a working knowledge of gardening. 



74 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Agriculture 211. (Formerly Agriculture 111.) Farm Crops. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give the student a practical 
knowledge of the best methods in the selection, production and dis- 
position of the cereal and forage crops of the region. 

Topics: Cereal and forage crops, crop improvement, storage and 
marketing, crop rotation, judging grain, testing seeds. 

Agriculture 223. Market Milk. Three hours. 

Purpose: To study the problems that confront producers and 
distributors of market milk and milk products. 

Topics: Market milk, milk as a food, milk in its relation to 
public health, bacteriology of milk, dairy farm inspection, scoring 
milk and cream, cost of milk production, milk plants, pasteurization, 
refrigeration, etc. 

Agriculture 224. Dairy Cattle Management. Three hours. 

Purpose: To bring the student into close contact with the 
dairying business. 

Topics: Dairy breeds, judging, breeding, feeding, calf raising, 
pedigrees, advanced registry, dairymen's association, dairy barn 
construction, equipment, etc. 

Agriculture 228. Livestock Management. Three hours. 

Purpose: To teach the best practices and principles involved 
in the economical production of beef cattle, sheep and swine on 
the farm. 

Topics: Feed and care for farm animals. Fitting for market or 
the show ring. Prevention and treatment of common ailments. 

Agriculture 250. Farm Shop. Two hours. 

Purpose: This is a laboratory course in which repair and 
maintenance are given major attention. Some construction work 
of an elementary nature is done. Care and operation of the more 
common farm machines will be given consideration. 

Agriculture 251. Farm Engineering. Two hours. 

Purpose: To give the student practice in establishing terrace, 
laying out drainage ditches, farm surveying, planning the farm- 
stead, construction and repair of farm buildings. 

Agriculture 315. (Formerly Agriculture 115 and 215.) Soils. 
Three hours. 

Prereqmsite: Chemistry 111. 

Purpose: To give the student a thorough knowledge of soil 
physics and soil management, and to summarize the best principles 
and methods of soil improvement and fertility. 

Topics: A study of the properties and management of soils; 
harrowing and cultivation; organic matter, bacterial action and 
optimum conditions for growth of plants; the origin, the weathering 



CATALOG 1940-41 75 

and types of soils; plant foods; crop requirements and fertilizers; 
rotation of crops as means of soil preservation. 

Agriculture 321. (Formerly Agriculture 121 and 221.) Feed 
and Feeding. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111. 

Purpose: To give the student a thorough knowledge of the cost, 
composition and comparative feeding values of feeds; to point out 
the uses of the food nutrients and the parts they play in growth, 
maintenance and production of the product; to study the feed require- 
ments of the various farm animals and how to balance rations to 
suit their needs. 

Topics: Digestive systems of farm animals; digestion; composi- 
tion and digestibility of various feeds; origin and history of scientific 
feeding; methods and principles of calculating and balancing rations; 
home grown feeds, such as corn, oats, wheat, rye, barley, and their 
by-products, also roughages, such as silage, straw, corn fodder, grass 
hays and the important legumes with the object to balance rations 
at least cost. 

Agriculture 345. Farm Management and Organization. Three 
hours. 

Purpose: To give the student practice in applying the funda- 
mental principles and knowledge of good business methods in farm 
enterprises; to enable the student to recognize symptoms, diagnose 
the ailments of unsuccessful farms and prescribe remedies. 

Topics: Personal characteristics desirable in farmers, profits, 
cost of living, types of farming, maintaining soil fertility, livestock 
problems, farm labor, farm rents, farm equipment, farm layout. 

Agriculture 346. Farm Accounting. Two hours. 
Purpose: A laboratory course in which the fundamentals of 
accounting as applied to the farm are studied. 

Agriculture 405. Dairy Bacteriology. Four hours. 

Purpose: To study the bacteriological principles involved in the 
processing of milk and other dairy products. The control of 
bacteria that are of pathogenic importance. 

Agriculture 441. (Formerly Agriculture 241 and 341.) Agricul- 
tural Economics. Three hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give the student an 
idea of the economics which may be introduced into the agricultural 
industry and of the different elements composing the resources of the 
farmer. 

Topics: Farm operation, farm equipment, the size of the farms, 
farm labor and wages, farm credit, insurance needs of the farmer, 
tenant farming, rent and profit, marketing, farm products, crop 
estimates and forecasts, price fixing and the cost of farm products, 
the social side of farm life, the future of the farmer, etc. 



76 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Practicnms: Practicums will be available to a limited number 
of students who have the necessary prerequisites. In order to enroll 
for a practicum the student must first have the sanction of the 
instructor in charge of the work. As a general rule, a practictim 
carries a credit of one hour. Students who already have a standard 
load will not be allowed to carry practicums for credit without 
approval of the Registrar. 

COMMERCE 

Mr. Moore Miss Ford Miss Gill Mr. Richards 

Commerce 119. Elementary Acco\uiting. Four hours. 

Purpose: To prepare the student to teach the subject or to do 
practical accounting and bookkeeping work; to furnish a background 
for work in business administration. 

Topics: Cash items; how to safeguard cash; the cash book; 
banking transactions; non-profit organizations; business forms and 
papers; trading businesses; theory of debt and credit; double entry 
record keeping; books of original entry; the ledger; the trial balance; 
financial statements; books for a sole proprietorship, partnership, 
and corporation; budgets; Kentucky income tax regulations; social 
secvurity tax; bad debts; investment records. 

Commerce 120. (Formerly Commerce 220.) Principles of 
Accounting. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 119. 

Purpose: To further prepare the student to teach the subject or 
to do practical accounting and bookkeeping work, and to furnish a 
broader background for work in business administration. 

Topics: A more thorough consideration of controlling accounts 
and practice in handling them in a laboratory set; the characteristics 
of a partnership; relation of partnership to accoimting; formation of a 
partnership; division of profits; admission of a new partner; retire- 
ment of a partner; dissolution of a partnership. A laboratory set of 
books is kept for the partnership form of business organization. 
Vouchers are provided to make the laboratory work as practicable 
as possible. 

Commerce 124. Economic History of Europe. Three hours. 

See Economics 124. 

Commerce 126. (Formerly Commerce 121.) Business Math- 
ematics I. Two hours. 

Purpose: To prepare the student for Commerce 119, and to pro- 
vide the student with sufficient information to enable him to teach 
business arithmetic in the high school. 

Topics: Rapid calculation in the fimdamental processes; draw- 
ings and graphs; percentage; buying and selling merchandise; com- 



CATALOG 1940-41 77 

mercial discounts; recording purchases and sales; paying for goods; 
collecting bills; accounts; taking inventory interest; discounting 
notes and other commercial papers; wages and payrolls; postage, 
freight, and express rates; property insurance; taxation. 

Commerce 127. Business Mathematics II, Two hours. 

Purpose: To give the student sufficient backgrovind in business 
mathematics to enable him to pursue advanced accounting, invest- 
ments, insurance, etc. 

Topics: A rapid review of the topics covered in Commerce 126, 
bank discount, true discount and present value, exact interest, log- 
arithms, equation of accounts, domestic and foreign exchange, series, 
annuities, bond valuation, business graphs, ciimulative annuities, 
cvimulative sinking ftmds, cumulative amortization plans, building 
and loan association calculations, industrial loans, etc. 

Commerce 131. Penmanship. No credit. All students majoring 
in commerce unless excused by the Head of the Department are 
required to take this course. 

Purpose: To teach the principles of good handwriting, to 
afford practice in executing these principles, and to develop an 
appreciation of good handwriting. 

Commerce 151. Beginning Typewriting. Two hours. (Credit 
on this course will be recorded when Commerce 152 has been 
completed.) Fee, $1.00. 

Purpose: To develop proper technique in typewriting, and to 
learn to arrange simple material in attractive form. 

Topics: Mechanics of the typewriter, the keyboard, word drills, 
sentence drills, paragraph drills, styles of letters, attractive arrange- 
ment of materials. 

Commerce 152. Intermediate Typewriting. Two hours. 
Fee, $1.00. 

Pvupose: To attain speed with accuracy in working out 
practical problems in typewriting. 

Topics: Drill on material which will develop speed and 
accuracy; practice in the writing of business letters, simple manu- 
scripts, and simple tabulations. 

Commerce 215. (Formerly Commerce 115.) Beginning Short- 
hand. Three hours. 

Purpose: To master the principles of Gregg shorthand and to 
develop a fluent and legible style of writing. 

Topics: The principles of Gregg shorthand as outlined in the 
Gregg Manual; shorthand penmanship drills; supplementary 
reading; daOy dictation including words of high frequency, 
sentences, and letters; vocabulary tests; transcription. 



78 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Commerce 216. (Formerly Commerce 116.) Advanced Short- 
hand. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 215. 

Purpose: To develop speed in taking dictation and in tran- 
scribing. 

Topics: A review of the Gregg shorthand principles; supple- 
mentary reading; dictation and transcription of literary articles and 
various types of letters; vocabulary and transcription tests. 

Commerce 221. (Formerly Commerce 322.) Principles of 
Accounting. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 119 and 120. 

Purpose: To further prepare the student to teach the subject or 
to do practical accounting and bookkeeping work, and to furnish the 
student a more comprehensive background for work in business 
administration. 

Topics: Natxire and characteristics of the corporation; accovmts 
and records peculiar to a corporation; corporate accounting subse- 
quent to organization; the voucher system; accounting for manufac- 
turing; accounting for departments and branches; non-profit organiza- 
tions; accounting for creditor control; accoiHiting and management. 
A laboratory set of books is kept for the corporate form of business 
organization. 

Commerce 230. (Formerly Commerce 125.) Principles of 
Economics. Three hours. See Economics 230. 

Coimnerce 231. (Formerly Commerce 222.) Principles of 
Applied Economics. Three hours. See Economics 231. 

Commerce 253. Advanced Typewriting. Two hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Purpose: To attain a degree of proficiency sufficient to enable 
one to do professional typewriting or to teach typewriting; to 
familiarize students with the best techniques of teaching typewriting. 

Topics: Drill on material which will develop speed and 
accuracy; manuscripts, tabulations, legal and other business forms; 
teaching technique. 

Commerce 301. (Formerly Commerce 201.) Business English. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and English 102. 

Purpose: To develop skill in the use of clear, concise, and 
forceful English in the writing of business letters. 

Topics: The essential qualities of business writing; the sales 
letter; appeals to special classes; follow-up letters; inquiries, orders, 
and responses; credit letters; collection letters; adjustment letters; 
letters of application; business reports; style studies. 

Commerce 302. Dictation and Transcription. Two hours. 
Prerequisites: Commerce 151, 152, 215, 216 or their equivalents. 



CATALOG 1940-41 79 

Purpose: To develop speed and accuracy in taking dictation 
and in transcribing. 

Topics: A review of Gregg shorthand principles and the 
technique of speed; a review and application of the rules of 
punctuation; dictation selected with the view to building vocabulary 
and giving the student an introductory knowledge of desirable 
office practices and personality traits essential to success in office 
work; transcription. 

Commerce 303. (Formerly Commerce 203.) Secretarial 
Practice. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 151, 152, 253, 215, 216. 

Purpose: To develop speed in transcribing, and to familiarize 
the student with office procedure. 

Topics: Advanced dictation and transcription including a study 
of vocabularies of leading lines of business; effective office arrange- 
ment and display of tj^jewriting; duties of a secretary; dress, deport- 
ment, and ethics; use and care of office machines; selection of office 
supplies; filing; use of office reference books; reporting speeches 
and meetings; actual stenographic experience. 

Commerce 309. (Formerly Commerce 209.) Business Organiza- 
tion. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 230. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the different types of 
business organization. 

Topics: Classes of business organization, their evolution, and the 
tests of efficiency; individual entrepreneur organization; partnership; 
corporation; joint-stock company; business trusts; simple agreements 
and price combinations; pools; combination trusts; community-of- 
interest organization; holding company; amalgamations; mergers; 
promotion; underwriting; stock exchanges; reorganizations and 
receiverships; legislation. 

Commerce 310. (Formerly Commerce 210 and 321.) American 
Economic History. Two hours. See Economics 310. 

Commerce 324. (Formerly Commerce 224.) Money and Bank- 
ing. Three hours. See Economics 324. 

Commerce 325. Principles of Accounting — Advanced. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 119, 120, 221. 

Purpose: To further prepare students who expect to teach 
accounting and bookkeeping, and to give a broader knowledge of the 
subject to those interested in business administration. The course is 
also planned for those desiring to prepare themselves for public or 
private accounting work. 



80 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: A detailed study of financial statements; the use of 
working papers involving departmental accounting and distribution 
of expenses; operating statements; various problems that arise in 
partnership accounting; specific problems that arise in corporation 
accounting. The principles discussed in class will be illustrated with 
problems. No set will be worked. 

Commerce 326. Principles of Accounting — ^Advanced. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 119, 120, 221. 

Purpose: This course is a continuation of Commerce 325. 

Topics: Profits; surplus; dividends; statement of new assets 
and their application; statement of affairs; statement of deficiency; 
realization and liquidation statement; depreciation; reserves; valua- 
tion accounts; earned surplus appropriations; funds and related 
reserves and earned surplus appropriations; good will; secret 
reserves. The principles discussed in class will be illustrated with 
problems. No set will be worked. 

Commerce 327. Cost Accounting. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 119, 120, 221. 

Purpose: This course is of value to those who desire to teach 
the subject or who desire accounting work beyond the elementary 
field. The person interested in business administration or who plans 
to do public or private accounting work will find the course practical 
for his needs. 

Topics: Classifications of costs; process and specific order; use 
of cost records; perpetual inventories; materials; labor costs; manu- 
facturing expense; distribution of service department costs; distribu- 
tion of manufactiiring expense to production; the cost to make and 
sell; estimating cost systems; establishment of standard costs; the 
uses of standard costs; some legal phases of cost accounting. A set 
of books dealing with cost accounting will be kept. 

Commerce 328. Income Tax Accounting. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 119, 120, 221. 

Purpose: To give the student an understanding of some of the 
underlying principles of Federal and State income tax laws and the 
methods of filing income tax returns. 

Topics: Income tax legislation — Federal and State; returns for 
individuals; exempt income of individuals; deductions allowed indi- 
viduals; computation of individual taxes; retiirns for estates and 
trusts; returns for partnerships; returns for corporations; account- 
ing procedure; administrative procedure; the capital stock tax; the 
excess profits tax; the estate tax; the gift tax; excise taxes. Students 
will have experience filling out income tax return forms. 

Commerce 341. (Formerly Commerce 241.) Salesmanship. 
Three hours. 



CATALOG 1940-41 81 

Purpose: To give information essential to those students who 
desire to teach the subject and to those who expect to do actual 
selling. 

Topics: The art of selling, the motive behind all buying, the 
customer's mental journey, attitudes of buyer and salesman, prepara- 
tion of the selling talk, the pre-approach, the intei^view, arousing 
interest, creating desire, answering objections, meeting excuses, 
diplomacy of the close, types of customers. 

Commerce 342. (Formerly Commerce 242.) Advertising. Three 
hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with some of the principles 
of advertising and to present certain very essential phases of pro- 
cedure to be followed in advertising work. 

Topics: The specific purpose of advertising, developing the 
copy, slogans, trade-marks, layouts, engraving, scheduling of 
advertisements in newspapers and magazines, direct mail advertising, 
outdoor advertising, dealer display advertising, packages, radio 
advertising, determining the value and results of advertising. 

Commerce 370. Contemporary Social and Economic Problems. 
One hour. Required of all juniors majoring in Commerce. 

Commerce 371. Contemporary Social and Economic Problems. 
One hour. A continuation of Commerce 370. Required of all 
juniors majoring in Conunerce. 

Commerce 405. (Formerly Commerce 305.) Business Law. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student 
with the principles of law which affect his everyday business 
relationships, and to enable him to teach the subject in high school 
or college. 

Topics: Law in general, kinds of law, persons, torts, contracts, 
agency, personal property, real property. 

Commerce 406. (Formerly Commerce 306.) Business Law. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student 
with further principles of law which affect his everyday business 
relationships, and to enable him to teach the subject in high school 
and college. 

Topics: Market transactions; bailments; sales and contracts to 
sell; practices prejudicial to a competitor; practices prejudicial to the 
public; legislative regulation of market practice; bills, notes, and 
checks; stocks and bonds; liens and mortgages; bills of lading and 
Vv'arehouse receipts; contracts of guaranty and suretyship; powers of 
creditors; privileges of debtors. 



82 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Commerce 425. (Formerly Commerce 325.) Accounting Prob- 
lems. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 119, 120, 221. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with problems met in various 
fields of accounting and to introduce the student to some C. P. A. 
problems. 

Topics: Special types of statements; revision and correction of 
financial statements; corporate bonds and sinking funds; amalga- 
mations and mergers of corporations; holding companies and consoli- 
dated balance sheets; adjustments and analysis of surplus, consign- 
ment and joint ventures; selling agencies; fire loss and insurance 
adjustments; installment sales. No set will be kept. The work will 
be in the nature of problems. 

Commerce 430. (Formerly Commerce 330.) Public Finance. 
Two hours. See Economics 430. 

Commerce 431. Taxation. Two hours. See Economics 431. 

Commerce 440. (Formerly Commerce 340.) Investments. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 230. 

Purpose: To give the student information concerning the funda- 
mental principles of sound investments, to help the average person 
to work out a plan for his investments, and to teach the importance 
of thrift and saving. 

Topics: The importance of capital in present day economic 
society, classification of securities, analyses of securities, possibilities 
of investment in different classes of securities, financial institutions, 
the mechanics of investments, the effect of taxation on investment 
policies, investment and the business cycle, business forecasting, and 
the determination of an investment policy. 

Commerce 443. (Formerly Commerce 343.) Marketing. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 230. 

Purpose: To provide the student with information concerning 
the economics of distribution and distributive agencies and their 
functions. 

Topics: Consumers' buying motives, marketing functions and 
institutions, selling direct to consumer, earlier and simpler types of 
retail institutions, department stores, mail-order houses, chain stores, 
agricultural wholesale markets, middlemen of the city agricultural 
markets, classes and types of wholesalers, raw materials, cooperative 
marketing, speculation, prices and some price policies, brands and 
brand policies, ethical aspects of marketing. 

Commerce 461a. The Teaching of Stenography. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Commerce 151, 152, 215, 216. 



CATALOG 1940-41 83 

Purpose: To give the student a knowledge of classroom pro- 
cedures and methods in teaching Gregg shorthand, typewriting, and 
office practice. 

Topics: Objectives in teaching shorthand, typewriting, and 
office practice; methods of teaching shorthand, typewriting, and 
office practice, including a survey of the direct method of teaching 
shorthand and typewriting and the functional method of teaching 
shorthand; textbooks and supplementary materials available; 
motivation and methods of study; types of examinations and 
their importance; classroom equipment; blackboard shorthand 
penmanship. 

Commerce 461b. Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping, Accounting 
and Junior Business Training. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Open to students who are taking a major or minor 
in Commerce and who have completed Commerce 119, 120, 221, or the 
equivalent. 

Purpose: To give the student various phases of classroom 
procedure and methods in teaching bookkeeping, accounting, and 
junior business training. 

Topics: Objectives in giving bookkeeping, accounting, and junior 
business training courses; textbooks suitable for use; supplementary 
material; methods of approach; how to teach certain phases of our 
financial life, commiunication, travel and transportation, buying and 
selling; the work at the end of a fiscal period for bookkeepers and 
accountants, including accrued and deferred items, adjusting entries, 
working sheet, financial statements, closing entries; suitable 
examinations. 

Commerce 470. (Formerly Commerce 570.) Seminar. One 
hour. Required of all seniors majoring in Commerce. 

Commerce 471. (Formerly Commerce 571.) Seminar. One 
hour. Required of all seniors majoring in Commerce. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Miss Dix Miss Burrier Miss Slater 

Home Economics 101. (Formerly Home Economics 110.) 
Texiles. Two hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with standard fabrics on the 
market suitable for clothing and house furnishings; to give the student 
a knowledge of the proper treatments in the laundering of the various 
classes of textile fibers; to develop in the student an appreciation of 
good textile fabrics; and to develop an vmderstanding of the student's 
responsibility as a consumer and a teacher. 

Topics: Microscopic study of fibers; simple household tests for 
the determination of fiber content; reaction of acids and alkalies on 



84 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

the various fibers; study of the manufacture of fibers and fabrics; 
identifying materials by commercial names; economic and social 
aspects of textile purchase; removal of stains; laundering. 

Home Economics 102. (Formerly Home Economics 103.) Source, 
Selection and Cost of Foods. Two hours. 

Purpose: To familiarize the student with marketing problems, 
and to teach the kinds and grades of foods. 

Topics: The processes that food vmdergo from the producer to 
the consumer; how to purchase; where to purchase; food budgets; 
variety, source, selection, and comparative cost of foods used in the 
home. 

Home Economics 155. Costume Design. Two hours. 

Purpose: The course is planned to give a general knowledge of 
the principles of design as they relate to the costume. This course 
is for the special art student and the home economics major. 

Topics: Color, form, line, texture, history of costume, projects 
for the secondary school, costtuning plays; technical problems of the 
representation of costumes in water color, pen and ink, crayon and 
tempers; appreciation of the work of costume designers. 

Home Economics 203. (Formerly Home Economics 111.) 
Garment Making. Three hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to acquaint the student with 
the fundamentals of garment construction. Emphasis is placed on 
both hand and machine sewing. It also aims to develop an apprecia- 
tion for artistic clothing in order that the individual may more wisely 
select ready-made garments. 

Topics: Study of the sewing machine and attachments; making 
of simple patterns; selection of materials suitable for simple wash 
dress, kimona or gown; study of materials, colors and designs 
suitable for various undergarments; care and repair of clothing. 

Home Economics 204. (Formerly Home Economics 101.) 
Nutrition and Food Preparation. Three hours. Laboratory fee, $1.50. 

Purpose: To familiarize the student with the general composi- 
tion and the place in the diet of foods; to teach the fundamental 
principles of preparation of foods. 

Topics: Principles involved in the preservation of foods, in the 
cookery of sugars, fats, starches, fruits, vegetables, batters, doughs, 
milk, eggs, meats, and beverages. 

Home Economics 205. (Formerly Home Economics 201.) Meal 
Planning, Preparation and Serving. Three hours. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. (During a semester each student enrolled for this class 
receives 25 meals from this fee.) 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 204 or its equivalent. 



CATALOG 1940-41 85 

Purpose: To enable the student to plan, prepare and serve well- 
balanced home meals at varying costs; to familiarize students with 
different types of table service; and to teach table etiquette. 

Topics: Principles of well-balanced meals; preparation and 
serving of well-planned meals with different types of services; study 
of the respective duties of host, hostess, guests, members of the 
family, and waitresses; computation of costs of various types of 
meals; table decorations and accessories for various occasions; care 
of dining-room equipment. 

Home Economics 206. (Formerly Home Economics 112 and 212.) 
Dressmaking. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 203 or equivalent. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to let the student acquire 
knowledge of appropriate and becoming clothing; to aid the student 
in interpreting commercial patterns; to create in her a confidence in 
cutting, fitting and altering commercial patterns to suit an individual; 
to teach the economic values of renovation and remodeling through a 
practical problem. 

Topics: Study of line, color and design in materials suitable to 
different types of figures; alterations of commercial patterns; special 
treatments in cutting, fitting, construction and finishing of dresses of 
cotton, linen, and silk. 

Home Economics 207. (Formerly Home Economics 113 and 213.) 
Care and Selection of the Wardrobe. Two hours. Not open to Home 
Economics majors. 

Purpose: This course is planned for students who wish to make 
an intelligent study of the wardrobe and know more about the 
selection of ready-made clothing, but do not wish to sew. 

Topics: The clothing budget; planning the wardrobe with 
special emphasis on kinds, numbers, suitability of garments and 
accessories; purchasing habits; a study of cost and method of caring 
for clothing. 

Home Economics 209. Home and Social Problems for Women. 
Two hours. 

Purpose: To create a desire for higher home and social stand- 
ards, thereby preparing women for efficient home-making. 

Topics: Nutrition, meal planning and home cookery; marketing; 
furniture selection and arrangement; clothing selection; family 
relations; home nursing; child care; social etiquette. 

Home Economics 222. Interior Decoration. Two hours. 

Purpose: A general survey course for the student who desires 
a knowledge of the principles of design in relation to interiors. 
Special emphasis is placed on the house and its design. 

Topics: Architecture; the house and its setting, types of houses; 
exterior and interior architecture; ornament. Study of period styles 



86 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

in furniture and furnishings. Treatment of interiors — color, form, 
line, texture in furniture and furnishings in relation to backgrounds. 
Home Economics 231. Home Nursing. Two hours. See Health 
231. 

Home Economics 301. (Formerly Home Economics 224.) 
Household Equipment. Two hours. 

Purpose: To familiarize girls with various types of modern 
household furnishings; to appreciate the importance of standardiza- 
tion; to enable them to purchase equipment of various types; to help 
them realize the value of labor-saving devices in the home. 

Topics: Laundry and kitchen furnishings, electric and non- 
electric; cleaning equipment; bedding; linens; china; glassware; 
silver; floor coverings; wall coverings; furniture. 

Home Economics 302. (Formerly Home Economics 102 and 202.) 
Advanced Cookery. Three hours. Laboratory fee $3.00. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 204. 

Purpose: To teach the scientific principles of cookery; to develop 
skill in cookery. 

Topics: Sugar cookery, fruits and vegetables, jelly, gelatin, 
meat, emulsions, milk, egg cookery, wheat flour and bread, batters 
and doughs, fats and oils. 

Home Economics 303. (Formerly Home Economics 225.) The 
Family. Two hours. 

Purpose: To study the family as an organization considering it 
from an economic and social standpoint. 

Topics: Psychological factors which go to make happy family 
life, place of children in the family, economic independence of women, 
homemaking as a profession, distribution of the family income. 

Home Economics 304. (Formerly Education 304.) Materials 
and Methods for Teaching Vocational Home Economics. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Eighteen hours of Home Economics, Education 
111, Education 314, and Education 364. 

Purpose: To give the student experience in the evaluation of 
teaching Home Economics subjects; experience in the organization 
of materials for the teaching of these subjects; experience in the 
co-ordination of school work with life's activities. 

Topics: Underlying principles of teaching, methods of presenta- 
tion of various subjects and topics, observations of teaching, labora- 
tory equipment, types of laboratories, books and periodicals. 

Home Economics 305. (Formerly Home Economics 316.) Tailor- 
ing. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 203 or its equivalent. 

Purpose: The ultimate aim of this course is to give prospective 



CATALOG 1940-41 87 

teachers experience in the handling of woolen materials and to 
acquaint them with the principles of tailoring. 

Topics: Cutting, fitting, constructing and finishing a tailored 
dress for an adult and a coat for either an adult or a child. 

Home Economics 306. Advanced Nutrition. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 220. 

Purpose: To give the student fundamental knowledge of the 
food nutrients and the function of each to the body. 

Topics: History of nutrition, food and its function, processes 
of nutrition. 

Home Economics 401. (Formerly Home Economics 301.) 
Dietetics. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 204, 205, Chemistry 220 and 
Biology 481 or registration in Biology 481 

Purpose: To give students an opportunity to know the essentials 
of an adequate diet and the nutritive value of common foods; to 
apply the fundamental principles of human nutrition to the feeding of 
individuals under various physiological, economic and social 
conditions. 

Topics: Composition of common foods, requirements of the body 
under different living conditions, dietary problems, prevention of 
diseases through the diet. 

Home Economics 402. (Formerly Home Economics 331.) 
Child Development. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Education 111, Education 314. 

Purpose: To teach the care necessary for the physical, mental, 
emotional, and social development of the child from infancy through 
adolescence. 

Topics: Prenatal care of the infant; physical care of the child; 
standards of mental development, and factors affecting these; stand- 
ards of emotional stability; training for social normality. 

Home Economics 403. (Formerly Home Economics 321.) Home 
Management. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 102, 204, 205 and junior or 
senior standing with a minimum of sixteen hours in Home 
Economics. 

Students must see the head of the Home Economics department 
for appointment to live in the Home Management House. 
Reservations should be made several weeks prior to the beginning 
of the semester. 

Home Economics 404. Institutional Cookery. Three hours. 

Purpose: To teach the application of scientific, economic and 
sociological principles of cookery for the feeding of large numbers 
of people. 



88 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: Preparation of food in large quantities for various size 
groups. 

Home Economics 405. Institutional Management. Three hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with various tjrpes of 
institutional management. 

Topics: Organization, management and equipment of institu- 
tions such as tea rooms, cafeterias, and hotel dining rooms; trips to 
visit large eating places, hotels, and school cafeterias. 

Home Economics 455. Advanced Costume Design. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 155. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the influence of historic 
costume on modern dress and to acquaint them with the work of 
modern dress designers. 

Topics: History of costume; draping and designing. 

Home Economics 466. Problems in the Teaching of Home 
Economics. One hour. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the head of the 
department. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give the student an 
opportunity to do laboratory work in connection with specific 
problems concerning the teaching of home economics 

Topics: Problems related to instruction and commvmity work 
in the field of home economics. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Mr. Deniston Mr. Lascoe Mr. Whalin 

Industrial Arts 100. General Shop. Three hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Purpose: To give the student an insight into several divisions 
of industrial arts and present information and develop skills that 
will be of value to the average citizen. 

Topics: The following units are included: Drawing, wood- 
working, metalworking, finishing, electrical, home mechanics, and 
craft. Emphasis will be placed on projects, exercises, and related 
information in each unit. 

Industrial Arts 141. Elementary Cabinet Construction. Three 
hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Purpose: To develop skill in performing the common operations 
in elementary cabinet construction and to acquire related information. 

Topics: The common hand tools, principles of construction, the 
process of finishing, and the characteristics of the ordinary cabinet 
woods will be studied. Projects will be built involving the funda- 
mental operations. This is the basic wood-working course. 

Industrial Arts 191. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. Three 
hours. 



CATALOG 1940-41 89 

Purpose: Given as the foundation course for machine and 
architectural drawing. 

Topics: This course is for students who have never studied any 
phase of mechanical drawing. A time limit is set upon each drawing 
suitable for the average student. The work covers the study of letter- 
ing, drafting room conventions, inking, tracing and blueprinting. 
Free hand sketches of problems are given to the student from which 
working drawings are made. 

Industrial Arts 222. Primary Handicraft. Two hours. Fee, 
$1.00. 

Purpose: A course dealing with the typical forms of indus- 
trial arts applicable to the conditions in the primary grades. 

Topics: A study of subject matter, methods, and the use of 
materials involving lectures; readings, reports, discussions, 
observations and laboratory work. 

Industrial Arts 233. Industrial Arts Design. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 191 or Art 260, 

Purpose: To give the student a working knowledge of applied 
industrial design; to enable the student to select and enjoy good 
commercial design. 

Topics: The fundamental principles of constructive, decorative 
and pictorial art are studied. The problems given involve the 
practical application of these principles to the various articles made 
in other shop courses. Actual classroom work is done in designing 
and rendering with pencil, pen, ink and color 

Industrial Arts 242. Intermediate Cabinet Making. Three 
hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisites: Industrial Arts 141 and Industrial Arts 191. 

Purpose: To give the student additional cabinet making practice 
using turned work. 

Topics: Selection of problems, practice work on wood lathe, 
making of turned elements, and assembling of projects. Attention 
will be given to the sharpening of tools, their care, and the finishing 
of projects. 

Industrial Arts 249. Wood Finishing and Decoration. Two 
hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 141. 

Piirpose: To familiarize the student with the different methods 
of finishing and decorating. 

Topics: The work offered in this course covers the making of 
a series of panels showing the methods and value of the different 
types of finishes. In addition students are given practical work in 
painting, interior finishing, and the refinishing of furniture. Lectures 
will be given upon the different materials used. 



90 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Industrial Arts 280. (Formerly Industrial Arts 281). General 
Metalworking. Three hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Purpose: To acquire information and develop skill in the 
fundamentals of the different phases of metalwork. 

Topics: This course will consist of operations and information 
in bench metal, machine shop practice, sheet metal and art metal. 
Projects will be required from each unit. 

Industrial Arts 292. (Formerly Industrial Arts 392.) Ele- 
mentary Machine Drawing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 191. 

Purpose: To teach technique, speed, and accuracy in the making 
of detailed drawings; assembly drawings in accordance with standard 
drafting room conventions. 

Topics: A study is made of the principal forms of bolts, screws, 
threads, nuts and conventions. The student secures his problem 
from perspective with dimensions, tabular data, and from sketches 
made from actual machine parts. Detail drawings in sections, assem- 
bly drawings from details, and detail from assembly drawing will 
constitute the main body of this course. 

Industrial Arts 293. Advanced Mechanical Drawing. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 191. 

Purpose: To give the student additional training in mechanical 
drawing. 

Topics: The problems of the elementary course will be con- 
tinued with special emphasis on technique. A shorter time limit 
will be placed on plates. Drawings will be correlated with the 
shopwork whenever possible. 

Industrial Arts 299. Lettering. One hour. 

Purpose: Given to acquaint students with simple methods of 
lettering suitable for school use. 

Topics: The work begins with thin line, single stroke letters, 
followed by various alphabets of wide line filled in, and ornamental 
types. Initial letters and monograms are designed. The lettering of 
school posters and signs receives special attention. 

Industrial Arts 303. Shop Equipment. Two hours. 

Purpose: To give students information and experience in shop 
planning and advice on the selection of equipment. 

Topics: A study will be made of various types of industrial 
arts shops and their equipment. A number of shop plans with com- 
plete lists of equipment will be made. 

Industrial Arts 323. Weaving and Upholstering. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 242. 

Purpose: To teach simple upholstering, caning and weaving. 



CATALOG 1940-41 91 

Topics: Methods of upholstering a plain surface; upholstering 
frame structures; upholstering with springs; renovation; caning; split 
and fiber weaving; materials, tools, and tool operations. 

Industrial Arts 343. Advanced Cabinet Making. Three hours. 

Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisites: Industrial Arts 141 and Industrial Arts 242. 

Purpose: To give instruction and experience in advanced 
cabinet and furniture construction and to develop skill in the opera- 
tion of woodworking machinery. 

Topics: Advanced projects will be made that involve skill in the 
use of machines and tools. Such problems as reeding, fluting, 
carving, inlaying, veneering, and dovetailing will be done. 
A certain amount of related information is required. 

Industrial Arts 344. Wood Turning. Three hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 242. 

Purpose: To give the student a thorough knowledge of the com- 
mon wood turning problems and to develop a high degree of skill in 
performing the different operations. 

Topics: Instruction will be provided in the use of the lathe and 
the sharpening of tools. Operations will be performed involving 
spindle; face plate; chuck turning; finishing and polishing. A series 
of exercises and projects will be required. 

Industrial Arts 361. Organization and Administration of 
Industrial Arts. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

Purpose: To provide the teachers and administrators with a 
background and information concerning the organization, administra- 
tion, and supervision of industrial arts. 

Topics: Analysis of the administrative officer, organization, 
instructional material, tests and measurements, professional reading, 
and the supervision of instruction. 

Industrial Arts 382. (Formerly Industrial Arts 487.) Machine 
Shop Practice I. Three hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 100 and Industrial Arts 280. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with materials, machines, 
methods and operations which are employed in machine shop 
practice. 

Topics: The work includes the study and operation of the most 
common machine lathes used in school shops, machine tools, and 
machining methods on simple tool projects. 

Industrial Arts 383. Art Metal Work. Three hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Purpose: To develop skill in the working of the soft metals 
and mild steel into projects that are artistic in design and useful. 
A knowledge of the characteristics and production of these metals 
will be gained. 



92 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: The student will perform operations in laying out, 
raising, planishing, chasing, etching, forming, spinning, turning, and 
finishing metals. Bending, twisting, drilling, riveting, and welding 
will be done in ornamental iron. A number of projects wUl be 
made that involve these operations. 

Industrial Arts 385, Sheet Metal Work. Three hours. Fee, 
$1.00. 

Purpose: To develop skill in performing the common operations 
in sheet metal and acquire related information. 

Topics: This course will include the care and use of the com- 
mon sheet metal tools and machines, the making of layouts, templates, 
and a series of projects involving such operations as soldering, seam- 
ing, punching, riveting, forming, and spot welding. 

Industrial Arts 394. Elementary Architectural Drawing. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 191. 

Purpose: To give fundamental practice in architectural drawing. 

Topics: Lettering; elements of architecture; mouldings; shades 
and shadows; wash work; rendering; drawing from model or cast; 
sketching; lectures. 

Industrial Arts 444. Machine Woodworking. Two hours. Fee, 
$1.00. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 343. 

Purpose: To acquaint students with special operations, repair, 
and servicing of power woodworking machinery. 

Topics: In this course emphasis is placed on practical work. 
The shop is equipped with modern woodworking machinery. 
Instruction is given through demonstrations, assignment, information, 
and operation sheets. Students are taught the care and maintenance 
of shop equipment. 

Industrial Arts 466. (Formerly Industrial Arts 366.) Teaching 
of Industrial Arts. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Purpose: Given as an informational course to students wishing 
to teach industrial arts. 

Topics: The problem of teaching from the standpoint of 
industrial arts; organization of subject matter; methods of presenta- 
tions; organization and class management; types of lessons; lesson 
plans; demonstrations, testing and system of grading. 

Industrial Arts 487. Machine Shop Practice II. Three hours. 

Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisites: Industrial Arts 100, Industrial Arts 280, and 
Industrial Arts 382. 

Purpose: Designed as an advance course in machine shop 
practice. 



CATALOG 1940-41 93 

Topics: The advance work in machine shop practice will 
consist largely of layout work, jig set ups, shop mathematics, and 
blue print reading. Practical work will consist of moulding, casting 
simple forms, machining different types of tapers, fits, thread cutting, 
shaping, milling, and heat treating of different metals. 

Industrial Arts 496. Advanced Architectural Drawing. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 394. 

Purpose: Given as a final test of student ability in architectural 
work. 

Topics: Student, with the instructor's approval, will select a 
project and make a suitable esquisse and rendu of same. 

LBSRART SCIENCE 

Miss Floyd Miss Bennett Mrs. Whitehead 

Library Science 166. Library Orientation. One hour. 

Purpose: To give the student a working knowledge of the 
library in order to be able to use it most intelligently arid effectively. 

Topics: The course includes discussions of the card catalog, 
library plans, principles of classification, mechanical make-up of the 
books, reference books, indexes, bibliographies, and printed aids in 
book selections. 



DIVISION OF FINE ARTS 



Mr. Van Peursem 
Miss Agna 
Miss Campbell 
Mr. Fitz 



Miss Fowler 

Miss Gibson 

Mr. Giles 



Mr. Kinzer 

Mrs. Seevers 

Mr. Stone 

Miss Telford 



Miss Fowler 



ART 

Mr. Fitz 
Miss Gibson 



Mr. Giles 



Art 117. (Formerly Art 115 and 116.) Elementary Drawing and 
Design. Four hours. 

Purpose: Development of technical skill and creative ability 
through fundamental training in the use of line, form, tone and color. 
A beginning course of general appeal, also an essential foundation 
course for the special art student and the home economics major. 

Topics: Representation of simple objects, plants, birds, animals, 
the human head and figure. Elementary study of perspective, light, 
and shade composition, color, design, pencil and pen drawing. 
Mediums employed include pencil, charcoal, crayon, water-color, 
clay, pen and ink. 

Art 118. Art Media. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117. 

Purpose: This course constitutes a course in laboratory practice 
designed to meet individual needs and abilities in a variety of art 
media. 

Topics: Problems in design, drawing, and painting; charcoal, 
pen and ink, pastel, water color, tempera, colored chalk, pencil, 
and oil. 

Art 155. (Formerly Art 355.) Costume Design. Two hours. 

Purpose: The course is planned to give a general knowledge of 
the principles of design as they relate to the costume. This course is 
for the special art student and the home economics major. 

Topics: Color, form, line, texture, history of costume, projects 
for the secondary school, costuming plays; technical problems of the 
representation of costumes in water color, pen and ink, crayon and 
tempers; appreciation of the work of costume designers. 

Art 200. (Formerly Art 190.) Appreciation of Art. Two hours. 

Purpose: Establishment of a basis for judgment and good taste 
through a survey of the development of architecture, sculpture, paint- 
ing, design, and the applied arts, with emphasis placed upon the 
analysis of selected examples. 



96 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: Architecture, sculpture, painting, the graphic arts, print- 
ing and advertising art, industrial arts, color, design, dress, the 
theatre, community art, art in the home. 

Art 217. (Formerly Art 216 and 225.) Lettering and Poster 
Design. Two hours. 

Purpose: Development of appreciation of good typography and 
good design in lettering and posters. Development of the ability to 
apply art principles in the production of hand lettering and effective 
posters. 

Topics: The fundamental styles of lettering; their origin and 
development, their possibilities for use and adaptation. Problems in 
spacing and page arrangement, including the making of monograms, 
notices, show cards. Application of advertising principles to the 
making of simple posters. 

Art 222. Interior Decoration. Two hours. 

Purpose: A general survey course for the student who desires 
a knowledge of the principles of design in relation to interiors. 
Special emphasis is placed on the house and its design. 

Topics: Architecture; the house and its setting, types of houses; 
exterior and interior architecture; ornament. Study of period styles 
in furniture and furnishings. Treatment of interiors — color, form, 
line, texture in furniture and furnishings in relation to backgrounds. 

Art 260. (Formerly Art 161.) Public School Art. Two hours. 

Purpose: A course for the grade teacher who wishes to become 
more efficient in the teaching of lettering, design, color, representa- 
tion, construction and appreciation in the elementary school. Units 
of work are based on the minimum content essentials, integrating art 
with the subject matter of the curriculum. 

Topics: Problems are presented to develop skill in representation 
— drawing of the human figure, animals, birds, plants and constructed 
objects; color; design; lettering; bookmaking; appreciation. 

Art 315. Drawing, Painting, and Composition. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117 or equivalent. 

Purpose: Development of technical skill and creative ability. 

Topics: Drawing and painting in charcoal, crayon, chalk, oil 
and water color. Study of still life, outdoor sketching, perspective, 
composition. 

Art 316. Drawing and Modeling. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 117 or equivalent. 
Purpose: Development of graphic ability. 

Topics: Drawing and modeling from the cast of head and 
figure; figure sketching and composition. 

Art 321. Drawing and Illustration. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 117, 210, 217. 



CATALOG 1940-41 97 

Purpose: To develop further creativeness and skill in drawing 
and in illustration of ideas. 

Topics: Design, illustration in black and white and in color. 
Original illustrations for stories. 

Art 361. (Formerly Art 261.) Art Education in the Elementary 
and Secondary School. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 260 or 117 or 217 or equivalent. 

Purpose: A course for teachers who wish a general knowledge 
of present day theories and practices of art education in the ele- 
mentary and secondary school. 

Topics: The course of study, minimum content essentials, meth- 
ods, standard of attainment, tests and measurements and equipment. 

Art 372. Applied Design. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 140 or 222. 

Purpose: To develop through the use of materials and pro- 
cesses and through a study of fine examples of crafts an apprecia- 
tion of good craftsmanship. 

Topics: Application of design made to stenciling, linoleum 
block printing, leather tooling, tie-dying, soap carving, bookmak- 
Lng, card weaving, enameling. 

Art 390. (Formerly Art 290.) The History of Art. Three hours. 

Purpose: To provide the student with a basic understanding of 
the development of the plastic arts. 

Topics: An introduction to the study of the history of architec- 
ture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts of all nations; prints and 
slides are used for illustrative purposes. 

Art 470. Advanced Drawing, Painting, and Illustration. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 315 or equivalent. 

Purpose: This course is designed for advanced students of 
design and painting. 

Topics: Pictorial composition; illustration; sketches and studies 
from still life, landscape. Mediums: Charcoal, pastel, water color, 
and oil. 

Art 476. Advanced Painting. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Art 117, 315, 316, and preferably 215 or 
equivalent. 

Purpose: Development of technical skill and appreciation for 
those desiring special training in painting mediums. 

Topics: Painting in water color and oil from still life and the 
figure. The course will be adapted to the requirements of the par- 
ticular group. 



E. S. T. C. 



98 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

MUSIC 

Miss Campbell 
Mr. Van Peursem Mr. Kinzer Mr. Stone 

Miss Agna Mrs. Seevers Miss Telford 

MUSIC FEES 

Individual instruction (Piano, organ, voice, violin, violoncello, band 
and orchestra instruments): 

Two half-hour lessons per week, one semester $27.00 

One half-hour lesson per week, one semester 18.00 

Music 10a, 10b, 20a, and 20b, one semester 5.00 

Music 230b, one semester 5.00 

Music 240a and 240b, one semester 2.50 

Practice room with piano, one hour daily, one 

semester 5.00 

Use of college-owned violin, one semester 2.50 

PIANO 

Music 10a and 10b. (Formerly Music 18a and 18b.) Piano 
Class Instruction. No credit. 

See music fees. 

Purpose: To give group instruction, to provide a foundation 
for correct piano playing and to prepare the student for more 
advanced private study 

Topics: Hand position, notation, simple melodies, and folk 
songs. 

Music 11a and lib. Piano. Individual Instruction. No credit. 

See music fees. 

This course is an introduction to piano playing and is designed 
to fit the needs of the non-musician who wishes to learn to play the 
piano or who desires to prepare himself for Music 211a. The work 
may be completed in one year, or it may require more time, accord- 
ing to the ability and application of the student. 

Topics: Major scales and tonic chords. 

Kohler, Op. 190; Streabbog, Op. 63; Bilbro, Progressive Early 
Grade Studies; Loeschorn, Op. 65, Bk. I. 

Music 211a and 211b. Piano. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Schmitt Preparatory Exercises; all major and minor 
scales in parallel motion; tonic chords and inversions. 

Burgmuller, Op. 100; Loeschorn, Op. 65, Bk. II; Bach-Carroll, 
Book for Beginners; Clementi, Easy Sonatas, Op. 36. 

Music 212a and 212b. Piano. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 



CATALOG 1940-41 99 

See music fees. 

Topics: Schmitt Preparatory Exercises; major and minor scales 
in parallel and contra motion; tonic chords, and broken chords 
with inversions. 

Heller, Op. 47; Duvernoy, Op. 120; Bach, Little Preludes; 
Clementi and Kuhlau Sonatinas. 

Music 213a and 213b. Piano. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Wolff, The Little Pischna; major and minor scales in 
parallel and contra motion; tonic broken chords and inversions; 
tonic and diminished seventh arpeggi. 

Czerny, Op. 299; Heller, Op. 45; Bach, Two Part Inventions; 
Mozart, easiest Sonatas. 

Music 214a and 214b. Piano. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Philipp Exercises Pratiques; or Pischna; major and 
minor scales in thirds, sixths, and tenths; tonics, dominant, and 
diminished seventh arpeggi, and inversions. 

Cramer (Bulow), Sixty Selected Studies; Bach, three part 
inventions; and Sonatas by Mozart and Haydn. 

Music 215a and 215b. Piano. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Philipp; Pischna, Exercises Journaliers; scales and 
arpeggi in faster tempi. 

Bach, B'rench Studies; Czerny, Op. 740; or Clementi, Gradu ad 
Parnassum; Beethoven, Sonatas. 

VOICE 

Music 20a and 20b. (Formerly Music 28a and 28b.) Voice. 
Class Instruction. No credit. 

See music fees. 

Purpose: To give group instruction, to provide a foundation 
for correct singing and to prepare the student for more advanced 
private study. 

Music 21a and 21b. Voice. Individual Instruction. No credit. 

See music fees. 

This course is an introduction to voice and is designed to fit the 
needs of the non-musician who wishes to learn to sing or who 
desires to prepare himself for Music 221a. The work may be com- 
pleted in one year, or it may require more time, according to the 
ability and application of the student. 



100 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Music 120. Chorus. One hour. 

Purpose: (a) To encourage and foster a knowledge of and a 
desire to participate in choral singing, (b) to teach part singing, 
(c) to familiarize students with standard community and folk songs, 
with the more familiar choral works of the masters and with some of 
the simpler modern works for mixed chorus, (d) to acquaint 
prospective teachers with desirable high school choral material, 
(e) to illustrate ideals of choral singing and methods of attaining 
them. 

Topics: Familiar and sacred songs, the best songs of the great 
song writers, and the simpler works for mixed chorus. 

Music 221a and 221b. Voice. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Breathing exercises inducive to correct breathing; dic- 
tion, with emphasis placed on vowel formation; technical exercises 
to fit the individual need of the student. 

Sieber studies; simple sacred and secular songs. 

Music 222a and 222b. Voice. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

A continuation of the fundamentals introduced in the first 
year's work. 

Topics: Scales, with emphasis on evenness of scale; Vaccai and 
Marchesi studies; songs from the English, Italian and German 
schools. 

Music 223a and 223b. Voice. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Continuation of scales, supplemented by other exer- 
cises leading to more rapid vocalization; Ponofka studies; art songs, 
with attention to interpretation and artistic performance. 

Music 224a and 224b. Voice. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Advanced technical exercises; selections from the 
standard operas and oratorios; songs in French, Italian and Classi- 
cal Leider. 

VIOLIN 

Music 31a and 31b. Violin. Individual Instruction. No credit. 

See music fees. 

This work may be completed in one year, or it may require 
more time, depending upon the ability and application of the 
student. 



CATALOG 1940-41 101 

Topics: Such studies, scales, and exercises as will prepare the 
student to enter Music 231a. 

Music 230a. (Formerly Music 238a.) Violin. Class Instruc- 
tion. One hour. 

Purpose: To provide for the beginner who wishes to learn to 
play the violin an opportunity to study the instrument under the 
stimulus of class instruction; to start the beginner on the road 
toward sufficient playing and technical ability to teach violin in 
class and to train the string section of a school orchestra. 

Topics: Correct violin position for playing, resting and tuning; 
major scales and arpeggi in first position; bowing exercises; intro- 
duction to third position; study, discussion, and practice teaching in 
the class; and instrumental class procedure and methods. 

Books I and II of various beginner's methods, three and four 
part ensemble material, and simple sight reading. 

Music 230b. (Formerly Music 238b.) Violin. Class Instruc- 
tion. One hour. See music fees. 

Topics: Third position; bowing and finger exercises continued; 
fingering in half position explained and practiced; open harmonics; 
string and orchestral music introduced with careful attention 
given to correct position, tone production, and uniform bowing. 

Book III of various beginner's methods, and supplementary 
practice and sight reading material. 

Music 231a and 231b. Violin. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Purpose: To develop technique and solo ability; to train the 
student to participate in the varied chamber music combinations; to 
acquaint the student with the orchestral literature. 

Topics: Technical proficiency through the third position; two 
finger scales in these positions; two octave scales in all major keys; 
development of the technique of the left hand and of the bow arm; 
sight reading. 

Studies and exercises by Kayser and Wohlfart Danca, Varia- 
tions. Simple classical selections. 

Orchestra attendance required. 

Music 232a and 232b. Violin. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Study of the positions; scales and arpeggi in all major 
and minor keys, in all positions; chord study, double, triple and 
quadruple; finger shifting and bowing exercises; one- and two-finger 
scales preparatory to octaves; broken octaves; sight reading. 

Mazas, Opus 36; Kreutzer, Selected Studies; Fiorillo and Parre; 



102 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

miscellaneous pieces; one or more of the simpler concertos and 
sonatas. 

Orchestra attendance required. 

Music 233a and 233b. Violin. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Three octave scales; left and right hand pizzicato; 
varied bowing of the diminished seventh chord; all scales, ascending 
and descending on one string, with any one, two or three fingers; 
thirds; fingered harmonics. 

Sevcik, Opus 8; Fiorillo; Rode; Wilhelmj, School of Thirds; 
Handel, Six Sonatas; Tartini, Sonata in G Minor. 

Orchestra attendance required. 

Music 234a and 234b. Violin. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Scales in thirds and octaves; fingered octaves and 
tenths; cultivation and development of style and an understanding 
of the composition being played; sonatas and concertos of preceding 
years continued for public performance; extensive violin solo and 
chamber-music literature. 

The student is required to do ensemble work in string quartette, 
and must be able to play first violin in the college orchestra. 

WIND INSTRUMENTS 

Music 41a and 41b. Wind Instruments. Individual Instruction. 
No credit. 

See music fees. 

This course is an introduction to wind instruments and is 
designed to fit the needs of the non-musician who wishes to learn to 
play the wind instruments or who desires to prepare himself for 
Music 240a and b, 241a. The work may be completed in one year, 
or it may require more time, according to the ability and applica- 
tion of the student. 

Music 240a. (Formerly Music 248a.) Wood Wind Instruments. 
Class Instruction. One hour 

Purpose: To provide for the beginner who wishes to learn to 
play a wind instrument an opportunity to study it under the 
stimulus of group instruction; to demonstrate methods of class 
instruction for prospective teachers of high school bands and 
orchestras. 

Music 240b. (Formerly Music 248b.) Brass Wind Instru- 
ments. Class Instruction. One hour. 

Purpose: To provide for the beginner who wishes to learn to 
play a wind instriunent an opportunity to study it under the 



CATALOG 1940-41 103 

stimulus of group instruction; to demonstrate methods of class 
instruction for prospective teachers of high school bands and 
orchestras. 

Music 241a and 241b. (Formerly Music 243a and 243b.) Wind 
Instruments. Individual Instruction. Two hours. 

See music fees. 

Purpose: To provide instruction in wind instrument playing, 
to enable the student to become a proficient performer upon the 
instrument of his choice. 

Topics: Embouchre; principles of tone production; breathing; 
tonguing; phrasing; and theory, including major and minor scales, 
arpeggi, and easy transpositions. 

Music 246a and 246b. Band. One-half hour. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Purpose: To enable the student to become familiar with, and 
proficient in the performance of the best band literature; to enable 
the student to observe and study approved conducting practice; to 
acquaint the student and prospective director with efficient 
rehearsal routines. 

Music 247a and 247b. Band. One-half hour. 

Prerequisites: Music 246a and 246b. 
A continuation of Music 246b. 

ORGAN 

Music 271a and 271b. Organ. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: At least four years of piano study. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Elementary Instruction Book for the Hammond Organ; 
Clemens, Modern School for the Organ; Preparatory studies for 
manuals alone; Trios for manuals and pedals; Easy Arrangements 
for the Hammond Organ. 

Music 272a and 272b, Organ. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Buck, Studies in Pedal Phrasing; Bach, Selected 
Chorale Preludes; Easier Works of Mendelssohn, Guihnont, and 
other composers for organ. 

Music 273a and 273b. Organ. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Dupre, Seventy-nine Chorales; Bach, Selected Chorale 
Preludes; Selected Works from Guilmant, Rheinberger, Mendels- 
sohn; Selected Modern Compositions. 



104 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Music 274a and 274b. Organ. Individual Instruction. Two 
hours. 

See music fees. 

Topics: Bach; Chorale Preludes, Preludes and Fuges; 
Mendelssohn, Sonata I or II; Widor, Symphony II or IV, Selected 
Modem Compositions. 

VIOLONCELLO 

Music 81a and 81b. (Formerly Music 36a and 36b.) Violon- 
cello. Individual Instruction. No credit. 

See music fees. 

Music 281a and 281b. (Formerly Music 236a and 236b.) 
Violoncello. Individual Instruction. Two hours. 

See music fees. 

HISTORY AND APPRECIATION 

Music 255. (Formerly Music 201.) Music Appreciation. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: To foster a love for, and understanding of, good 
music. 

Topic: The best music of all times, reproduced on the phono- 
graph; folk music, art songs, instriunental forms; instruments and 
instrumental music; the humem voice. 

Music 356a. (Formerly Music 202 and 302.) Music History I. 
Two hours. 

Purpose: To increase the enjoyment and appreciation of the 
listener to music through the study of music history. 

Topics: The development of music from the earliest times up 
to the Romantic period, and important facts concerning composers 
and the like. Extensive use is made of phonograph records. 

Music 356b. (Formerly Music 203 and 303.) Music History II. 
Two hours. 

Purpose: To continue the study of Music History begun in 
Music 356a. 

Topics: Music from the Romantic period until the present time. 

METHODS 

Music 260. Public School Music. Two hours. 

Purpose: To consider the subject matter of music in the rural 
and in the graded school, together with the educational principles 
applied to its presentation, and to acquire some of the skills neces- 
sary to the teaching of grade school music. 

Topics: The aim of music in the grades, child voice, tone 
quality, unmusical singers, rhjrthmic development, staff notation, 
beginning music reading, use of the phonograph in singing and in 
rhythm and appreciation work, materials, and appreciation. 



CATALOG 1940-41 105 

Music 263. Methods of Teaching Music Appreciation, Two 
hours. 

Purpose: The primary aim of this course is to provide a 
knowledge of recorded materials and of the methods of organiza- 
tion and presentation of listening lessons in the first six grades. 

Topics: Topics discussed in the course will be music for little 
children, mimetic activities, rhythm band, free rhythmic expres- 
sion, directed rhythmic expression, story telling music, and music 
for quiet listening. Bibliographies of helpful materials about music 
and composers will be made. Types of phonographs and record- 
ings will be studied. Lists of records suitable for presentation in 
each grade will be made giving attention to the integration of music 
with the units of work taken up in the study of general subjects. 
There will also be some observation of lessons in music apprecia- 
tion taught in the training school. 

This is a required course for students majoring in music. It is 
suggested as the second music course for those who are working 
for the Standard Certificate. It is open as an elective to all 
students who are interested in the teaching of music appreciation, or 
to those who wish to increase their own enjoyment of music. 

Music 361. (Formerly Music 261.) Grade Methods and 
Materials. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Music 260 and 190, or the equivalent. 

Purpose: To prepare the advanced student for the teaching and 
supervision of music in the grades, and to acquaint him with 
methods and materials. 

Topics: Same as Music 260, but a more advanced considera- 
tion. The course includes observation and library reading. 

Music 362. (Formerly Music 262.) Conducting. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Music 260 and 190, or the equivalent. 

Purpose: To train students to conduct chorus and orchestra 
efficiently and to lead community singing. 

Topics: Technique of the baton, tempo, attach, release, phras- 
ing, dynamics, seating of the chorus and orchestra, discipline of 
rehearsals, and community music. 

Music 363a and 363b. Teaching of Piano in Classes. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Music 213, or the equivalent. 

Purpose: To prepare the advanced student for the teaching of 
class piano in the graded school. 

Topics: Methods of teaching piano in classes, observation, and 
practice teaching. 

Music 364a. Band and Orchestra Procedures and Materials. 
Two hours. 

Offered during five weeks of Stephen Collins Foster Music 
Camp. 



106 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Purpose: To assist directors (1) to establish and follow a 
definite plan of instrumental instruction on a semester basis, (2) 
to make possible the fullest use of available rehearsal time, and 
(3) to develop student responsibility for assisting in administra- 
tion of orchestra and band details. 

Topics: Analysis and organization of various courses of study 
for instrumental groups of varying abilities; rehearsal routines; 
training student sectional leaders; duties which may be assumed 
by students; adaptation of practice quarters to fit acoustical needs; 
program mechanics for public appearances; publicizing and inter- 
preting music activities; care of equipment; program and teaching 
materials; and consideration of the modified Prescott system and 
similar courses of study. 

Laboratory work with ensembles from the Foster Music Camp; 
orchestra, band sections, and small ensembles; participation in 
marching band maneuvers; fundamentals and advanced formations. 
Candidates will be required to conduct organizations in rehearsal 
and public performance, applying the principles presented in class. 

Music 364b. Band and Orchestra Procedures and Materials. 
Two hours. 

Continuation of Music 364a. 

THEORY 

Music 190. (Formerly Music 150.) Elements of Music. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Music 260, or equivalent music experience. 
Purpose: To provide, for those of some music experience, a 
thorough foundation in the elements of music notation and termi- 
nology, and the fundamental principles of reading by syllable, and 
to equip the student with such theoretical knowledge as is needed 
in order to begin profitably the study of harmony. 

Topics: Staff notation, notes, rests, clefs, scales (various 
modes), keys, meter, chromatic tones, intervals, chords, cadences, 
abbreviations and other symbols, music terms, elements of form, 
solmization, music writing and simple dictation. 

Music 291a. (Formerly Music 151 and 251.) Harmony I. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Music 190. 

Purpose: To provide an elementary knowledge of the construc- 
tion, classification, and progression of chords. 

Topics: Major and minor scales, intervals, triads; dominant 
seventh with its resolutions; inversions; and harmony at the key- 
board. 

Music 291b. (Formerly Music 153 and 253.) Harmony II. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Music 190 and 291a. 



CATALOG 1940-41 107 

Topics: Modulation by dominant seventh cadence in new key, 
common chord modulation, dominant ninth, chords of the seventh, 
and harmony at the keyboard. 

Music 292a. (Formerly Music 152 and 252.) Sight Singing and 
Ear Training I. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Music 190. 

Purpose: To begin development of aural perception of music 
symbols, to teach association of the symbol with the tone it repre- 
sents, and to teach reading and listening. 

Topics: Sight singing of melodic exercises in major and minor 
keys, in various rhythms; tone groups, and verbal and tonal dicta- 
tion, interval drill. 

Music 292b. (Formerly Music 154 and 254.) Sight Singing and 
Ear Training II. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Music 292a. 

Topics: More difficult sight singing and tonal dictation, simple 
harmonic recognition, and more complex rhythms. 

Music 391a. Formerly Music 251 and 351. Harmony III. Two 
hours. 

A continuation of Music 291b. 

Music 391b. (Formerly Music 253 and 353.) Harmony IV. Two 
hours. 

A continuation of Music 391a. 

Music 392a. (Formerly Music 252 and 352.) Sight Singing and 
Ear Training III. One hour. 

A continuation of Music 292b. 

Music 392b. (Formerly Music 254 and 354.) Sight Singing and 
Ear Training IV. One hour. 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Major Adams First Lieutenant Reeves 

First Lieutenant Noble Technical Sergeant Bentley 

The primary purpose of the Reserve Officers Training Corps 
(ROTC), is to strengthen our national defense by providing trained 
men who would be available in time of war. The secondary pur- 
pose is to give educational training which, through the years, has 
been found distinctly valuable by college students who have taken 
the course. 

As an essential element of military training, certain details of 
conduct are stressed in order that the student may complete his 
training well disciplined in mind and body. The particular methods 
employed by the military department are but a means to an end. 
The basic aim is to cultivate in each student habits of cheerful and 
unquestioning response to proper authority, loyalty, self control, 
precision, and alertness. These qualities together with professional 
knowledge and experience in command, develop leadership and 
personality; both valuable in peace and war. 

The Federal Government supports military training (ROTC) 
by providing uniforms or their money equivalent; by detailing in- 
structors and maintenance personnel from the Regular Army; by 
furnishing army equipment; and, in the case of advanced students; 
by quarterly money payments determined annually. R.O.T.C. train- 
ing is given by the college under the regulations and supervision 
of the War Department. Credit towards graduation is allowed as 
for other college courses. 

R.O.T.C. training contemplates four years of work. Hence, for 
those students who are ambitious and desire to obtain a commis- 
sion in the Officers Reserve Corps of the United States Army, it is 
absolutely necessary for them to start the course in their freshman 
year. However, any student who has two years of college remain- 
ing may enroll in the basic course. 

The four years work is divided into two parts: the BASIC 
course and the ADVANCED course, each of two years duration. 
Having enrolled in either course, a student will be required to 
complete the course unless he is released by proper authority or 
leaves school. However, the student must have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the basic course before he becomes eligible for enrollment 
in the advanced course. 

Enrollment in either course is voluntary and DOES NOT OBLI- 
GATE THE STUDENT FOR MILITARY SERVICE OR CALL TO 
DUTY IN ANY OTHER COMPONENT OF THE ARMY. Students 
must be citizens of the United States and pass the physical examina- 
tion in order to enroll in the course. One fifty-minute period pM" 



110 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

week is set aside for corps day. On this day, the entire R.O.T.C. 
is turned out as a unit for military ceremonies. It is essential that 
R.O.T.C. men keep this hour open although Corps Day is not held 
every week. 

Students who complete the basic course are given certificates 
of service and are considered valuable for national defense because 
they have had two years training and are potential non-commis- 
sioned officers. 

Satisfactory completion of the four yeats work and a six weeks 
summer camp makes the man enrolled eligible to receive a com- 
mission as a Second Lieutenant of Field Artillery in the Organized 
Reserve Corps. 

A reserve officer in peace time can be ordered to active duty 
training only AT HIS OWN REQUEST. In a declared National 
Emergency, reserve officers may be ordered to duty by the War 
Department. 

ALLOWANCES AND COSTS 

Students enrolling in the basic course receive no cash allow- 
ances but are issued articles of uniform for their personal wear 
to the value of approximately seventeen dollars. They are required 
to make a deposit of five dollars on these items to cover possible 
loss or damage NOT DUE TO ORDINARY FAIR WEAR OR TEAR. 
This deposit is similar to laboratory deposits for other courses and, 
if the articles of uniform are returned in good condition to the 
Custodian of Military Property at the end of the term, the entire 
amount of the deposit is returned to the student. The deposit is, of 
course, returned to students who may have to leave college, on 
return of the articles of uniform. 

The articles of uniform issued to the students of the Basic 
Course are expected to last him for two years, and must be cared 
for by the student. At the end of the first year, if the student 
intends to return to college the following year, his uniform is 
cleaned (at Government expense) tagged with his name, and 
packed away in moth preventive for reissue to him on his return. 
Band uniforms are furnished by the college and the Government 
pays an allowance to cover the cost of them. 

Text books for the basic course will cost about $1.25 a year; 
for the advanced course about $2.35. The total initial outlay will 
be $6.25 of which his deposit of $5.00 is returned to the student if 
he has taken good care of his uniform and government equipment. 

Students who enroll in the advanced course receive two allow- 
ances: uniform and subsistance. The subsistance allowance is a 
daily one and runs from his enrollment in the course for two 
academic years exclusive of the period of the summer camp. In 
all, it amounts to about one hundred and fifty dollars. The uniform 
allowance is given the college to buy uniforms and the government 



CATALOG 1940-41 111 

does not furnish uniforms for the advanced course students. All 
of this allowance must be spent on uniforms but the uniform be- 
comes the property of the student when he completes his course. 
Since good quality uniforms are purchased, they can be worn by 
the newly commissioned reserve officer. 

Upon completion of the first year of the advanced course, the 
student is required to attend a summer training camp for six weeks. 
His expenses going to and returning from camp are paid by the 
government. During his stay in camp, he is issued the necessary 
clothing for daily wear, is given free medical attention should it 
be necessary, is fed at government expense, and is paid about 
seventy cents a day. 

During the camp, the student puts into practice what he has 
learned during his instruction in the school R.O.T.C. unit, and 
engages in service practice with the Field Artillery guns, for which 
an ammunition allowance is provided. 

While in camp, he will normally do his work under the super- 
vision of the officers who have given him his previous instruction, 
but will also meet and work with other officers and men from other 
units of the R.O.T.C, truly a broadening experience. In addition, 
two officers devote their time to promote and supervise recreational 
and athletic activities in the R.O.T.C. camp. 

BASIC COURSE 

Military Science 101. Introduction to Military Science. One 
and one-half hours. 

Purpose: To give the student a thorough grotinding in the 
fundamentals of military service and the elements of field artillery 
gunnery. 

Topics: Military discipline and the customs of service; leader- 
ship; field artillery ammunition and material; duties of cannoneers 
and firing battery; military sanitation and first aid; obligations of 
citizenship; and elementary gunnery. 

Military Science 101a. Basic Course in Military Band. One 
and one-half hours. 

Military Science 102. Fundamentals of Military Training. 
One and one-half hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 101. 

Purpose: Continuation of introductory course in military 
science. 

Topics: Military history and policy; leadership; duties of can- 
noneers and firing battery. 

Military Science 102a. Basic Course in Military Band. One 
and one -half hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 101a. 



112 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Purpose: This course is a continuation of Military Science 
101a. 

Military Science 201. Basic Military Fundamentals. One and 
one-half hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 102. 

Purpose: To give the student basic instruction in the work of 
the battery commander's detail, in leadership, and in automotive 
vehicle construction and operation. 

Topics: Fire control instruments; map and aerial photograph 
reading; battery communications; leadership; automotive vehicle 
construction and operation. 

Military Science 201a. Basic Course in Military Band. One 
and one-half hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 102a. 

Military Science 202. Basic Military Fundamentals. One and 
one-half hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 201. 

Topics: This course is a continuation of Military Science 201. 

Military Science 202a. Basic Course in Military Band. One 
and one-half hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 201a. 

ADVANCE COURSE 

Military Science 301. First Year Advanced Course. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 202. 

Purpose: To introduce the student of military science to the 
work of field artillery personnel operating as a team and to 
advanced work in gunnery and the use of military motor vehicles. 

Topics: Reconnaissance; selection and occupation of position 
including duties of battery officers; use of battery commander's 
detail, field artillery signal communications; liaison with the in- 
fantry; leadership; gunnery, including elementary ballistics and dis- 
persion; preparation of fire; conduct of fire; military motor vehicles; 
and pistol markmanship. 

Military Science 302. First Year Advanced Course. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 301. 

Purpose: A study of military team work, advanced gunnery, 
and motor vehicles. 

Topics: This course is a continuation of Military Science 301. 

Military Science 401. Advanced Work in Military Science. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 302. 



CATALOG 1940-41 113 

Purpose: To develop in students of military science in the 
advanced course a facility in the functions of leadership by allow- 
ing them to act as officers in the R. O. T. C; to introduce them to 
the subjects of military tactics, military history and poUcy, military 
law and administration. 

Topics: Functions of command; instruction of basic R.O.T.C. 
students; military phases of motor vehicle operation; technical 
instruction in military tactics and work of the associated arms; 
military history and policy; the law of military offenses; the articles 
of war; courts-martial; and a study of the essentials of military 
administration. 

Military Science 402. Advanced Work in Military Science. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 401. 

Purpose: This course is a continuation of Military Science 401. 
Topics: This course is a continuation of the study of the sub- 
ject matter outlined in Military Science 401. 



DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES 

Mr. Hummel Mr. Cox Mr. LaFuze 

Mr. Kennamer Mr. Glover Mr. Rumbold 

Mr. Herndon 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

The two courses in survey of science are designed for elemen- 
tary teachers and supervisors. They are primarily content courses 
dealing with the general fields of the biological and physical 
sciences. The subject matter of these courses include also aims in 
teaching elementary science, methods of presentation, and ways of 
collecting, using, and preserving materials for the teaching of 
science. 

Science 110. Survey of Science. Three hours. 

Not open to students who have had one or more courses in the 
physical sciences. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to present the field of 
the physical sciences, their nature and interpretation. 

Topics: This course deals with the important topics in physics, 
chemistry, geology and related subjects. 

Science 111. Survey of Science. Three hours. 

Not open to students who have had one or more courses in the 
biological sciences. 

Purpose: This course is a continuation of Science 110 and pre- 
sents in broad outline the field of the biological sciences. 

Topics: This course deals with the important topics in biology, 
botany, zoology, and related subjects 

Science 310. Problems in General Science. Three hours. 

Not open to students who have had Science 110, Survey of 
Science, or Science 111, Survey of Science. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give the student a 
brief but adequate understanding of the field of general science. 

Topics: This course is devoted to the important problems and 
developments in the field of general science. 

Science 461. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science in 
Secondary Schools. Three hours. 

Required of students taking the professional science major. 

Purpose: To acquaint the prospective teacher with materials, 
devices and methods used in the teaching of science in secondary 
schools. 



116 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: Selection of textbooks, manuals, supplementary read- 
ings, etc.; organization of laboratory space and purchase of equip- 
ment; making simple equipment; securing free and low cost 
materials; preparation and presentation of work units; visual aids; 
science demonstrations; test construction and administration; club- 
work; specimen collection and preservation, etc. 

BIOLOGY 

Mr. Rumbold Mr. Glover Mr. LaFuze 

Biology 121. General Biology. Four hours. 

Purpose: An elementary course intending to give the student 
a survey of the plant and animal kingdoms; to introduce the student 
briefly to genetics; to study man's structure, development, and rela- 
tionship to other animals; to acquaint the student with the more 
complex phenomena of life. 

Topics: Fields of biology; history of biology; algae; fungi; 
mosses, ferns, higher seed plants; intermediate forms; protozoa; 
porifera; coelenterata; segmented worms; insecta; vertebrates. The 
frog — digestive system, blood system, nervous system, excretory 
system, reproductive system, respiratory system, embryology, 
homology, and analogy; protective coloration; adaptation; and 
genetics. 

Biology 231. Botany I. General Botany. Four hours. 

Purpose. An introductory course in botany whose purpose is 
to give the student fundamental principles regarding the structure, 
function and reproduction of representative seed plants. Occasional 
field trips are provided in order to study plants growing in the field 
and greenhouse. 

Topics: History of botany; cell structure and growth; detailed 
study of structure of root, stem, leaf, flower, fruit and seed; plant 
response to environment and plant heredity. 

Biology 232. Botany II. General Botany. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

Purpose: To give the student a wider knowledge of the field of 
botany from the lowest algae to seed plants; to give an organized 
view of the structure, reproduction, and interrelationship of the four 
great plant groups. 

Topics: Representatives of the four divisions of plants are 
studied as to their structure, reproduction, and economic impor- 
tance. Three lines of development are followed: (1) development 
of plant body from simple to complex, (2) development of the con- 
cept of alternations of generations, (3) development of sex in plants. 

Biology 241. Invertebrate Zoology. Four hours. 

Purpose: This course is intended for students who desire to 
major in the. biological sciences. It includes a detailed survey of the 
lower forms of the animal kingdom. 



CATALOG 1940-41 117 

Topics: Protozoa, porifera, coelenterata, ctenophora, platyhel- 
minthes, nemathelminthes, annelida, echinodermata, mollusca, and 
arthropoda in more detail than offered in Biology 121. Examples, 
characteristics, life histories, structures, and ecology with a discus- 
sion of their evolution. 

Biology 242. Comparative Anatomy. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121 or 241. 

Purpose: Intended for pre-medics and majors in biology and 
physical education. An intensive study of the comparative anatomy 
of the various systems of vertebrates, including dissection work. 

Topics: The comparative anatomy of the skin, digestive, circu- 
latory, respiratory, excretory, reproductive glands of internal secre- 
tion, skeletal, muscle, nervous and sense organs in vertebrates. 

Biology 261. Nature Study. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Science 111 or Biology 121. 

Purpose: This course is planned to meet the needs of students 
who are majoring in elementary education. The chief purpose of 
the course is to acquaint the prospective teacher with information 
and facts that may be used in an elementary study of nature. 

Topics: Animal life, including a study of birds, fish, reptiles, 
mammals and insects; plant life, including wild flowers, cultivated 
flowers, flower less plants and tree study; also elementary studies 
of the earth and sky, including soil, weather, stars and constella- 
tions. Proper methods of correlating such information with the 
subjects of health, geography, drawing, history, and arithmetic 
form a main consideration throughout the course. 

Biology 325. (Formerly Biology 225.) Genetics. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121, or 231, or 241. 

Purpose: Introduction to the laws of inheritance and their 
application to man, including a consideration of the factors under- 
lying race deterioration and race betterment. 

Topics: Mendel and Mendel's laws; recent workers including 
T. H. Morgan, chromosome theory of heredity, linkage, crossing 
over, interference, biometrics, race betterment, and race deteriora- 
tion. 

Biology 334. (Formerly Biology 234.) Plant Physiology and 
Ecology. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 231. 

Purpose: To give information concerning the physiological 
processes of plants and plant organs; to study plants in relation to 
their environment. 

Topics: The study of absorption, transpiration, food making, 
respiration, and growth; adjustments of plants to their environ- 
ment; plant distribution; plant societies. 



118 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Biology 335. (Formerly Biology 235.) Local Flora. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121 or 231, 

Purpose: To familiarize the student with the local flora, to 
instruct in the use of various systematic keys to flora, and to enable 
the student to recognize and classify the flowering plants. 

Topics: Various systems of classifications; the basis for scien- 
tific names. The most frequent and most important families of 
plants are studied from the standpoint of their flower and fruit 
characteristics as a basis of classification into families, genera and 
species. Identification of flowers is given a prominent place. 

Biology 343. (Formerly Biology 243.) Economic Entomology. 
Four hours. 

Purpose: To introduce to the student the most important 
insects economically on the farm, in the home, and in other 
habitats. Field work with the making of a collection of important 
economic insects. 

Topics: Taxonomy of insects, anatomy and physiology of 
insects, life history, economic importance, methods of control. 

Biology 444. (Formerly Biology 244 and 344.) Animal 
Parasites. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121 or 241. 

Purpose: Course is intended for students preparing for 
medicine or public health work. A consideration of the animal 
parasites with particular emphasis upon those infesting man and 
their treatment. 

Topics: Protozoa-Sarcodina (amoebic dysentery); Mastigophora 
(Trypanosames) ; Spirocheatacea; Infusoria; Sporozoa, including 
various types of malaria; Platyhelminthes (flukes and tapes); 
Nemathelminthes (ascaris, hook worm, trichina, whip worm, 
elephantiasis, guinea worm, etc.); prevalence of parasitic worms and 
remedial measures; animal parasites among Mollusca, Annelida, 
and Arthropoda; Archnida (mites and ticks); Arthropoda (lice, bed 
bugs, fleas, flies, mosquitoes); poisonous animals. 

Biology 445. (Formerly Biology 245 and 345.) Embryology. 
Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology 121 and 242, 

Purpose: This course is designed primarily for majors and 
minors in the department and pre-medical students, acquainting 
them with the fundamental principles of embryology as found in 
the animal kingdom. 

Topics: Complete study of the embryology of the starfish, 
frog, and chicken, with considerable work on mammalian 
embryology. 



CATALOG 1940-41 119 

Biology 481. (Formerly Biology 381.) Animal Physiology. 
Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121 or 241. 
Purpose: This course is intended for majors in home economics, 
physical education, and biology. It is a course in functional zoology 
with a detailed study of the physiological processes in the human 
body. 

Topics: Physiology of respiration, muscles, reproduction, 
excretion, nervous system, circulation, and digestion. 

CHEMISTRY 

Mr. Cox Mr. Herndon 

The chief function of this department is the training of chem- 
istry and science teachers. However, courses are offered to meet 
all requirements for medicine, dentistry, engineering and graduate 
work. 

Chemistry 111. (Formerly Chemistry 211.) General Chemis- 
try. Five hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give the student the 
fundamental principles of Chemistry. 

Topics: A brief history of the development of the science of 
chemistry; the chemical nature of matter; preparation and 
properties of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, carbon and 
sodixim; the gas laws; the chemistry and purification of water; the 
theory of solutions; acids, bases, salts and neutralization; the theory 
of ionization and its applications; microcosmic chemistry; periodic 
law. 

Chemistry 112. (Formerly Chemistry 212.) Inorganic Chemis- 
try. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111. 

Purpose: Continuation of Chemistry 111. 

Topics: Sulfur and compounds; phosphorus and compounds; 
ceramics; law of mass action and equilibrium; colloids; metallurgy, 
radioactivity; periodic numbers and their significance. 

Chemistry 213. Qualitative Analysis. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 and 112. 

Purpose: A continuation of Inorganic Chemistry with special 
reference to the separation and identification of the metals and non- 
metals and the theory of solutions. 

Topics: Simple equilibrium; complex equilibrium; solubility 
product law; law of precipitation; law of solution; law of the com- 
mon-ion; introduction to the use of the spectroscope and microscope 
in analysis; identification of minerals. 

Chemistry 216. Quantitative Analysis. Five hours. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 213. 



120 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Purpose: To give fundamental experience in the technique of 
quantitative determination. 

Topics: The principles and use of the analytical balances; cali- 
bration of weights; the laws of partition; principles of stoichiome- 
try; quantitative determinations of ordinary metals and non-metals; 
gravimetric, volumetric, and electrolytic determinations. 

Chemistry 220. Bio-organic Chemistry. Four hours. 

Open only to majors in home economics. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 and 112. 

Purpose: To give an elementary knowledge of organic 
chemistry. 

Topic: A study of the applications of organic chemistry to 
food, nutrition and other problems in home economics. 

Chemistry 310. (Formerly Chemistry 215.) Organic Chemistry. 
Five hours. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 and 112. 

Purpose: To give a general survey of the principal compounds 
of aliphatic organic chemistry. 

Topics: Methane series and derivatives; ethylene series and 
derivatives; acetylene series and derivatives; poly cyclic compounds; 
glucids, lipids, protids, and related compounds. 

Chemistry 312. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 310. 

Purpose: To continue Chemistry 310; to give a general survey 
of the aromatic organic compounds, and to acquaint the student 
with some of the theories of modern organic chemistry. 

Topics: Aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, phenols, amines, 
diazonium compounds, dyes, drugs, etc.; theory of color, molecular 
rearrangements, tautomerism, etc. 

Chemistry 313. Biochemistry. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 310. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the chemical reactions 
of digestion and metabolism. 

Topics: Qualitative tests for digested substances in vivo and 
in vitreo; chemical nature of muscle, blood and bone, enzyme 
action; urine analysis. 

Chemistry 411. (Formerly Chemistry 311.) Advanced Quanti- 
tative Analysis. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 216. 

Purpose: To familiarize the student with the different methods 
and instruments used in quantitative analysis. 

Topics: Analysis of ores; potentiometric determinations; the 
principle and use of the colorimeter; polariscope; gas analysis; com- 
bustion train. 



CATALOG 1940-41 121 

Chemistry 415. Physical Chemistry. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 216. 

Purpose: To broaden the student's conception and understand- 
ing of physico-chemical laws. 

Topics: Properties of gases, liquids and solids; properties of 
solutions; equilibrium; chemical kinetics; laws of thermodynamics; 
electro-chemistry; phase rule. 

Chemistry 430. Problems in Chemistry. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemistry. 

Purpose: To develop the student's initiative in laboratory 
work; to acquaint the student with the methods of research. 

Topics: Research in physical, organic, analytical or bio-chem- 
ical problems. 

GEOLOGY 

Mr. Kennamer 

Geology 201. (Formerly Geology 301.) Physical Geography 
and Geology. Three hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed (a) to give the student a 
knowledge of the land forms, their origin and history, their changes, 
and their influence on man, (b) to teach the use of geologic and 
topographic maps, and (c) to teach the student to interpret present 
day environment. 

Topics: Materials of the earth; weathering; work of wind; 
work of ground water; work of streams; work of glaciers; the 
ocean and its work; the structure of the earth; earthquakes; vol- 
canoes and igneous intrusions; metamorphism; mountains and 
plateaus; ore deposits; soils, their classification and origin; major 
physiographic features, their origin and influence on man. 

PHYSICS 

Mr. Hummel 

Physics 102. Household Physics. Three hours. Primarily for 
students majoring or minoring in Home Economics. 

Purpose: To study the principles of physics and their applica- 
tions in the home. 

Topics: Forces and their effects; work, energy and power; 
elementary machines; heating, refrigeration, and air conditioning; 
principles of electricity, sound and light; applications in the home 
and community such as the telephone, radio, talking pictures, trans- 
portation, transmission of pictures, automatic controls. 

Physics 201. Mechanics, Heat and Sound. Five hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 107. 

Purpose: A general course treating mechanics and heat, and 
given not only for those students who intend to teach physics in 



122 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

high school, but also for those students who expect to enter the 
fields of engineering or medicine. 

Topics: Falling bodies; Newton's laws of motion and applica- 
tions to practical problems; curvilinear motion; composition and 
resolution of forces; the laws of equilibrium and their application 
to various problems; work and energy; machines; momentum, 
elasticity; simple harmonic motion; hydrodynamics, heat and 
molecular physics including thermometry, pressure, expansion of 
solids, liquids, and gases, and modern radiation theory. 

Physics 202. Electricity, Magnetism, Wave Motion and Sound, 
and Light. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Physics 201. 

Purpose: This course is a continuation of Physics 201 and 
should be taken by the student who expects to teach physics or 
general science in high school, or to enter the engineering field. 

Topics: Electrostatics, the nature of electricity, properties of a 
moving electric charge (chemical, heating, and magnetic effects), 
magnetism. Ohm's law, measurement of electrical quantities, 
sources of electrical energy, Lenz's law, inductance and capacity, 
alternating current, and electric waves and radio. 

Physics 300. Modern Physics. Five hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201, Physics 202, Mathematics 251 or 
registration in Mathematics 251. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the general field of 
modern physics before he studies the special subjects in more 
detail. 

Topics: Historical introduction, alternating current, electro- 
magnetic theory of radiation, properties of moving charged bodies, 
the electron, kinetic theory of gases, thermionics, the photoelectric 
effect, x-rays and their applications, Bohr theory of spectra, 
periodic law and atomic structure, critical potentials, radio and 
television, radioactivity and isotopes, geophysics, astrophysics, 
relativity, specific heats, electrical resistance, high frequency sound 
waves, and recent development in physics. 

Physics 302. Introduction to Physical Optics. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201 and 202. 

Purpose: To study the nature of light and its related 
phenomena. 

Topics: Wave motion, reflection and refraction, further study 
of lenses, the telescope, dispersion, facts concerning the spectrum, 
interference, diffraction, plane polarized light, the electromagnetic 
theory of light, the quantum theory and origin of spectra, the 
dilemma. 

Physics 303. Heat. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201 and 202. 



CATALOG 1940-41 123 

Purpose: To study the nature of heat more comprehensively 
than can be done in Physics 201. 

Topics: Historical review of theories and discoveries; ther- 
mometry; specific heats; thermal expansion; transfer of heat; first 
law of thermodynamics; radiation; change of state; continuity of 
state; introduction to thermodynamics, production of low tempera- 
tures; production of high temperatures. 

Physics 304. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201, 202, and Mathematics 251. 

Purpose: To study the theory of electricity and magnetism. 

Topics: Magnetism, the electric current, electrostatics, elec- 
trolysis, thermo-electricity, electromagnetics, alternating currents, 
electromagnetic radiation, conduction in gases, electrons and atoms. 

Physics 306. Sound. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201 and 202. 

Purpose: To study sound and acoustics more intensely than 
can be done in Physics 201. 

Topics: Theory of vibration; vibrating systems and sources of 
sound; transmission of sound; reception, transformation and meas- 
urement of sound energy; technical applications. 

Physics 401. (Formerly Physics 301.) An Advanced Course in 
Mechanics. Five hours. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 252 or registration in Mathematics 
252, and Physics 201 and 202. 

Purpose: To give the student a firm grasp of the physical prin- 
ciples of theoretical mechanics. 

Topics: Elemental concepts of mechanics; rectilinear motion of 
a particle; curvilinear motion; particle dynamics from the point of 
view of energy; statics of a particle; statics of a rigid body; dynamics 
of a rigid body; constrained motion; oscillations; motion of aggre- 
gates of particles; deformable bodies and wave motion; mechanics 
of fluids. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 



Mr. Jones 
Mrs. Case 
Mr. Cuff 
Mr. Edwards 



Mr. Ferrell 

Miss Hansen 

Mr. Kinzer 

Miss Lee 



Mr. Mattox 

Mr. O'Donnell 

Miss Schnieb 

Mrs. Tyng 



TRAINING SCHOOL STAFF 

Miss Alvis Mr. Lassiter Miss Rush 
Mr. Coates Miss Lingenfelser Mr. Samuels 
Miss Evans Miss Neale Miss Story- 
Mr. Glover Miss Pugh Mr. Walker 
Mr Grise Miss Regenstein Miss Wilson 
Mr. Houtchens Mr. Rigby Miss Wingo 

Education 203. Principles of Teaching. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Education 111. 

Purpose: (a) To develop an understanding of the principles 
basic to effective teaching, (b) to acquaint the student with the 
fundamental problems of teaching and to apply the teaching prin- 
ciples to the possible solutions of those problems. 

Topics: Meaning of education; meaning and function of the 
school; meaning and evidences of learning; purposeful activities; 
selection and organization of subject matter; various types of class 
procedure; making assignments; standards for judging teaching. 

Education 210. Educational Psychology. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To introduce the future teacher to the funda- 
mental principles of educational psychology, (b) to teach the stu- 
dent to apply the psychology of learning to classroom activities, 
and (c) to provide some acquaintance with the field of measure- 
ment. 

Topics: The field of educational psychology, heredity and 
environnaent, growth and development, incentives and motives, 
feelings, attitudes and emotions, mental hygiene, intelligence and 
its measurement, individual differences and the school, the learn- 
ing process, economy and efficiency in learning, factors influencing 
learning, transfer of training, reasoning, imagining, and problem solv- 
ing, the measurement of learning, socialization and guidance. 

Education 262. Fundamentals in Elementary Education. Four 
hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to (a) provide a gradu- 
ated approach to student teaching in the elementary grades, (b) 
organize units of work, both group and individual, (c) introduce 
methods of teaching in the elementary grades, (d) learn to make 



126 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

lesson plans, (e) give practice in organizing materials of instruc- 
tion, (f) evaluate theories of teaching in the light of classroom pro- 
cedure, by direct observation in the training school, by assigned 
readings, and by classroom instruction, (g) acquaint the student 
with the common school problems and activities which arise in the 
experience of teachers, such as daily program, school sanitation, 
economy of time, discipline, class and individual instruction, and 
(h) to help the student sense the relation of the school to the com- 
munity and cultivate a constructive and harmonious contact between 
the two. 

Topics: Standards for observing class work; lesson planning; 
daily program; teaching pre-primer reading, reading in the ele- 
mentary grades, oral and written expression, spelling, number work, 
social studies, nature study, health and seat work; measuring 
progress of instruction; the meaning and the function of the school; 
school organization and equipment; class organization; function 
of the course of study, curricular activities, classroom routine and 
equipment; school sanitation; economy of time; discipline and com- 
munity cooperation. 

Education 265. Supervised Student Teaching. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Education 262. 

Purpose: It is the purpose of this course (1) to develop by 
practice the skills, techniques and controls essential to successful 
classroom procedure in the elementary school and (2) to acquaint 
the student teacher with modern devices and materials of ele- 
mentary education. 

Topics: Observation of the activities of the classroom and 
materials of instruction. Under the training teachers' supervision 
activities are planned, and help is given in the performance of 
routine. Actual class teaching begins with a small group of chil- 
dren, but near the end of the term the student teacher is expected 
to take charge of the entire room. All student teachers meet the 
training teacher under whom they work for a one-hour conference 
period daily. 

Education 267. Directed Observation and Participation in the 
Elementary School. Eight hours. 

This course is not open to students who have had Fundamentals 
of Elementary Education. Approval of the Dean of the college is 
required for enrollment. 

Purpose: This is a laboratory course, the primary purpose of 
which is to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of ele- 
mentary education and with the educational program and practices 
of the elementary school. This course is a substitute for funda- 
mentals of elementary education and student teaching for the pro- 
visional elementary certificate and is a prerequisite for student 
teaching at the senior college level. 



CATALOG 1940-41 127 

Topics: This course includes a great deal of observation and 
participation and deals with the problems of lesson planning, daily 
program, school organization and equipment, class organization, 
the course of study, curricular activities, teaching techniques, 
school sanitation, discipline, playground supervision, and com- 
munity cooperation. 

Education 301. (Formerly Education 201.) The Junior High 
School. Two hours. 

Purpose: To familiarize prospective high school principals and 
teachers with the aims, purposes, and objectives of the junior high 
school. 

Topics: Origin, development, and present status of the junior 
high school movement; the place of the junior high school in the 
public school system; the aims, purposes, and objectives of the 
junior high school; evaluation of types of programs; the junior 
high school plant; library, apparatus, and equipment of the junior 
high school. 

Education 302. Pupil Accounting. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To give specific preparation for the work of 
attendance officer, (b) to give prospective superintendents and 
teachers a better understanding of the problem of attendance and 
its effect on the efficiency of the school. 

Topics: Relation of attendance to pupil progress; social and 
economic factors which affect attendance; school census; personnel 
records. In developing these topics a study will be made of per- 
sonnel work in typical schools of Kentucky. 

Education 313. (Formerly Education 114 and 213.) Child 
Psychology. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint the student with the most important 
facts and principles relative to childhood, (b) to describe the 
behavior and activities which may be expected of a child in any 
stage of development, (c) to teach the student how to observe and 
to interpret the behavior of children, and (d) to cultivate a 
sympathetic and understanding attitude toward child life. 

Topics: Introduction, biological foundations, early childhood, 
motivation, emotion, language, manipulation, play, physical 
development, mental life, learning, intelligence, character and 
personality, adolescence, individual differences, and guidance of 
children. 

Education 314. (Formierly Education 214.) Psychology of 
Adolescence. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint students with the most important 
facts and principles relative to adolescence, (b) to describe adoles- 
cent nature, growth, and development so as to facilitate both 
reliable prediction and suitable guidance of behavior during the 



128 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

teens, (c) to teach students how to solve problenns of adolescent 
behavior, and (d) to cultivate a sympathetic and an understanding 
attitude toward adolescence. 

Topics: Introduction, physical development, mental develop- 
ment, growth of intelligence, adolescent instincts and interests, 
emotional life, learning and forgetting, moral and religious develop- 
ment, adolescent personality, disturbances of personality, hygiene 
of adolescence, prediction of adolescent behavior, and guidance of 
adolescent behavior. 

Education 354. (Formerly Education 164 and 254.) Reading 
in the Elementary School. Three hours. 

Purpose: To familiarize the elementary school teacher with 
the best modern principles, methods, and devices; to enable him to 
see these theories carried out in actual practice; to acquaint him with 
the best literature of the teaching of reading, together with the best 
basal and supplementary texts available for this purpose. 

Topics: Objectives of reading in the elementary school; read- 
ing in the primary and intermediate grades; the place of oral read- 
ing in the grades; individual differences; word difficulties; phonics; 
measuring reading instruction; motivation; materials of instruction. 

Education 355. Reading in the Jimior and Senior High School. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with methods, devices, and 
procedures in teaching remedial reading; to outline a develop- 
mental program of reading for normal and superior pupils; to pro- 
vide laboratory demonstrations and practice in diagnostic and 
remedial procedures; to study various patterns of writing with 
appropriate reading techniques; to help students study objectively 
the maturity of their own reading performance. 

Topics: Among the topics considered in this laboratory course 
are study procedures; evaluation of standardized tests in reading; 
analysis and correction of common difficulties at the secondary 
level; guidance of reading activities in the content fields; materials 
of instruction; reading interests and tastes; instruments for 
diagnosing and remedying reading difficulties. 

Education 364. Fundamentals of Secondary Education. Four 
hours. 

This course is a prerequisite to student teaching and is 
intended to prepare students to participate in actual classroom 
teaching by enabling them to become thoughtful and alert 
students of secondary education. 

Purpose: To prepare students for a graduated approach to 
supervised student teaching on the secondary school level; and to 
help students to develop a pedagogical method of thinking in 
secondary education. 

Topics: Problems of the secondary school; the professional 
responsibilities of teachers to pupils, co-workers, and the com- 



CATALOG 1940-41 129 

munity; the setting up of aims and the evaluation of teaching; 
practice in the selection and organization of subject matter and 
available materials of instruction; remedial procedures, measuring 
pupil progress, and methods of adjustment to needs of individual 
pupils; directed observation in the secondary school. 

Education 421a. Tests and Measurements for the Elementary 
School. Two hours. 

Purpose: To determine the need for tests and measurements 
in the elementary school; to evaluate the ordinary examination and 
find ways to improve it; to acquaint the student with the outstand- 
ing standardized tests now in use in the elementary school; to 
deterniine the advantages and disadvantages of standardized 
examinations; to develop some degree of skill in the construction 
and administration of tests; to familiarize the student with the 
elementary statistical procedures necessary for an adequate xinder- 
standing of the results of a testing program in the elementary 
school. 

Topics: Historical survey of the development of mental and 
educational tests in the elementary school; the nature and classifi- 
cation of standardized tests; the construction of tests; the impor- 
tance of accuracy of measurement; reliability; validity; the place of 
standardized measurements in the elementary testing program; 
standards for the selection of tests; interpretation of test data; the 
use of test results for comparison, classification, promotion, guid- 
ance, diagnosis, and for measuring the efficiency of instruction. 

Education 421b. Tests and Measurements for the Secondary 
School. Two hours. 

Purpose: To determine the need for accuracy in measurement 
in the secondary school; to evaluate the traditional type of examina- 
tion and find ways to improve it; to acquaint the student with the 
most important standardized tests for the secondary school; to study 
the advantages and disadvantages of standardized measures; to 
develop some degree of skill in the construction and use of tests; to 
familiarize the student with elementary statistical procedures; to 
show the social, educational, and vocational significance of tests in 
the secondary school. 

Topics: Elementary statistical procedures; historical survey of 
the development of mental and educational tests in the secondary 
school; the nature and classification of tests; the construction and 
use of tests; reliability; validity; the importance of standardized 
measures; methods of improving the traditional type of examina- 
tion; standards for the selection of tests; the use of test results for 
comparison, classification, promotion, guidance, prognosis, diagnosis; 
measuring the efficiency of teaching in the secondary school, and 
the like. 

Education 441. (Formerly Education 341.) The Elementary 
School Curriculum. Three hours. 

E. S. T. C— 5 



ISO EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint the student with the literature on 
curriculum construction, and (b) to develop fundamental principles 
which underlie the construction and interpretation of the curric- 
ulum and to apply these principles to the organization of specific 
units of subject matter. 

Topics: Objectives of education, function of the school, func- 
tion of the curriculum, the curriculvun as related to the objectives 
of education, criteria for evaluating curricula, and need and pro- 
cedure for curriculum construction and revision. 

Education 442. Organization and Administration of Elemen- 
tary Education. Three hours. 

Purpose: To present the important phases of the organization 
and administration of the elementary school. 

Topics: Aims and objectives of the elementary school, types of 
elementary school organization, time allotments, attendance, library 
service, classification and promotion of pupils, health, publicity, spe- 
cial classes, plant, office management, organization for supervision, 
the principal and his opportunity for leadership. 

Education 453. Public School Administration. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint the student with some of the fvmda- 
mental problems connected with the administration of the public 
schools, (b) to present the philosophy of public school administra- 
tion, and (c) to familiarize the student with the duties and respon- 
sibilities of school administrators. 

Topics: The need for school administration, the place of school 
administration in the public school system, the school board, admin- 
istrative officials of school systems, business management of schools, 
the school plant, public relations, the curriculum, schedule making, 
selection of teachers, personnel problems, pupil accounting, the test- 
ing program, the health program, the school library, and other prob- 
lems related to the administration of public schools. 

Education 454. Public School Supervision. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To show the need for the supervision of instruc- 
tion in the public schools, (b) to plan a desirable program of super- 
vision, (c) to evaluate the various agencies of supervision, and (d) to 
determine the duties and responsibilities of the supervisor. 

Topics: The purpose and importance of the program of super- 
vision, organization of the school for supervisory purposes, the rela- 
tion of the school to the community, the improvement of teaching, 
the relation between the supervisor and the teacher, classroom 
visitation, conferences with teachers, in-service preparation of 
teachers, the agencies of supervision, professional reading, profes- 
sional organizations and other problems related to supervision of 
teaching in the public school. 

Education 463. Supervised Student Teaching. Eight hours. 



CATALOG 1040-41 111 

Offered during the senior year with all day teaching for one- 
half semester. 

Purpose: To develop the art of teaching. 

Topics: Observation, participation, and responsible room 
teaching; child study with special case study problems and remedial 
work; development of skills and techniques desirable for good 
school procedure; the location, collection, and organization of 
materials of instruction; study of community occupations, resources, 
social and economic problems; experience in meeting parents, visit- 
ing homes, participation in social programs of school and com- 
munity; experience in directing various kinds of activities including 
routine school duties, field trips, and extra-curricular program; 
acquaintance with the school organization, school policies, system 
of records and the like; learning how to maintain desirable pupil- 
teacher relationship. 

Education 464. Principles of Secondary Education. Three 
hours. 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint the student with the development 
of our present system of secondary education and its implications, 
(b) to present a desirable philosophy of secondary education, (c) to 
present some of the outstanding problems in the secondary school, 
(d) to analyze the present curricula with hope of improving the 
same. 

Topics: Growth and background of American secondary 
school, variability and selection of the pupil, aims and functions of 
secondary education, relation to elementary and higher education, 
forms of organization, comparison between European and American 
schools, the rural high school, vocational education, trends and 
methods of curriculum construction, the secondary school offerings, 
extra-curricular activities, guidance and community relationship, 
the staff, plant and library, cost, a vision of secondary education. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Education 501. School Administration. Two hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give students tech- 
nical preparation for the school superintendency. 

Topics: The state as a fundamental school imit; local units 
for school control; federal relations to education; duties and powers 
of the school board; duties and powers of the superintendent; the 
administration of teacher personnel. 

Education 502. School Administration. Two hours. 

Pvu-pose: This course is planned to give students technical 
preparation for the school superintendency. 

Topics: The school census; attendance; pupil accounting; 
records and reports; business administration; preparation and 



132 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

administration of the budget; cost accounting; fiscal control; indebt- 
edness; short term borrowing; bonds; general school law; public 
relations; and school publicity. 

Education 503. School Administration. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give students technical 
preparation for the school superintendency. 

Topics: Selection of school sites; building plans and designs; 
school building management; maintenance and operation of school 
plants; the purchase and use of school supplies; organization of 
school libraries; and auxiliary agencies. 

Education 510. The Improvement of Instruction in the Elemen- 
tary School. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course deals with the techniques and methods 
for improving instruction in the elementary school. 

Topics: Current problems of instruction; recent trends in in- 
struction; methods for improving instruction in the social studies, 
practical arts, health education, and other subjects included in the 
elementary school. 

Education 511. Elementary School Supervision. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give a general survey of 
the supervision of instruction. 

Topics: Problems of supervision; current practices in super- 
vision; and problems of organizing instruction to meet the increas- 
ing responsibilities of the school. Emphasis will be placed upon 
the discussion and development of the concrete educational prob- 
lems of the members of the group. 

Education 512. Curriculum Problems of the Elementary 
School. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is a survey of the curriculiun problems 
of the elementary school. 

Topics: Curriculum programs; principles of curriculum con- 
struction; curriculum materials; and principles and methods of 
evaluating the effectiveness of the elementary school curriculum. 

Education 515. Advanced Educational Psychology. Two 
hours. 

Purpose: (a) To enable the student to study intensively and 
extensively the major topics of educational psychology as developed 
in outstanding research studies and textbooks; (b) to improve the 
student's ability to teach by increased knowledge of how learning 
occurs; (c) to discuss conditions for effective school work; and (d) 
to apply the principles of psychology in other school relationships. 

Topics: Motivation and adjustment; intelligence and its 
measurement; psychology of learning; measures of achievement 
and of personality; and psychology in other school relationships. 

Education 521. Visual Aids in Education. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of the importance and use of visual aids in education. 



CATALOG 1940-41 183 

Topics: The need for visual aids in education; the philosophy 
and content of visual education; objects; models; exhibits, museum 
materials; motion pictures; instructional films; and graphic 
materials. 

Education 522. Mental Hygiene. Two hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint students with the psychology of adjust- 
ment and of mental health. 

Topics: Development of mental hygiene; origins of behavior; 
varieties of maladjustments; techniques of mental hygiene; and 
applications of positive mental hygiene. 

Education 531. History of Education. Two hours. 

Purpose: (a) To enable the student to imderstand and appre- 
ciate the place education holds in the development of modem civili- 
zation; (b) to analyze and interpret modern educational theories 
and practice in the light of our educational heritage; (c) to familiar- 
ize the student with the rise and development of public education 
in the United States. 

Topics: Brief survey of the history of education in ancient and 
medieval times with special reference to the contribution of Greece 
and Rome and Christianity to modern education; educational in- 
fluences of the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation; the 
role of the doctrine of formal discipline; education influences of 
Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, and Herbart. 

Education 532. History of Education in the United States. Two 
hours. 

Purpose: This course is a survey of the development and 
growth of public education in the United States. 

Topics: Rise and development of public education in the 
United States with emphasis upon the work of Horace Mann, Henry 
Barnard, and James G. Carter; sociological, psychological, and 
scientific movements in education; desirable educational reorgan- 
izations; brief study of the history and development of public edu- 
cation in Kentucky. 

Education 536. Philosophy of Education. Two hours. 

Purpose: (a) To lead the student to recognize that education 
is the process by which one's attitudes toward society are formed; 
(b) to assist the student in discovering the relation between educa- 
tion and the character of government under which he lives; (c) to 
help him to understand the meaning of education in his effort to 
achieve the abundant life. 

Topics: The meaning of education; educational values; educa- 
tion and democracy; the development of ideals; education as a 
necessity of life; education as growth; interest and discipline; 
thinking in education; the nature of the subject matter; education 
and philosophy. 



134 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Education 542. Applied Statistical Methods. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give the student a thorough 
understanding of the use of statistical methods in education. 

Topics: The need for statistical methods; frequency distribu- 
tions; class intervals; measures of central tendency; measures of 
variability; comparison of groups; graphic methods; measures of 
relative position; the normal probability curve; reliability of meas- 
ures of central tendency and variability; calculating machines; 
simple correlation; and interpretation of statistical data. 

Education 543. Problems in Rural Education. Two hours. 

Purpose: To familiarize the student with the important prob- 
lems in the field of rural education. 

Topics: Among the subjects considered are the problems of 
attendance; supervision of instruction; techniques of teaching; 
libraries; transportation of pupils; parent-teacher organizations; 
lunchrooms; playground activities; and the like. 

Education 558. Public School Finance. Two hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the problems of financ- 
ing the public schools of the land. Some attention is paid to gen- 
eral tax theory, but most of the time is spent on practical financial 
problems of the local school districts, and the financial relationship 
between the local district and the state. 

Topics: Among the topics studied the following may be men- 
tioned: The growth of the cost of education; comparative costs in 
education; the school budget; financial records and accounts; school 
indebtedness; control of school finances; financial aspects of school 
publicity; educational inequalities; the units of school support; and 
apportioning the benefits and the sources of public school revenue. 

Education 561. High School Administration. Two hours. 

Purpose: To present the fundamental principles of high school 
organization and administration. 

Topics: Secondary school organization; the principal; the staff; 
the pupils; program of studies; schedules; community relationships; 
records and reports; articulation; library; plant; finance; and other 
important topics pertaining to the high school. 

Education 562. Curriculum Problems of the Secondary School. 
Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to aid teachers, principals, 
supervisors, and superintendents in adjusting the general curric- 
ula and courses of study to the needs of the secondary school. 

Topics: Aims of the public secondary school; local materials 
of educational value; use of textbooks; plans for evaluating curric- 
ulum procedures; and methods of making the high school a more 
effective agency. 

Education 563. The Improvement of Instruction in the Secon- 
dary School. Two hours. 



CATALOG 1940-41 135 

Purpose: This course is designed to help teachers, supervisors, 
principals, and superintendents improve the quality of instruction 
in the high school. 

Topics: Qualities of good teaching; techniques of improving 
instruction; procedures for evaluating classroom teaching; the place 
of extra-curricular activities in the school program; and responsi- 
bilities of the school with respect to the community. 

Education 565. Guidance and Pupil Adjustment. Two hours. 

Purpose: The aim of this course is to acquaint the student 
with fundamental principles and methods of guidance and pupil 
adjustment. 

Topics: Nature and goals of guidance; organization of guid- 
ance or adjustment programs; functions of administrators, super- 
visors, guidance specialists, and classroom teachers in the guidance 
program. 

Education 570. Seminar. One or two hours. 

Education 571. Seminar. One or two hours. 

Education 572. Seminar. One or two hours. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Mr. Kinzer 
Philosophy 301. History of Philosophy. Three hours. 

Purpose: To present the development of philosophic thought 
from the ancient Greeks to the Thirteenth Century. 

Topics: A careful study of the ideas of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, 
Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, Neo-Platonism, the Patristic period, 
and Scholasticism. 

Philosophy 302. History of Philosophy. Three hours. 

Purpose: To present the problems of philosophy and the 
development of ideas from Descartes to the present. 

Topics: A careful study of the ideas of individual philosophers 
and their positions with respect to the traditional schools, e.g., 
idealism, realism and pragmatism. Emphasis will be placed upon 
Bacon, Locke, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Hegel, James and Dewey. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 211. General Psychology. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To present the problems, methods, and facts of 
psychology as a science; (b) to show applications of psychology; 
(c) to teach students to apply psychological principles to situations 
in which they may be helpful. 

Topics: The problems, methods, and subject matter of psychol- 
ogy; the physiological basis of reactions; native and acquired urges; 
the nature of instincts and emotions; adjustments; laws of learning, 
economy in learning; general intelligence and special aptitudes; 
personality; individuality; applications of psychology. 



DIVISION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 



Dr. Farris 
Mr. Carter 
Miss Cherry- 



Mr. Hembree 

Miss Hood 

Mr. Hughes 

Mr. McDonough 



Mr. Rankin 

Mr. Samuels 

Miss White 



Dr. Farris 
Mr. Carter 



HEALTH 

Mr. Hembree 

Miss Hood 

Mr. Hughes 



Mr. McDonough 
Miss White 



Health 100. Personal Hygiene. Two hours. Women, first se- 
mester; men, second semester. 

Purpose: This course is designed to teach the student the value 
of correct living habits. 

Topics: Structure and care of the human body; desirable 
health practices; value of health examinations; the place of health 
in modern civilization; unscientific and irrational health proposals; 
disease prevention by immunization; disease control by isolation 
and quarantine, etc. 

Health 201. (Formerly Health 101.) Public Hygiene and 
Safety. Three hours. 

Purpose: To study the fundamental principles of public 
hygiene and disease prevention and applications of these principles 
in solving problems of home, school and community sanitation and 
public health. 

Topics: Micro-organisms in relation to sanitation, personal and 
public hygiene, food protection and preservation, the protection of 
the water and milk supply, immunization and control of communic- 
able diseases, home and school sanitation; social and economic 
aspects of health problems, health administration, function and 
authority of health officers, etc. 

Health 202. First Aid to the Injured. One hour. Fee, 50c. 

Purpose: To prepare the prospective teacher by demonstra- 
tion and practice to treat the emergencies which present them- 
selves in the schoolroom, on the playground, and on the athletic 
field. 

Topics: Bandaging, transportation of injured, artificial respira- 
tion, splinting, treatment of shock, injuries in home, wounds, and 
accident prevention. 

Health 231. Home Nursing. (Formerly Home Economics 231.) 
Two hours. 



138 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Prerequisite: Health 100 or 201, 

Purpose; To enable girls to administer first aid and to teach 
the home care of the sick. 

Topics: Duties of a home nurse; preparation and care of the 
room for a patient; study of pulse, respiration, etc.; bathing patients 
in bed; making of beds; simple home-made appliances for the com- 
fort of a patient; special treatment for particular and peculiar ill- 
nesses; serving of meals to patients; first aid treatments. 

Health 303. Applied Bacteriology. Five hours. 

Purpose: This is an introductory course in Bacteriology in 
which the student is taught the relationship between bacteria and 
human welfare. 

Topics: Stains and staining technique, sterilization, prepara- 
tion of culture media, isolation and identification of bacteria, effi- 
ciency of disinfectants and control of communicable diseases, and 
determination of the sanitary quality of milk and water. Some 
pathogens will be introduced for purposes of laboratory study, etc. 

Health 362. Individual Gymnastics. Two hours. Fee, 50c. 

Purpose: Adaptation of exercises to the individual needs of 
the student. 

Topics: Diagnosis and prescription of exercise for deformities 
of the human body; examination records and equipment; corrective 
exercises for individuals and groups. 

Health 365. Materials and Methods for Teaching Health Edu- 
cation. Two hours. 

Purpose: A presentation of the general principles which 
should govern the selection and organization of health materials. 
Methods for the teaching of health are discussed and observed. 

Topics: General objectives of the health program, health set- 
ups and practices, and materials suitable for primary and inter- 
mediate grades. 

Health 404. Microbiology of Foods. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Health 303. 

Purpose: To study control measures for micro-organisms 
responsible in food spoilage and food poisoning. 

Topics: Fermentation, food poisoning, food preservation, can- 
ning, pickling, and use of chemicals in food preservation. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mr. McDonough Mr. Hembree Mr. Rankin 

Miss Cherry Miss Hood Mr. Samuels 

Mr. Hughes 

Physical Education 110. Fundamental Physical Education 
Activities. One-half hour. Fee, 50c. 



CATALOG 1940-41 139 

Purpose: To teach skills and to develop in the individual and 
group a desirable attitude toward play in relation to the proper use 
of time. 

Section A. Fundamental Rhythms 

Section B. Combative Activities 

Section C. Swimming 

Section D. Recreational Games 

Section E. Advanced Rhythms 

Section F. Advanced Swimming 

Section G. Individual and Team Games 

Physical Education 125. (Formerly Physical Education 463.) 
Introduction to Physical Education. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course seeks to establish the place of physical 
education in general education and American life. It also takes into 
consideration comparative physical education. 

Topics: History, principles, scope, trends, methods of study, 
place in the field of general education; off activities from a profes- 
sional stand point; also to assist the student in understanding the 
field in which he is to work. 

Physical Education 220. Plays and Games for Elementary 
Grades, Two hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to acquaint the prospec- 
tive elementary teacher with plays and games suitable for the ele- 
mentary grades. 

Topics: This course deals with the physical education program 
of the elementary school. Among the subjects considered are the 
objectives of the physical education program, recreational activities, 
suitable plays and games, and other subjects related to the program 
of physical education. 

Physical Education 225. Games and Sports for the Secondary 
School. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to acquaint the secondary 
school teacher with activities suitable for junior and senior high 
school boys and girls. 

Topics: Place of physical education program in the secondary 
school; aim and objectives; individual and team sports; play ground 
and gymnasium procedures. 

Physical Education 245a and 245b. Modern Dance. Two hours. 

Purpose: To learn the principles of body movement and con- 
trol for modern dance; analyze its choreography, and to perform 
simple group compositions. 

Topics: Fundamental and basic rhythms, techniques, execu- 
tion of choreographic principles, and performance of modern com- 
positions. 

Physical Education 250. Scouting and Clubcraft. Two hours. 
(Men.) Fee, 50c. 



140 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Purpose: This course is intended for those interested in becom- 
ing scoutmasters. Club work is also taken into consideration. 

Topics: Study of specific community and recreational pro- 
grams; history and principles of scouting. Practical scoutcraft and 
clubcraft are emphasized; scoutmaster's certificate is awarded to 
each student completing the course. 

Physical Education 251. Clubcraft. Two hours. (Women.) 
Fee, 50c. 

Purpose: This course is offered so as to acquaint the teacher 
with a background of the theory and practice of club work and re- 
creation in general. 

Topics: Girl scouts, girl reserves, camping, fire and woodcraft 
organizations. 

Physical Education 260. Coaching Football and Basketball. 
Two hours. (Men.) (Football, first nine weeks; basketball, second 
nine weeks.) 

Purpose: A course offered to give players and prospective 
coaches a practical and theoretical background. 

Topics and Activities: General principles, systems, rules, and 
officiating equipment and schedules. 

Physical Education 265. Coaching Spring Sports. Two hours. 
(Men.) (Track and field, first nine weeks; baseball, second nine 
weeks.) 

Purpose: A course designed to give players and prospective 
coaches a practical and theoretical background. 

Topics and Activities: General principles, coaching hints, train- 
ing methods, organization of field days, equipment, and schedules. 

Physical Education 300. Folk and National Dancing. One hour. 
Fee, 50c. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with representative folk and 
national dances. 

Topics: American and English country dances, Morris and 
sword dances, and other national dances. 

Physical Education 320. Kinesiology. Two hours. 

Purpose: This course is designed to teach the student the 
fundamentals of body mechanics. 

Topics: Analysis of balance and movements of human body; 
application of physical laws and principles governing the mechanics 
of movement; actions of joints and muscles is studied in natural 
movements and organized activities. 

Physical Education 325. Physiology of Activity. Two hours. 

Purpose: A course for the study of the effects of physical edu- 
cation activities on the various systems of the human body. 

Topics: Growth and development; effects of bodily exercise on 
bodily functions; circulation and its adaptation to physical exertion; 
bodily temperature control; training; second wind, fatigue, and 
recovery in man. 



CATALOG 1940-41 141 

Physical Education 366. (Formerly Physical Education 266.) 
Materials and Methods for Teaching Physical Education. Two 
hours. 

Purpose: A course designed for the classroom teacher and for 
playground leaders. 

Topics: Theories of play, study of existing play programs, cor- 
relation with other subjects, achievement standards and tests, 
games, skills, lesson planning and observation, and a review of 
materials and activities suitable for the primary and intermediate 
grades. 

Physical Education 367. (Formerly Physical Education 267.) 
Physical Training Activities. Two hours. Fee, 50c. 

Purpose: It is designed for those contemplating leadership in 
physical education. 

Topics: Tactics, dancing, free exercise, hand apparatus, mimet- 
ics and games, and stunts. ^ 

Physical Education 368. (Formerly Physical Education 268.) 
Advanced Physical Training Activities. Two hours. Fee, 50c. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 367. 

Purpose: Continuation of Physical Education 367. 

Topics: Advanced tactics, drills for demonstration, natural 
exercises, pyramid building, games, opportunity for leadership and 
observation. 

Physical Education 401. Community Recreation. Two hours. 

Purpose: The study of what the schools and communities are 
doing and can do in meeting the leisure time needs of today and 
tomorrow. 

Topics: The problem of leisure; vacation time for children; 
adult recreation; content of school programs for leisure education; 
physical education, dramatics, reading, music, art and handcrafts, 
nature study, and extra-curricular activities. 

Physical Education 402. Recreation Leadership. Two hours. 

Purpose: The study of what the schools and communities are 
doing and can do in meeting the leisure time needs of today and 
tomorrow. 

Topics: Practice and observation of existing recreational facil- 
ities: playground, swimming pool, social centers, C.C.C. and N.Y.A. 
programs; introduction and contact with specialists in various 
recreational fields; governmental and semi-private agencies pro- 
moting recreation. 

Physical Education 468. (Formerly Physical Education 368.) 
Administration and Organization of Physical Education. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Physical Education 366, 367, 368. 

Purpose: This course is designed for minors and majors in 
health and physical education, and deals with mediums through 
which activity may be organized in junior and senior high schools. 



142 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: Intramurals, sport days, festivals, and cominunity play 
days; incentives; point systems; grading, awards, standards, etc.; 
tests and measurements; care of gymnasium and equipment; activi- 
ties suitable for junior and senior high school pupils. 



DIVISION OF LANGUAGES 

Mr. Clark Miss Buchanan Mr. Hager 

Mrs. Barnhill Mr. Keene Mrs. Murbach 

Mr. Grise Mr. Hounchell Miss Rush 

ENGLISH 

Mr. Clark Miss Buchanan Mr. Hounchell 

Mrs. Barnhill Mr. Grise Mr. Keene 

Mr. Hager 

English 101. Oral and Written Composition. Three hours. 

Purpose: To insure the learning and habitual practice of 
mechanical correctness of language in all ordinary speech and writ- 
ing situations, and to develop student ability of self-criticism in 
matters of such correctness. 

Topics: Recognition drills on parts of speech, inflected forms, 
phrases, clauses, the whole sentence; construction and syntax of 
chief inflected forms; sentence analysis; sentence construction; sen- 
tence variety; subordination; punctuation; dictionary study of accent 
and diacritical marks; spelling drills in most commonly misspelled 
words; paragraph writing; laboratory theme writing exercises; addi- 
tional drills on all common types of mechanical language errors; 
brief narrative and expository talks on subjects within personal 
observation and experiences. 

English 102. Oral and Written Composition. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: English 101. 

Purpose: To help the student in the matter of clear thinking 
and effective use of language. 

Topics: The evaluation of what we see and hear; accuracy of 
observation and statement; the clarifying of our thoughts and im- 
pressions; the selection and use of materials; the planning and con- 
struction of many oral and written themes. 

English 163. Fundamentals of Speech. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: English 101. 

Purpose: To enable teachers to acquire for themselves attrac- 
tive voices and pleasing speech habits for reading and speaking, 
and to equip them for developing these qualities in their pupils. 

Topics: Corrective drill work for posture and movement; the 
applied science of voice production; characteristics of a pleasing 
voice; individual diagnosis of voice qualities; tone-placing; enuncia- 
tion; pronunciation; pitch, stress, and volume. The course affords 
much practice in individual speaking and reading under careful, 
constructive criticism. 



144 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

English 201. Journalism. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Purpose: To teach the student how to read and judge a news- 
paper; to familiarize him with the best current newspapers, their 
policies, and their methods; to give instruction in the kinds and 
methods of journalistic writing and practice in writing; to show him 
how to make up a paper, write headlines, and prepare manuscript; 
to give some training in managing and advising school publications; 
to edit a paper. 

Topics: Comparison of many newspapers as to amount and 
kind of news, make-up, size, type, headlines, advertising, tone, etc.; 
kinds and methods of journalistic writing and practice in each; 
headlines; make-up; copy; proofreading; organization of staff. 

English 210. Books. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English. 

Purpose: To provide opportunity for students to participate in 
a credit-giving course in "free" or "recreational" reading under 
conditions as stimulating and helpful as the group and the instruc- 
tor together can make them. 

Topics: Some standards for evaluating books; some attention 
to reading lists; preparation of a special list for the class; some 
consideration of how to read a book; how to make a written criti- 
cism Oi a beck; free handling of many books from the list com- 
piled for the course; the reading of a number of books of the 
student's own choice; thoughtful criticism of a number of these 
books; oral reports and informal class discussions; personal con- 
ferences; no tests or examination. 

English 216. (Formerly English 316.) The Short Story. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and one course in literature. 

Purpose: To compare many types of stories and methods of 
construction, to present the development of the short story, to 
acquaint the student with the best stories of the world Eind the best 
writers of stories, to set up some criteria for judging a short story. 

Topics: The technique of the short story, the development of the 
short story as a literary type, romanticism and realism in stories, 
the short story in America, short stories for the high school, the 
writing of a story or of a paper. 

English 218. Survey of Literature I. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Purpose: To bring within student experience the content of 
selected world literature from ancient times to the end of the Ren- 
aissance, considered against the background of the life, tradition 
and history of the various peoples and periods presented; to trace 
the development of the chief types of literature; to give some guidance 
in literary appreciation and in the selecting of suitable material from 
this field for the upper grades and high school. 



CATALOG 1940-41 145 

Topics: Oriental literature, Hebrew religious literature, the 
popular epic and the literary epic, classical drama, Teutonic myth 
and saga, medieval legend and romance, rise of religious drama, 
Italy and the Rennaissance, rise of lyrical poetry, history and 
biography, philosophical writings, Renaissance drama in England; 
satiric narrative prose. 

English 219. Survey of Literature IL Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 218. 

Purpose: To continue the method of study as outlined in 
English 218, to apply this method to the major movements and 
trends in the literature of Western Europe and America in the 
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

Topics: The New Classicism; the Romantic Movement in 
France, Germany, England, and America; the great Victorians; the 
rise of realism in France and Russia; its extension in England and 
America; Ibsen and the modern drama. 

English 231. Public Speaking. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Purpose: To train students for effective participation in the 
normal speaking situations. 

Topics: Physiological basis of voice and corrective voice drills; 
source and organization of speech materials; objectives and 
audience considerations; practice in preparation and delivery of 
speeches for various occasions, purposes and audiences; speech 
criticism; parliamentary procedure with participation drills. 

English 260. Literature for Children. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give the prospective 
elementary teacher an opportunity to make a systematic study of 
children's literature and to know and appreciate the best in this 
particular field. 

Topics: The course includes a brief survey of the history of 
children's literature and a study of the literature itself under the 
following topics: Mother Goose, Fairy Tales, Folklore and Fables, 
Realistic and Fanciful stories, myths, epics and sagas, the romance 
cycles, poetry, fiction, biography, historical and geographical 
literature. Methods of teaching literature in the elementary 
grades are incidentally touched upon. 

English 264. Story Telling. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: English 260. 

Purpose: To acquaint the teacher with the materials for 
story telling, and with the techniques to be used in different grades 
and with different audiences. 

Topics: History of story telling; purpose and aim of story tell- 
ing; the story interests of childhood; preparing the story; telling the 
story; condensing and expanding the story; dramatizing the story; 



146 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

uses of the story in schoolroom subjects; technique suitable to vari- 
ous ages and types of children; technique required for adults. 
A considerable stock of stories of a wide range of appeal is 
mastered. Much practice is given the actual telling of stories to 
children. Constructive analysis of each student's performance is 
afforded. 

English 265. (Formerly English 165.) Grammar for Teachers. 
Two hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Purpose: To review the principles of English grammar and 
acquaint the teacher with some of the problems connected with the 
teaching of grammar. 

Topics: In the course are studied the parts of speech, syntax 
and sentence analysis. The history of the teaching of grammar, 
and methods of testing and measuring progress are also touched 
upon. 

English 301. Advanced Composition. Three hours. Required 
of juniors and seniors who have less than six hours of freshman 
English. 

Purpose: To give the teacher practice in collecting, organizing, 
and presenting material in an effective written form; to encourage 
creative writing. 

Topics: Practice is given in writing reports, recommenda- 
tions, research papers, familiar essays, short stories, feature articles, 
or other forms of journalistic writing. Students are urged to write 
with a view to submitting their articles to suitable periodicals for 
publication. Some attention is given to the materals for high school 
composition. 

English 305. (Formerly English 205.) Argumentation. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Purpose: To teach how to recognize, build, and present sound 
argument; to show the relation of persuasion to argument. 

Topics: This course takes up analysis, evidence and proof, 
kinds of argument; fallacies, brief -drawing, platform technique, 
reports on lectures, political speeches, etc.; and the writing of a 
forensic. 

English 311. Shakespeare. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in litera- 
ture. 

Purpose: To give the student a knowledge of the technique and 
content of Shakespeare's dramas, and a knowledge of Shakespeare's 
English and of his contemporaries, to consider certain of his 
dramas with reference to their place in high school English. 

Topics: The course includes an extensive reading of Shake- 
speare's dramas and an intensive study of the technique, sources, 
and content of a few; a discussion of the Elizabethan theatre, the 



CATALOG 1940-41 147 

Elizabethan people, Elizabethan dramatics, movements, and events 
which influenced Elizabethan thought; the development of drama 
to the death of Shakespeare; elements of appeal to high school 
pupils. 

English 312. (Formerly English 412.) Modern Drama. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in litera- 
ture. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with modern tendencies in 
drama; to give him a knowledge of movements and influences 
which have combined to make our drama what it is today; to 
familiarize him with the best modern drama and dramatists of all 
countries; to help him establish some criteria for judging drama. . 

English 314. The Novel. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and at least one course in 
literature. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with some of the choicest 
fiction of England and America, to interest him in that of other 
countries, and to raise the level of his taste in novels. 

Topics: The development of the novel in England and 
America; the distinction between the romance and the psycholog- 
ical novel, and the place of each in our reading; some character- 
istics of harmful and worthless fiction; some tendencies of present- 
day novelists. 

English 315. (Formerly English 215.) Nineteenth Century 
Essayists. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and at least one course in 
literature. 

Purpose: To familiarize the teacher with the work of the great 
essayists of the nineteenth century, and to show how varied was 
the thought for which the essay was the vehicle of expression. 

Topics: This course includes a study of representative essays 
of the leading English and American essayists of the nineteenth 
century, with attention on the types of essays, and the literary, 
social, political, and religious or moral ideals set forth in the 
essays; an analysis of the prose style of some of the essayists; 
oral and written reports. 

English 317. (Formerly English 217.) Contemporary Litera- 
ture. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and at least one course in 
literature. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student 
with the literary tendencies of the last decade and to foster a dis- 
criminating attitude toward current literature. 

Topics: New names, new influences, and new trends, and the 
relation of these to former periods in the development of litera- 
ture; the relative importance of old and new books; the proper 
emphasis upon literature of escape and that of self-realization; the 



148 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

evaluation of current literature; advantages and limitations of 
book-review and commercial organizations designed to assist in 
the selection of new books; the place of newspapers and magazines 
in our reading during leisure hours. The reading for this course 
is extensive rather than intensive and is not confined to the litera- 
ture of any one type nor of any one nation. 

English 318. (Formerly English 213.) American Literature. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in literature. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with American life and 
thought as reflected in the best representative American writers, con- 
sidered in relation to environmental influences and prevailing 
literary tendencies from pioneer to recent times; to develop some 
degree of literary discrimination; to help students select suitable 
material from this field for the upper grades and high school. 

Topics: The pioneer spirit in religious, historical and journal- 
istic writings; literature of the Revolution; statesmanship of the 
new nation; nineteenth century Romanticism; Transcendentalism; 
disunion and reunion; growth of a realistic spirit; literature of 
local color; contemporary literature of realism and revolt; such 
readings in literary history and biography as may be helpful in an 
understanding of the literature studies, values and elements of 
appeal for the upper grades and high school. 

English 321. Romantic and Victorian Poets. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in literature. 

Purpose: To trace the development and culmination of the 
Romantic Movement and present the various elements that compose 
it; to familiarize the student with the main characteristics of Vic- 
torianism as revealed in its leading poets; to help the student inter- 
pret the spirit of these periods through their poetry. 

Topics: The rise of Romanticism; Wordsworth and Coleridge; 
Scott and Southey and Byron; Shelley and Keats; social, religious, 
industrial and intellectual unrest; the Oxford Movement; the Pre- 
Raphaelite Brotherhood; Tennyson; the Brownings; Arnold and 
religious unrest; Swinburne, Morris, and the Rossettis. 

English 363. Dramatic Presentation I. Two hours. 

Purpose: To develop an appreciation of and some skill in 
creative dramatics. 

Topics: The art and technique of acting; the relation of the 
individual to the role, to the play, and to the director; the value 
of creative dramatics to the individual and to the group. 

English 364. Dramatic Presentation II. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: English 363. 

Purpose: To prepare the student to produce plays in school 
and community organizations. 

Topics: Selecting the play; casting and rehearsing; theory and 
construction of stage scenery; theory and practice of stage light- 
ing; costuming and make-up; organization of production stafif. 



CATALOG 1940-41 149 

English 365. Teaching of High School English. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: English 218 and 219 or the equivalent. Open 
to English majors and minors only 

Purpose: To acquaint the prospective English teacher with the 
objectives, materials, methods, and problems of high school Eng- 
lish; to give a functional aspect to the topics studied by observing 
good teaching. 

Topics: Objectives of high school English; critical analysis and 
selection of materials; review and application of educational prin- 
ciples and psychology of learning to the studying and teaching of 
high school English; different methods and techniques of teach- 
ing the various phases of high school English — speech, written com- 
position, grammar, and literature; the studying of teaching by 
observing good teaching; interrelationship of English to other 
high school subjects and activities. 

English 421. Renaissance and Elizabethan Literature. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in literature. 

Purpose: To give the student a fuller understanding of the 
Renaissance movement and of its manifestations in English litera- 
ture and life, to acquaint him with a large number of writers of 
the early Renaissance and Elizabethan ages, and to familiarize him 
with as many as possible of the most important writers and 
writings. 

Topics: The spirit of the Renaissance; the influence of Italian 
and other continental literatures; the early English humanists; 
Elizabethan enthusiasm; Elizabethan language; new literary in- 
fluences; chief literary forms; Spencer, Sidney, Bacon, Marlowe, 
Shakespeare, Ben Jonson; other dramatists and lyrists. 

English 423. (Formerly English 323.) Milton and the Puritan 
Period. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in literature. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the poetic genius, phi- 
losophy, and ideals of Milton; to present the whole body of his 
poetry; to present the Puritan Age as a whole. 

Topics: The course includes a study of the life of Milton as it 
affected his writing; his earlier poetry; the development of his 
genius; the great epic Paradise Lost and its interpretation; Para- 
dise Regained and Samson Agonistes; other writers of the period. 

English 424. (Formerly English 324.) Chaucer and Medieval 
Story, Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in literature. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the rich field of narra- 
tive literature of the Middle Ages, and to show how much of this 
literature is illustrated in the poetry of Chaucer. 

Topics: The course consists chiefly of a study of the various 
types of medieval story — the folk-epic, the beast tale, the metrical 



150 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

romance, the fabliau, the saint's legend, and the ballad; and of 
the social and moral ideals which they reveal. 

English 425. The Age of Classicism. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Freshman English and two courses in literature. 

Purpose: To trace the development of the classic spirit in Eng- 
lish literature from 1660 to 1784; to study classicism as a literary 
force; to acquaint the student with the leading expressions of 
English classicism; to interpret the life and spirit of the period 
through these writings. 

Topics: Social backgrounds of classicism; Restoration drama 
as a reaction against Puritanism; Dry den and the rise of the critical 
spirit; French and Graeco-Roman influences; the literary dictator- 
ship of Dr. Johnson; the decay of literary patronage; new tenden- 
cies in Thompson, Cowper, Gray, Chatterton, Goldsmith, and 
Crabbe. 

English 435. (Formerly English 335.) Interpretative Reading 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Nine hours of English, including English 163 or 
its equivalent. 

Purpose: To enable teachers to interpret literature in class- 
room and platform reading, and to prepare them to train their 
pupils in interpretative reading. 

Topics: Types of interpretation; gesture; pantomime; resonance; 
flexibility range; study of enunciation and pronunciation con- 
tinued; sources of materials; criteria for selecting readings, for 
preparing contestants and readers, and for judging contests. Much 
individual work under careful direction is afforded. 

English 441. (Formerly English 341.) History of the English 
Language. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Two years of work in English toward a major 
or first minor in English. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the way the English 
language developed. 

Topics: The family of languages; the Old English period; the 
Middle English period; modern English; the foreign and native 
elements in English; history of English vowel sounds; mutation 
and gradation; the consonants; English inflections; English accent; 
collateral readings in the less technical works on the English 
language. 

English 461. (Formerly English 361.) Kentucky Literature. 
Two hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101, 102, one survey course. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the literature produced 
by Kentucky writers; to relate this literature to American litera- 
ture in general. 

Topics: The economic, political, social, and religious back- 
ground of the early Kentuckians as expressed in their writings; 



CATALOG 1940-41 151 

ante bellum literature, the influence of the War between the States; 
the rise of the local color fiction group; the revival of poetry; 
present-day writers and tendencies; ballads; seventeenth century 
survivals in the native idiom. 

An opportunity will be offered to familiarize the student with 
the John Wilson Townsend Collection. 

FRENCH 

Mrs. Murbach 

French 101. (Formerly French 151.) Elementary French. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: To begin the study of the structure of one of the 
great living languages and to arouse interest in French literature 
by the early reading of excerpts from the French classics. 

Topics: Phonetics, pronunciation, vocabulary, parts of speech, 
sentence structure, conversation in French on material studied in 
a reader. 

French 102. (Formerly French 152.) Elementary French. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: French 101 or one unit of high school French. 

Purpose: To continue the study begun in French 101. 

Topics: Continuation of the study of grammar begun in 
French 101, two hundred pages of reading material serving as basis 
for oral work. 

French 201. (Formerly French 251.) Intermediate French. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: French 101 and 102 or two units of high school 
French. 

Purpose: To increase skill in translating and writing French 
and in comprehending and using the spoken French. 

Topics: Grammar review, short history of French literature, 
and translation of news items in a French newspaper. 

French 202. (Formerly French 252.) Intermediate French. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: French 201 or three units of high school French. 

Purpose: To continue the study begun in French 201. 

Topics: Grammar review, French newspaper, and the French 
classics. 

French 301. (Formerly French 254.) French Prose Classics. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Two years of college French or the equivalent. 

Purpose: To develop power to read French rapidly, to increase 
facility in the use of spoken French, and to add to the student's 
knowledge of French literature. 



152 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: "Intensive" reading of a number of French prose 
classics with emphasis on the language structure, and "extensive" 

reading of works by representative prose writers from the Middle 
Ages to the nineteenth century. 

French 302. (Formerly French 255.) French Prose Classics. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: French 301 or its equivalent. 
Purpose: To continue the study begun in French 301. 
Topics: Study of selected prose works of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. 

French 401. French Drama and Poetry. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Two years of college French or its equivalent. 

Purpose: To follow the rich stream of French drama and 
poetry from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century, and to 
develop the student's capacity to express his opinions in French on 
the works which he is studying. 

Topics: The medieval period, the Renaissance, the Golden 
Age, the critical eighteenth century. 

French 402. French Drama and Poetry. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: French 401, or its equivalent. 
Purpose: To continue the study begun in French 401. 
Topics: Romanticism, realism, the Parnassus school, symbol- 
ism, and contemporary tendencies in poetry and drama. 

French 403. (Formerly French 350.) French Seminar. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Eighteen hours college French. 

Purpose: This course is designed to round out as much as 
possible the major work in French, giving a view of the subject as 
a whole, supplementing at points which have, of necessity, been neg- 
lected and discussing problems for study in the future as the 
student goes into the teaching field or the graduate school. 

Topics: (a) Review of the great schools of prose, drama and 
poetry; (b) wide readings in contemporary literature; (c) conversa- 
tion in the salon manner on problems of interest to the language 
student. 

French 404. Advanced French Grammar and Composition. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: The aim of this course is to review the techniques of 
French composition, and to encourage independent writing on the 
part of the student. 

Topics: (a) Review of phonetics and grammar, (b) composi- 
tions on assigned subjects in French literature. 



CATALOG 1940-41 153 

LATIN 

Miss Rush 

Latin 115. Elementary Latin. Three hours. 

Not open to students who presented Latin for college entrance. 

Purpose: This course is organized to meet the need of those 
students who have had no Latin in high school and wish to begin 
the study of it in college that they may acquaint themselves with 
the mechanics of Latin to: (a) satisfy the language requirement 
for (1) a degree, (2) a major in English, (3) a major in Foreign 
Language; (b) satisfy premedical or other pre-professional require- 
ments; (c) begin a study of the language for its general cultural 
value. 

Topics: (a) Pronunciation; declension of nouns, adjectives 
and pronouns; indicatives and infinitives of all conjugations with 
the simple uses of the subjunctive; (b) acquisition of the funda- 
mental principles of the language and the ability to read simple 
Latin prose dealing with Roman home life, mythology and Roman 
history. 

Latin 116. Intermediate Latin. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: One unit of high school Latin or Latin 115. 

Purpose: This course is a continuation of Latin 115. 

Topics: (a) Selections read in Latin are from Caesar and a 
wide range of authors of equal difficulties, with a continued 
emphasis on mastery of vocabulary, inflection, syntax, and their 
application to English; (b) collateral reading on Roman history and 
society; (c) training in the understanding of Latin in the Latin 
order. 

Latin 205. Vergil's Aeneid. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Open to students presenting two or three units 
of Latin for entrance or to those who have completed Latin 115 and 
116. 

Purpose: (a) To introduce the student to Latin poetry; (b) to 
give continued practice in the reading and translation of Latin; (c) 
to develop an appreciation for Vergil's place in Latin literature; the 
Aeneid, its story, its dramatic setting and background; its influence 
on later, and especially, Englsh literature; its historical and mytho- 
logical references. 

Topics: (a) Selections from the twelve bool^s of the Aeneid of 
Vergil; (b) selections from other works of Vergil for comparative 
study; (c) study of Augustan age; (d) study of metrical form and 
structure of the poem, scansion and reading of dactylic hexameter; 
(e) study of some of allusions in English literature to Vergil's 
Aeneid; along with this worl?;, there is a thorough grounding of the 
student in the inflections and constructions of Latin. 



154 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Latin 301. (Formerly Latin 104.) Selections from Livy. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Three units of high school Latin or the 
equivalent. 

Purpose: (a) To develop the power of rapid translation for 
information; (b) to gain first hand acquaintance with the source 
books of Roman history; (c) to acquire correct pronunciation and 
habit of reading the original Latin text. 

Topics: (a) Survey of Roman history from foundation of 
Rome to close of second Punic War as related to Livy's History 
Books, I, XXI, and XXII; (b) assigned readings from such 
historians as Mommfsen, Heitland and others; (c) cursory examina- 
tion of Livy's source material; (d) comparative study of Rome and 
Carthage; (e) critical study of Livy's style. 

Latin 302. (Formerly Latin 108.) Selections from Horace. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Three units of high school Latin, or the 
equivalent. 

Purpose: (a) To afford the student a comparative view of 
the Augustan Age, the most brilliant period of Latin literature; 
(b) to develop appreciation for the metrical perfection of Horace 
and his contemporaries; (c) to emphasize as in Latin 301 the value 
of reading from the Latin text, both for metrical values and pro- 
nunciation habits. 

Topics: (a) Selected Odes, Epodes and Satires of Horace; 
(b) selections from Catullus for comparative study; (c) study of 
Augustan Age, both from a literary point of view and political; 
(d) study of Horace's personality, point of view and philosophy of 
life; (e) comparison between the Rome of Horace and the city of 
today; (f) study of various metres employed by Horace, with 
special attention to the Greek examples; (g) study of translation 
for poetic appreciation, with study of English translation of 
Horace's poems. 

Latin 303, The Writing of Latin Prose. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Latin 301 or the equivalent. 

Purpose: (a) To afford a review of the principles of grammar 
and syntax; (b) to provide for formation of proper habits of sight 
reading; (c) the writing of simple Latin prose. 

Topics: Selections from the text, "Arnold's Latin Prose". 
One hour each week is devoted to review of principles of syntax 
and sight reading and two hours a week to the writing of Latin 
prose. (Required of all Latin majors.) 

Latin 304. The Latin Dramatists. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Latin 302, or its equivalent. 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint students with the drama of the 
Romans, (b) to study the source of Latin comedy and influence on 



CATALOG 1940-41 155 

both Latin and modern literature, (c) to develop the power to read 
Latin. 

Topics: Dramas of Plautus, Terence and Seneca. Two plays 
of Plautus will be studied intensively followed by rapid reading of 
other representative comedies. One of the tragedies of Seneca will 
be read. 

Latin 401. (Formerly Latin 201.) Latin Prose of the Silver 
Age. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Latin 304, or the equivalent. 

Purpose: (a) A continuation of study of Latin literature; (b) 
translation for information; (c) to supply the student first hand 
information of this age of Roman life and letters. 

Topics: (a) Letters of Pliny the Younger; (b) Tacitus' 
Agricola; (c) selected readings from other representative writers. 

Latin 402. (Formerly Latin 202.) Satire and Epigram. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Latin 304 or the equivalent. 

Purpose: (a) To develop power to read Latin for content; 
(b) to develop literary appreciation; (c) to show the student 
Roman society of the first century, A. D., through contemporary 
eyes. 

Topics: (a) Selected Satires of Juvenal; (b) selected epigrams 
of Martial; (c) study of development of Satire in Latin literature 
with assignments from Horace; (d) study of satire in English; (e) 
study of epigram as a literary expression. 

Latin 403. (Formerly Latin 203.) Latin Literature of the 
Early Empire. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Latin 304, or the equivalent. 

Purpose: To introduce student into the literature of this, the 
most brillant period of Latin literature. 

Topics: The Oxford University Press text — selections com- 
piled by A. C. B. Brown. The selections form a connected and 
contemporaneous discussion of the following subjects: Politics, 
education, literature, philosophy, social types, and town and 
country life. 

Latin 404. Literature of the Late Republic. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Latin 304 or its equivalent. 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint the student with the literature of 
the Ciceronian age, (b) to give an intimate knowledge, through the 
literature of the time, of the turbulent political and social life of 
this ill-adjusted period, (c) to give practice in translation for 
information. 

Topics: Prose — Selections from the works of Caesar, Sallust, 
Nepos, and Cicero with the emphasis on Ciceronian prose as a basis 
of much of the thinking and writing since his day. Poetry — Selec- 
tions from works of poets of this age with emphasis on the works of 
Catullus and Lucretius. 



156 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Latin 405. Roman Private Life. Three hours. 

Required of Latin majors. 

Purpose: To give a knowledge of the life of the Romans in the 
later Republic and earlier Empire that will serve as a background 
for teaching of high school Latin and help explain the powerful 
influence which the Roman nation exerted over the old world and 
make it easier to understand why that influence is felt today. 

Topics: Lectures, discussions and readings on Roman family, 
home, marriage, education, clothing, food, amusements, travel, 
religion, town and country life. 

SPANISH 

Mrs. Murbach 

Spanish 101. Elementary Spanish. Three hours. 

Purpose: To introduce the student to one of the great modern 
languages. 

Topics: Graminar, pronunciation, reading of easy Spanish. 

Spanish 102. Elementary Spanish. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or one unit of high school Spanish. 
Purpose: To continue the study begun in Spanish 101. 
Topics: Continuation of the study begun in Spanish 101. 

Spanish 201. Intermediate Spanish. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Spanish 101 and 102 or two units of high school 
Spanish. 

Purpose: To widen the student's knowledge of and interest in 
the Spanish language and the countries where this language is 
used. 

Topics: Review of grammar; reading of several Spanish 
classics with increased emphasis on the spoken Spanish. 

Spanish 202. Intermediate Spanish. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or three units of high school Spanish. 
Purpose: To continue the study begun in Spanish 201, 
Topics: Continued study of grammar; increased amounts of 
intensive and extensive reading; wide use of oral Spanish. 



DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS 

Mr. Park Mr. Engle Mr. Jenkins 

Mathematics 107. College Algebra. Three hours. 

Purpose: To give thorough and comprehensive instruction in 
the principles of college algebra. 

Topics: Review of high schools algebra, radicals, quadratics, 
functions and their graphs, advanced topics in quadratic equations, 
ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, and systems of equa- 
tions involving quadratics. 

Mathematics 108. (Formerly Mathematics 207.) College 
Algebra. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 107. 

Purpose: To give instruction in the advanced topics of college 
algebra. 

Topics: This course includes a study of mathematical induc- 
tion, binomial theorem, theory of equations, permutations and 
combinations, probability, determinants and partial fractions. 

Mathematics 113. (Formerly Mathematics 213.) Trigonometry. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 107. 

Purpose: To give instruction in the fundamentals of plane 
trigonometry. 

Topics: Functions of acute angles, natural functions, 
logarithms, solutions of right and oblique triangles, development 
of formulas, functions in the unit circle. 

Mathematics 231. Solid Geometry. Three hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the fundamental theo- 
retical and practical aspects of solid geometry. 

Topics: The course deals with the fundamental propositions, 
problems, and exercises of solid geometry. 

Mathematics 232. Analytic Geometry. Five hours. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 107 and 113 

Purpose: To give instruction in the principles and applications 
of analytic geometry. 

Topics: This course deals with problems, formulas and exer- 
cises relating to straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, and hyper- 
bola. Attention is also given to polar co-ordinates. 

Mathematics 251. (Formerly Mathematics 351.) Differential 
Calculus. Five hours. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 107, 113 and 232. 

Purpose: To teach the fundamental principles, problems and 
practical applications of differential calculus. 



158 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: Theory of limits, differentiation, simple application of 
the derivative, maxima and minima, differentials, partial differ- 
entiation and series. 

Mathematics 260. Teachers' Arithmetic. Three hours. 

Purpose: The aim of this course is to give the student a wide 
knowledge of the objectives, problems, and methods of teaching 
arithmetic in the elementary school. 

Topics: Aims and objectives of arithmetic, value of problems, 
assignments, examinations, importance of accuracy and speed, value 
of drill, games, solution of problems and methods of teaching 
arithmetic. 

Mathematics 321. (Formerly Mathematics 221.) General 
Astronomy. Three hours. 

Purpose: To give the student a knowledge and appreciation of 
the history, principles, importance and content of astronomy. 

Topics: This course includes a study of the development of 
astronomy as a science, the development of the solor system, 
astronomical instruments, and the better known facts of astronomy. 

Mathematics 342. (Formerly Mathematics 341.) Elementary 
Statistical Methods. Two hours. 

Purposes: (a) To acquaint the student with the theory and 
application of statistical methods to actual problems, and (b) to 
familiarize the student with the use of the graphical methods. 

Topics: This course includes a study of the methods of col- 
lecting data, methods of tabulation of data, uses and purposes of 
statistical methods, central tendencies, deviations, correlations, and 
graphic methods. 

Mathematics 352. Integral Calculus. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 251. 

Purpose: To teach the foundation principles, problems and 
applications of integral calculus 

Content: This course includes a study of integrations, definite 
integrals, integration of rational fractions, reduction formulas and 
successive integration. 

Mathematics 407. (Formerly Mathematics 307.) Theory of 
Equations. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 107, 108, 113, 251 or enrollment 
in 251. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with theory of algebra 
equations. 

Topics: This course includes a study of graphs, complex num- 
bers, cubic equations, quartic equations, determinants, and sym- 
metric functions. 

Mathematics 432. College Geometry. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 232. 

Purpose: To give an extension of high school geometry. 

Topics: Geometric constructions, properties of the triangle, 
transversals, and harmonic properties of circles. 



CATALOG 1940-41 159 

Mathematics 442. Mathematical Statistics. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 352. 

Purpose. To present the mathematical rudiments of elementary 
statistics. 

Topics: Graphs, moments, cumulative frequency, the normal 
law, correlation, probability and frequency curves. 

Mathematics 453. (Formerly Mathematics 353.) Differential 
Equations. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 352. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the methods of solving 
the most common types of differential equations. 

Topics: The types studied are those of the first and second 
order, systems of simultaneous equations, and partial differential 
equations. 

Mathematics 454. (Formerly Mathematics 554.) Advanced 
Calculus. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 352. 

Purpose: To fulfill the need of a more extensive course than 
that given in elementary calculus. 

Topics: This course covers indeterminate forms, power series, 
partial differentiation, implicit functions and applications to 
geometry. 

Mathematics 467. (Formerly Mathematics 367.) Teaching of 
High School Mathematics, Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of college mathematics or consent of 
Head of the Department. 

Purposes: (a) To give instruction in the aims and importance 
of high school mathematics; (b) to give the student a knowledge 
of the development of mathematics and its place in the secondary 
school; (c) to give instruction in the best methods of teaching high 
school mathematics. 

Topics: Aims of high school mathematics; importance of high 
school mathematics; history of mathematics; problems of teaching 
applied to mathematics; methods of teaching algebra, plane and 
solid geometry, trigonometry, and high school arithmetic; selection 
of problems; types of examinations and their importance; class 
instruction as applied to mathematics; importance of assignment 
and methods of study. 

Mathematics 468. The History of Mathematics. Two hours. 

Purpose: To present a general view of the development of the 
elementary branches of mathematics and a brief survey of the 
growth of higher mathematics from the eighteenth century to the 
present time. 

Topics: The development of mathematical symbolism, the 
development of mathematical concepts, the contributions of mathe- 
matics to the development of civilization. 



160 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Mathematics 469. Problems in the Teaching of Mathematics 
Two hours. 

Purpose: To present specific problems which confront the 
teacher of secondary mathematics. 

Topics: The course of study, organization of materials, methods 
of teaching various topics of algebra and geometry, the selection 
of textbooks, the construction and selection of tests. 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Mr. Kennamer Mr. Dorris Miss McKinney 

Mr. Adams Miss Floyd Mr. Moore 

Mr. Burns Mr. Keith Mr. Allen 

ECONOMICS 

Mr. Moore 

Economics 124. Economic History of Europe. Three hours. 

Purpose: To familiarize the student with the history of the 
economic activities of the leading nations of Europe. Emphasis is 
placed upon modern times, but the ancient and the medieval 
periods are not neglected. 

Topics: The history of the development of agriculture, com- 
merce, transportation, industry, labor legislation, socialism, social 
insurance, population and population trends, and finance in the 
principal European nations. 

Economics 230. (Formerly Economics 125.) Principles of Eco- 
nomics. Three hours. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the principles of eco- 
nomic theory and to give him an understanding of some of the 
outstanding industries of the United States. 

Topics: The nature and function of industry, the science of 
economics, wealth, capital, income, specialization, exchange, agents 
of production, risk, price levels, business cycles, international 
trade, value, and important industries of the United States. 

Economics 231. (Formerly Economics 222.) Principles of 
Applied Economics. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Economics 230. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the principles of eco- 
nomic theory, to introduce the student to some of the elementary 
problems of applied economics, and to familiarize him with some 
of the outstanding industries of the United States. 

Topics: Economic science and its application, consumption and 
the guidance of industry, wastes in production, unemployment and 
other forms of idle power, the integration of industry, efficiency in 
management, industrial unrest and conflict, industrial peace, profit- 
sharing and joint control in industry, problems of population, effi- 
ciency in marketing, the price system and its control, regulation 
of public utility rates, control of banking in the United States, 
stabilizing our monetary system, business cycles and their control, 
free trade and protection, international debts and economic im- 
perialism, the relation between government and industry, govern- 
ment regulation and ownership, financing the government, the 

E. S. T. C— 6 



162 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

revenue system of the United States, the problem of inequality, 
agricultural problems, types of economic organization, and im- 
portant industries of the United States. 

Economics 310. (Formerly Economics 210 and 321.) American 
Economic History. Two hours. 

Purpose: To give the student an understanding of the eco- 
nomic development of the United States. 

Topics: Historical development of commerce, industry, trans- 
portation, banking, labor problems, business organization, mone- 
tary problems and agriculture in the United States. 

Economics 324. (Formerly Economics 224.) Money and Bank- 
ing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Economics 230. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the elementary prin- 
ciples and theory of money, and with the theories and practices of 
banking. 

Topics: Nature and functions of money, kinds of money, mone- 
tary systems, history of banking, functions of the bank, bank ad- 
ministration, the national banking system, deposits and depositors, 
the clearing house, domestic and foreign exchange, loans and dis- 
counts, bank supervision, savings banks, trust companies, foreign 
banking systems, and the federal reserve system. 

Economics 430. (Formerly Economics 330.) Public Finance. 
Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 230. 

Purpose: To give the student an understanding and apprecia- 
tion of the scope and importance of public finance in the opera- 
tion of modern governments. 

Topics: The meaning and scope of public finance; develop- 
ment of public finance; public expenditures, their classification, 
growth, and economic effects; public credit, its nature and uses, its 
forms; financial administration and legislation; the forms of public 
revenue, the public domain, the industrial domain, administrative 
revenues, ete. 

Economics 431. Taxation. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Economics 230 and Economics 430. 

Purpose: To give the student an understanding and appreciation 
of the principles of taxation in the American local, state and 
national governments. 

Topics: Meaning and development of taxation; some practical 
requisites of sound taxation; the distribution of the tax burden; 
means of escape from taxation; tax systems and tax administration; 
taxes on persons; development and characteristics of poll and income 
taxes; problems of personal taxation; property taxation; character- 
istics and problems of property taxation; commodity taxes; taxes on 
acts and privileges; the taxation of business; sales and other taxes 
on acts and privileges; inheritance and estate taxes; and some effects 
of taxation. 



CATALOG 1940-41 163 

GEOGRAPHY 

Mr. Kennamer Miss McKinney 

Geography 101. Principles of Geography. Three hours. Fee, 
50c. 

Purposes: (a) To acquaint the student with the tools neces- 
sary in geography work, (b) to help the student acquire a geo- 
graphic vocabulary, (c) to give the student a working knowledge of 
the basic principles underlying the science of geography. 

Topics; The use of maps, globes, tellurians and atlases; the 
use and interpretation of charts, diagrams and statistics; a brief 
history of the changing aspects of geography; the nature of human 
geography; the earth's form and movements, their results and 
influences upon man; the continents and their influences upon 
man; human activities in mountains and plains; the influence of the 
oceans on man; the use of inland waters, man's relation to soil and 
minerals; man and vegetation in different types of climatic regions; 
the effects of population density upon standards of living; distribu- 
tion of the population of the earth. 

Geography 202. Climatology. Three hours. 

Purpose: This course is planned (a) to provide an interpreta- 
tion of weather conditions and processes, (b) to interpret climatic 
data and charts, (c) to note the various climatic elements — their 
distribution and their variations, (d) to study the common climatic 
types of the world on a regional basis, and (e) to emphasize the 
human responses to weather and climate. 

Topics: Weather and weather observation; elements of climate; 
climatic regions of the world — a study of climate as affected by the 
physical factors of sun, mountains, land and water; changes in 
temperature, pressure, winds — direction and force; humidity; cloud 
phenomena, precipitation, and the major types of storms; fore- 
castings; the climatic regions of the world; weather conditions and 
their relation to human activities. 

Geography 221. (Formerly Geography 121.) Economic 
Geography of the Industries. Three hours. 

Purpose: (a) To give the student a view of the business field, 
(b) to acquaint the student with the major industries of the world 
and the principal factors influencing domestic and international 
trade, (c) to give the student a background for study in inter- 
national relations and world problems. 

Topics: The more important agricultural products — cereals, 
starch foods, forage crops, vegetable crops, fruit crops, wine 
industries, sugar, vegetable oils, condiments and tobacco, vegetable 
fibers, non-food vegetables; the animal food stuffs, animal fibers, 
furs, skins; the mining industries; mtanufacturers — aluminum, auto- 
mobile, copper, chemicals, textiles, leather, iron and steel, paint. 



164 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

petroleum, rubber, etc.; trade routes, inland in North America and 
international trade routes; world trade centers. 

Geography 271. Geography of North America. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

Purpose: An intensive study of English America, designed 
(a) to give to the students a knowledge of the regional geography 
of the English speaking countries of North America; (b) to 
acquaint the student with the place geography of the continent 
necessary to intelligent reading of newspapers and magazines; (c) 
to give the student an appreciation of the geographic resources, 
possibilities and handicaps of the three countries studied. 

Topics: The United States as a national unit; the geographic 
regions of the United States as the Upper Lake Region; the Drift- 
less Area, the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, the Interior 
Highlands, the Puget Sound Trough, the geographic regions of 
Canada, as the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Region; the Prairie 
Plains and Arctic Meadows, the Pacific Mountain Region; Alaska. 

Geography 300. Geography of the South. Three hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give the student an 
understanding of the economic-geographic development of the 
South and a survey of its great assets, liabilities, and problems. 

Topics: The South, yesterday and today; the advancing South; 
the physical landscape; the cultural landscape; the major regions; 
the people of the South; the races and their distribution and 
problems; transportation facilities; agriculture, its development, its 
regions, its problems, and possibilities; power resources; mineral 
wealth, forest resources; manufacturing and industries; comparison 
of rural and urban communities of the South; the South's future. 

Geography 305. (Formerly Geography 205.) Economic and 
Historical Geology. Three hours. 

Purpose: This course is planned (a) to familiarize the student 
with the earth's history as revealed in its rocks; (b) to teach him to 
correlate the lessons of maps and the rocks. 

Topics: The origin of the earth; genesis of ore deposits; evolu- 
tion of plants and animals; origin of mountains; history and growth 
of continents; the earth's interor; formation and recognition of com- 
mon rocks and minerals; architecture of the earth; geologic time 
table; the geologic eras; the growth of knowledge of the earth; 
man's place in nature; geology in the service of man applied to 
industry, and to the larger affairs of men; economic and geologic 
features of minerals. 

Geography 372. (Formerly Geography 272.) Geography of 
Europe. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

Purpose: (a) To make the student thoroughly familiar with 
the map and political geography of the present European countries; 



CATALOG 1940-41 165 

(b) to give the student an appreciation of the geographic handicaps 
and advantages of the various European countries; (c) to make the 
student familiar with the important place geography of Europe. 

Topics: (a) The general geographic setting of Europe as a 
whole; (b) the physiographic climate, economic, and political geog- 
raphy of each of the major countries; (c) European trade and com- 
merce; (d) the geographic advantages and handicaps of the various 
European countries that have resulted from the changes in 
boundaries that followed the World War. 

Geography 373. (Formerly Geography 273.) Geography of 
Latin America. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give the student an 
acquaintance with the geography of Mexico, Central America, West 
Indies and South America that will enable him to understand the 
economic development of each and to follow intelligently the trend 
of political events within them. 

Topics: International importance of Latin America; growing 
interest of the United States in Latin America; historical geog- 
raphy of discovery, settlement and development; Caribbean 
resources; the Panama Canal; South America in world trade; 
population distribution; transportation facilities; climatic and 
physiographic regions; economic geography of the Pampas, the 
Amazon Basin, Central Mexican Plateau; the Llanos, Andean High- 
lands. 

Geography 461. (Formerly Geography 261 and 361.) 
Materials and Problems in the Teaching of Geography. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of geography. 

Purpose: (a) To acquaint the student with the objectives of 
geography teaching; (b) to acquaint the student with the best 
materials for this type of work; (c) to give instruction in the best 
methods of teaching geography in the elementary and junior high 
schools. 

Topics: Objectives in the teaching of geography, evolution and 
technique of visual aids; standard equipment for geography teach- 
ing; presentation of textual materials; the purpose and conduct of 
local field studies; comparative study of recent courses and texts in 
geography. 

Geography 471. (Formerly Geography 371.) Geography of 
World Problems. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of geography. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to study the 
geographic, economic and historic factors affecting current inter- 
national problems and to gain thereby the cultural values of world 
citizenship through an interest in, and knowledge of world affairs. 



166 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: Geography and the evolution of nations; the expansion 
of Europe; European influence in world affairs; economic resources; 
the British Empire and its many problems — India, Egypt, Ireland, 
South Africa; Geography and problems of major nations of the 
Orient; Islamism; Russia, past and present; Europe in Africa; the 
problems of the Far East. 

Geography 473. (Formerly Geography 374.) Geography of 
Asia. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give the student an 
acquaintance with the geography of all the countries and regions 
of Asia that will enable him to understand the economic develop- 
ment of each and to follow intelligently the trend of political events 
within them. 

Topics: The structure of Asia; the geography of Asia; the 
climates of Asia; the vegetation of Asia; the population of Asia; 
the exploration and exploitation of Asiatic countries by European 
nations; Asia's position in the world; the agricultural resources of 
Asia; summary of the economic resources of Asia; Turkey — the 
threshold of Asia; Arab Asia; the Iranian Plateau; the Indian 
Empire; Ceylon; Southeastern Asia; the East Indies; China, the 
Dead Heart of Asia; Japanese Empire; Asiatic Russia; growing 
interest of the United States in Asia; the geographic advantages and 
disadvantages. 

Geography 474. Geography and Geology of Kentucky. Two 
hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is (a) to familiarize the 
student with the geologic history and structure of Kentucky; (b) 
the various regional, physical and cultural landscapes of the state; 
(c) the wide range of physical influences which make up the 
geographic environment, and (d) the many responses man has 
made or could make in making a living in the state. 

Topics: The Kentucky country; geology; surface and drain- 
age; weather and climate; native vegetation; native animals; native 
people; the coming of the white man; the soil and its conservation; 
agriculture; animal industries; mineral resources; manufacturing; 
transportation; location and growth of cities; Louisville and the 
cities of the Ohio Basin; other cities; the counties of Kentucky; 
cultural features of Kentucky — government, education; Kentucky 
of the future. 

Geography 475. Geography of Africa and Australia. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

Purpose: This course is designed to give the student an 
acquaintance with the geography of two continents, Africa and 
Australia, that will enable him to understand the civilizations, the 
environment and the human activities of each. 



CATALOG 1940-41 167 

Topics: Structure; physiography; climate; vegetation; popula- 
tion; exploration; exploitation; position in world affairs; agricul- 
tural resources; transportation facilities; climatic and physiographic 
regions; foreign trade and foreign interests, comparisons and con- 
trasts with other continents; the geographic advantages and dis- 
advantages; changes resulting from World War and post-war condi- 
tions; present day problems and their geographic background. 

Geography 477. (Formerly Geography 377.) Conservation of 
Natural Resources. Three hours. 

Purpose: A course of practical value to all citizens and par- 
ticularly to teachers of future citizens in that it emphasizes thrift 
and the wise use of all natural resources and condemns waste. 

Topics: History of the conservation movement; the forest 
resources; soil depletion and restoration; the land resomrces; the 
fertilizer resources; water origin and supply; water power; irriga- 
tion and reclamation; navigation; the mineral resources; the 
mineral fuels, coal, petroleum, natural gas; the metallic resources, 
iron, copper, lead, gold, zinc, aluminum, silver, uranium and radium; 
the human resources; agricultural losses. 

GOVERNMENT 

Mr. Keith Mr. Burns Mr. Dorris 

I. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 

Government 111. American Government and Citizenship, 
Hiree hours. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to give a general intro- 
ductory survey of the entire field of American Government and its 
workings. Teaching of good citizenship is one of the main objects 
of the course. 

Topics: Local, state and national government; organization of 
the various departments of government with their functions and 
operation; political organizations and the influence of political 
parties; ideals of correct organizations of government and its just 
function. 

Government 311. Problems of American Government. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Government 111. 

Purpose: To teach problems of government; to give the 
student some idea of the evils consequent to government, with 
ideals of correct government. 

Topics: Problems connected with municipal, state, and 
national government; newer modes in organization and operation 
of government; problems connected with the franchise; various 



168 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

franchises in municipalities and contracts of state and nation; 
problems of incidence, levy and collection of taxes and appropria- 
tion of moneys. 

Government 411. International Diplomacy. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Government 111 

Purpose: To consider the relations among the leading nations 
of the world. 

Topics: Leading negotiations and treaties among the nations 
together with diplomatic and consular affairs in general. 

II. FOREIGN GOVERNMENT 
Government 351. English Government, Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Government 111. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the government of 
England and Switzerland and some of the political literature of 
these nations. 

Topics: The rise of governmental institutions of England, and 
her influence among the nations, kingship, parliament, cabinet, min- 
istry, privy council, and the Swiss system of government and her 
democracy. 

Government 452. (Formerly Government 352.) Foreign 
Government. Three hours 

Prerequisite: Government 111. 

Purpose: To acquaint the student with the political systems 
and political writings concerning France, Italy, Germany and 
Russia, and possibly with some of the newer governments, where 
time permits. 

Topics: Such topics as naturally arise in the study of these 
governments. 

HISTORY 

Mr. Keith Mr. Allen Mr. Dorris 

Mr. Adams Mr. Burns Miss Floyd 

History 141. History of Western Civilization. Three hours. 

Purpose: (1) To provide a historical survey of civilization 
w^hich will serve as a framework or background for subsequent 
study in fields more restricted in scope, (2) To provide an introduc- 
tion to the social sciences and related subjects that the student may, 
early in his college course, come to understand that man and his 
history can be studied scientifically only in the light of the 
investigations and researches in archaeology, anthropology, 
economics, sociology, psychology, et cetera. 

Topics: Rise of ancient governments, the city state in Greece, 
Grecian art and architecture, the rise of imperial government in 
Rome, the influence of the Roman legal system, the rise of the 
church and of nations in Europe. 



CATALOG 1940-41 169 

History 142. History of Western Civilization. Three hours. 

Purpose: (1) To provide a historical survey of civilization 
which will serve as a framework or background for subsequent 
study in fields more restricted in scope, (2) To provide an introduc- 
tion to the social sciences and related subjects that the student 
may, early in his college course, come to understand that man and 
his history can be studied scientifically only in the light of the 
investigations and researches in archaeology, anthropology, eco- 
nomics, sociology, psychology, et cetera. 

Topics: The continued rise of modern states with the develop- 
ment of their governments and political parties, the renaissance 
and reformation, dynastic and international wars, the rise of labor- 
capital disputes, the rise and development of the socialist party, 
the World War and its aftermath. 

History 202. American History. Three hours. 

Purpose: This is a survey course in American history, de- 
signed to familiarize the student with the general content from the 
discovery to the time of Andrew Jackson. Stress is placed on the 
bibliography and sources of materials for the study of American 
History. 

Topics: Discovery, exploration, and conquest by nations; 
colonization; alienation of the colonies from England and eventual 
revolution; establishment of government and the rise of a power- 
ful nation; the War of 1812; the beginning of the slavery contro- 
versy leading to final disruption. 

History 203. American History. Three hours. 

Purpose: This is a survey course designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the general content of American history from the time 
of Andrew Jackson to the present. Some effort is made to present 
the subject matter with the best methods of teaching and the 
literature of the course in mind. 

Topics: The slavery contest to the climax in the Civil War, 
then the story of the negro to the present; the tariff question and 
its bearing on sectionalism; mechanical inventions; foreign wars; 
banking and currency; industrialism, and the rise of "Big Business." 

History 242. English History to the Stuarts. Three hours. 

Purpose: To give the student a general review of the first half 
of English History with extensive work in the literature concern- 
ing it. 

Topics: The coming of the Anglo-Saxon, advance toward 
nationality, the Norman invasion, English feudalism, the Hundred 
Years' War, legal and political development, the Wars of the Roses 
and the fall of feudalism, and the Tudor monarchy. 

History 301. American History. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: History 202 or History 203. 

Purpose: This course is designed to bring the study of America 
from the Civil War to the Present. 



170 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Topics: Reconstruction after the Civil War, organized "Big 
Business," commerce, expansion, imperialism, tariff, foreign rela- 
tions, current politics. 

History 340. (Formerly History 240.) European History from 
1300 to 1789. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: History 141 or 142. 

Purpose: To provide a general survey of modern European 
history. 

Topics: Renaissance; Reformation; rise of the national, state 
and royal absolutism; decline of manorialism; rise of capitalism 
and the mercantile system; the British revolutions of the 17th 
century; international rivalries; wars of dynastic and territorial 
aggrandizement; the age of reason and enlightened despotism. 

History 342. (Formerly History 442.) English History from 
1714 to the present. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: History 242. 

Purpose: This course is sequential to History 242, and is in- 
tended to acquaint the student with the history and historical 
literature of the period indicated. 

Topics: The Hanoverian dynasty, the struggle for empire, 
development of British Imperialism, parliamentary reforms of the 
nineteenth century, influence of political parties, England's place 
in the "Parliament of Men." 

History 344. (Formerly History 241.) European History from 
1789 to the present. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: 142 or 340. 

Purpose: This course completes the survey of modern 
European history. 

Topics: The French Revolution and Napoleon; intellectual and 
religious developments; restoration and reaction following the 
Congress of Vienna; revolutionary and reform movements; national- 
ism; imperialism; political, social, and economic developments in 
the major countries; the First World War and its aftermath. 

History 400. (Formerly History 300.) Recent and Current 
World History. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: History 344. 

Purpose: The purpose of this course will be to consider the 
recent and current history of the leading nations of the world. 
An attempt will be made to read the newest books and periodicals 
on the subject. 

Topics: Economic, industrial, political, religious affairs of the 
nations considered. 

History 405. (Formerly History 305.) History of the American 
West, 1763 to 1890. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: History 202 or History 203. 

Purpose: To show the relation of the development of the West 
to American History. 



CATALOG 1940-41 171 

Topics: Advancement of the American frontier, Indian Wars, 
irrigation, political relations of the West to the nation, develop- 
ment of democracy, education, territorial acquisitions. 

History 406. (Formerly History 306.) History of the American 
South. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: History 202 or History 203. 

Purpose: This course attempts to acquaint the student with the 
historical literature and the history of the South in its relation to 
the Union. 

Topics: Settlement, peoples, religion, government, education, 
social and economic conditions, relations to the North and to for- 
eign nations consequent to slavery, the Civil War, reconstruction, 
resumption and progress in all lines. 

History 440. Modern Germany from 1789 to the Present. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: History 344. 

Purpose: A more intensive study of German history than is 
possible in History 344. 

Topics: Political, social, economic, and intellectual develop- 
ments; effects of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars; 
revolutionary movements after the Congress of Vienna; formation 
of the German Empire; domestic and international developments 
from 1870 to 1914; the World War; the German Republic and the 
Hitler Revolution. 

History 441. (Formerly History 341.) English History from 
1603 to 1714. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: History 242. 

Purpose: To study the Puritan and the English revolutions and 
to give the English background of American History, together with 
some attention to historical literature of the period covered. 

Topics: The Divine Right of James I and Charles I, religious 
and financial struggles of the time, parliamentary resistance to the 
first two Stuarts, the "Roundhead" Rebellion, and Charles II and 
James II and the English Revolution. 

History 443. The French Revolution and Napoleon. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: History 344 

Purpose: To give basis for better understanding of revolu- 
tionary and democratic developments in the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. 

Topics: A survey of the Old Regime with emphasis on the 
causes of the Revolution; a detailed study of the Revolution and 
the Napoleonic Empire. 

History 446. (Formerly History 346.) Latin- American His- 
tory. Two hours. 



172 EASTERN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Purpose: The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student 
with the history and government of the Mexican, Central and 
South American nations and their relations with the United States. 

Topics: History and government of the nations involved. 

History 447. History of France since 1815. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: History 344. 

Purpose: A more intensive study of French history than is 
afforded by History 344. 

Topics: The Industrial Revolution and its impact on social and 
political life; religious, intellectual, and cultural trends; reactionary 
policies of the Restoration period; the Revolutions of 1830 and 
1848; domestic affairs under the Second French Empire and the 
Third French Republic; French nationalism and imperialism in 
relation to Franco-German rivalry; factors in the decline of France 
in recent years. 

History 461. (Formerly History 361.) Kentucky History. 
Three hours. 

Purpose: To make a general study of Kentucky history, and to 
attempt to show the student the wealth of material for the study 
of the Commonwealth's history 

Topics: General, social, economic, political history of Ken- 
tucky; her influence in the development of American Democracy; 
her periods of leadership in the nation; her educational system; 
Kentucky's great men and women; historical sources of Kentucky; 
occasional excursions to places of historic interest will probably 
be taken. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Ferrell Mr. Hughes Mr. Burns 

Sociology 143. Rural Sociology. Three hours. 

Purpose: To study conditions and influences that affect the 
welfare of rural people. 

Topics: Historical background, movements and outstanding 
problems of rural life; problems and resources of the rural com- 
munity; community organizations, schools, and churches; the rela- 
tionship of the school to other agencies of the community; responsi- 
bility of the teacher for the improvement and enrichment of rural 
life; and other problems related to the rural community. 

Sociology 331. Introduction to Sociology. Three hours. 

Purpose: This course is a general survey of introductory 
sociology. 

Topics: Field of sociology and its relation to other social 
science courses; relation of living conditions to life; the problem of 
finding and using leaders; social achievements; man's relation to 
his institutions and his responsibility for them; the family, religion 
and morals. 



CATALOG 1940-41 173 

Sociology 332. Current Social Problems. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 331. 

Purpose: To study and interpret the facts about society and 
to use this knowledge as a basis for suggesting solutions that may 
contribute to social betterment. 

Topics: Crime, poverty, political corruption, unemployment, 
leisure, social security, conservation, disease, mental defects, mental 
hygiene, race, marriage, divorce, sex, prostitution, drug addiction, 
and suicide. 



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